tannus install crankbrothers synthesis wheels
Mechanical Misadventures

Hate Installing Inserts? Then do it three times.

Reading time

Inertia works in both directions. Objects in motion want to keep rolling and those at rest are similarly content with the status quo. This seems doubly true for Homo sapiens and particularly this example. It had been a couple of weeks since I'd done any serious bike work and the routine tasks that were piling up each began to feel monumental. Taken together, they felt crippling. One of the jobs I was avoiding was swapping out a bald rear tire for a freshy and installing a new Tannus Fusion insert. These new noodles come as two parts, an inner ribbed portion that can be used on its own as minimalist protection or in conjunction with a larger outer portion, similar to the original Tannus tubeless insert, only thicker and with ribs that mate with the inner portion. I wanted to use both together at first, to see if this was the first MTB solution from the company that was capable of being run flat.*

*"Run Flat" means different things to different people. For me it means you are able to ride fast enough to enjoy yourself so that a flat that isn't repaired on the trail doesn't completely spoil your ride.

The Specialized Butcher I was removing had been on there for a while; so long that strangers were commenting on the lack of tread. The "Gravity" casing sidewalls were still in excellent shape however and getting the bead to drop so I could remove the tire proved challenging. A task that normally takes a couple of minutes stretched beyond five. Once the tire was off I noticed the rim strip looked a little dodgy. It was peeled up where it ended and sealant had seeped between the overlapped layers. I did my best to press the sealant out, hoping it would magically re-adhere once the goop was extracted. This did not happen but at least it looked better. I knew I should replace it but I didn't have any decent rim tape; only more of the crappy red cellophane-looking stuff that was currently peeling off. And frankly, I didn't feel like it.

Instead I began to figure out how to install this new high-volume insert. I first tried stretching it around the rim and then wrapping the tire around it. Massaging the tire over the Tannus proved impossible so I went to the technique reserved for the most challenging inserts; I mounted the tire without the insert, inflated it until it was seated, and then let the air out and removed one side of the bead. The next step was to stuff the insert into the half-mounted tire. This involved a little wrestling and, using a technique I'd only use on tough carbon rims,* and never recommend, I eased it into position using my feet.

*Crankbrothers Synthesis in this case

The next step, setting the open bead with the insert in place, proved to be as difficult as any I've done before. The new tire with a heavy duty casing and a brand new high-volume insert was a punisher. I massaged and pulled and pushed for the better part of an hour but didn't even have the remaining side 50% mounted so I took a break. I was a little worried that I was going to be bested by a pool noodle for the first time.

Once I came back, I spent some time dropping the bead and then pushed the tire toward the gaping maw that remained unseated. Eventually, I began to make some progress and after another half an hour or so (probably longer actually) the bead popped into place. I cranked my compressor and waited for four terrifying pops, let all the air out, syringed in some sealant and left it overnight. And the next morning? Of course it was flat. The divine intervention I was counting on hadn't arrived.

tannus install crankbrothers synthesis wheels. 2JPG

While I did this, to gently push the insert into a stubborn and fresh tire with a heavy casing, I do not recommend it and certainly not without tough carbon rims. I'm certain there are less invasive and likely more effective strategies.

The leak was slow and I rationalized that sealant would solve this problem after a first good ride. I valiantly pumped up the tire and headed to Cypress. Once I'd arrived, the tire was completely flat but I stubbornly jackhammered more air in and we began to climb. Every ten minutes or so I'd have to stop and repeat that task but over time I stretched it longer and longer so I was riding on the airless, insert-equipped tire for long stretches. Air was escaping more quickly each time, likely because the loose insert was pushing the loose rim strip around. Eventually I gave up and began riding flat exclusively.

I began to notice something novel about this tire/insert combo. Once the air was gone, the Tannus Fusion and the fresh Specialized Butcher began to squelch and moan like a worn out clothes dryer. It was annoying and loud, particularly at lower speeds. We approached a large group gearing up to drop into Fifth Horseman, and they looked up to see what the fuss was about. One of them said, "I think you've got a flat." I said I was aware and that I had inserts that I could run flat. Another one of them, seemingly oblivious to the first rider's comment, said, "I think you've got a flat." I tried to explain again what was going on and Pedro Chambré (my patient companion) and I began to move towards the trailhead.

Just as we were pulling out I heard a different voice say from the group say, "hey, I think your tire is flat." Thinking he was in on the joke I said something like "really?" and chuckled a little. As it turns out he wasn't joking and he said again, "no, you really have a flat." Feeling like a jerk for being sarcastic to someone sincere (but somewhat oblivious) I began to think there was a camera on me but I again told my story, with the help of his friends, and we finally dropped in ahead of their group.

When I test inserts, the important task of riding them flat seems to get pushed to the background and only intentionally performed once I'm ready to write them up. Obviously it makes sense to get some real world, un-inflated trail experience early on, but without some sort of catastrophic failure, this rarely seems to happen. So this was a positive element of this calamity and I learned some important things about these new noodles. As always it was good to get out on the trail but after riding two long descents on a squelching flat, I was somewhat unsatisfied and quite frustrated.

Fighting the urge to procrastinate, I got down to replacing the rim strip as soon as I arrived home. I got everything apart, cleaned the rim bed well and then started to figure out a better solution to expensive and crappy rim tape without going to a bike shop. I had a roll of clear hockey shin pad tape (used to hold pads into place) that Trevor Hansen had left me and I decided to give it a try.* It wasn't as wide as I would have liked but it wasn't far off and seemed robust and flexible. I carefully stretched it into place, overlapping it for four spoke holes on either side of the valve hole.

*Stan's rim tape is 23 CAD locally for 10 metres x 30mm. Renfrew "Pro" shin pad tape is 13 CAD for 6 rolls of 24 metres x 25 mm or 144 metres total. Which makes Stan's $2.30 a metre and Shin pad tape 9 cents a metre. This makes Stan's 25 times more expensive by length. Or, since two loops might be necessary 12.5x pricier. I'm not singling out Stan's here since other rim tapes are similarly pricy. More testing is required but I'm hopeful about shin pad tape.

Riding it flat had stretched the tire out nicely and the install went smoothly this time (I may be onto something there). I aired up the tire and again left it overnight, more confident this time. I was all set to ride with a couple of buddies who were visiting from out of town and the next day my tire was flat once again. Once re-inflated, careful listening revealed one valve hole emitting persistent hiss. I gave that nipple a little tension, which slowed the hiss some, and left with the same misplaced optimism as the day before.

Instead, I again I stopped I began to stop and pump at manageable intervals but as time passed that interval shrank until finally it became pointless. Thankfully I could again descend well enough to keep up and the slower trails on Fromme made riding airless more manageable. I had again spoiled my ride with stubbornness and I was too pigheaded to go and buy some "quality" rim tape for some outrageous price per foot.

We were out with some friends for dinner that night and when we got home, a little after midnight and a little boozy, I decided to try the same thing again while hoping for a different result. Only this time I doubled down on my stubbornness. I removed the shin pad tape and replaced it with... more shin pad tape. I wrapped it even more carefully this time but continued for a second complete loop. The install was a snap after two airless rides on the tire and in about twenty minutes the wheel was aired up and laying on the shop floor filled with sealant squeezed in. Before putting it to bed, I carefully checked every valve hole, making sure no air was escaping. I hit the pillow hopeful but resigned after my two colossal failures.

Miraculously everything worked perfectly this time and I felt really good on the trail after having ridden two complete rides on a rear flat. I learned some things, particularly about installing tricky inserts, riding Tannus Fusion airless, and the viability of shin pad tape as a cheap solution to rim tape, at least when doubled up. How anyone can justify a price of over two bucks a metre is beyond me.

Have I learned to keep inertia on your side rather than procrastinating and letting things pile up? Learning and implementing don't always align and I'm quite sure it's a lesson I'll be forced to re-learn as long as I continue to tinker and fix things myself. Maybe I'll get a little better over time?

PS - I think you've got a flat.

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Comments

kos
+7 Cam McRae Pete Roggeman BarryW Andy Eunson Lynx . Tremeer023 Mammal

A great take on the medical school (and dare I say dental school?!) ethos of "watch one, do one, teach one".

Gorilla tape for the win. It's such a beotch to get off after 10 years when it might start to fail.

Pro Tip: Residue upon removal is zero if you just warm it a bit with a heat gun.

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cam@nsmb.com
+1 Kos

Heat gun for gorilla gunk is an excellent tip!

Thanks Kos!

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kos
+2 Pete Roggeman BarryW

Glad to help The Master! I just heat the tape a bit while peeling it back, and it leaves nothing behind.

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mammal
0

Another Gorilla gunk tip, slowly removing the tape at a right angle to the rim surface (pull straight upward), helps to keep almost all the adhesive on the tape.

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ShawMac
0

I product called Goof Off is good at removing duct tape/gorrilla tape residue!

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steven-kovalenko
+5 Tjaard Breeuwer Jerry Willows KristianG Cam McRae shutter2ride

The best investment in tools I've made for installing inserts was buying a brand new round $25 rubbermaid garbage can, so you can really lean on the tire and manipulate bead tension at a good working height when needed.

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cam@nsmb.com
0

Good one Steve. I know of this hack but haven't needed it in the past. This time it would have been very helpful.

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BarryW
+2 Cam McRae IslandLife

I've got a large Rubbermaid trash can for the detritus of working on bikes and it's awesome for installing tires andinserts. 

Cannot recommend it enough.

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MTB_THETOWN
+3 Cam McRae Morgan Heater Velocipedestrian

I usually have success putting it on a 5 gallon buckets and sitting on a milk crate. I can see the leverage advantage of thr large garbage can, but it would be a waste of space in my already too cluttered service course

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Lowcard
0

This is the best method I've used. It's the same one used for dirtbike tire changes. Also, moto levers make life a lot easier.

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fartymarty
+4 Kyle Dixon Cam McRae cxfahrer Tremeer023

I'm using Tesa 4289 tape as rim tape.  I get it in UK from Viking and they will cut to your required width.  You get a 60m roll for a bit over a Pavarotti (a tenner).  It's pretty damn similar to Stans and a fraction of the price.

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xy9ine
+3 Andy Eunson fartymarty Tremeer023

i've heard that stans IS tesa 4289. true or not, this, and a few other similar performing non-bike branded strapping tape options can be had at a fraction of the price.

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KDix85
+3 Andy Eunson fartymarty Tremeer023

You're correct, TESA4289 is Stans Tape before the branding

TESA 4289/4288/4829 and its 3M equivalent "8898" are Tubeless tape without the "Its For MTB!" Tax... Gotta save where one can ;)

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cam@nsmb.com
0

Not that cheap though. And not the ideal width. 1" is a little narrow and 2" is too wide. 

https://www.amazon.ca/tesa-Heavy-Duty-Tensilised-Strapping-Tape/dp/B0BSXV7LLZ

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Shannyla
0

Viking do it in 19mm, 25mm and 32mm as stock:

https://www.vikingtapes.co.uk/products/tesa-4289-tubeless-bike-wheel-rim-tape-32mm-x-66m?variant=39318301212735

Probably not too much help in the Great Frozen North after shipping and import, but that is for 66m of the stuff

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trumpstinyhands
+1 Kyle Dixon

Tesa 4288 is great. It's thinner than 4289 / Stans so stretches a little more. Better for sticking down in channels. Also the width becomes redundant as you can just start wrapping one side of the rim, and finish on the other. No more carrying 5 different tape widths in stock. One does them all for 'normal' rims.

Shmarv
0

Looks like ~$40-45 with tax and shipping from AliExpress in 30mm width for 66m of tape

https://www.aliexpress.com/i/4000465838587.html

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Roxtar
+4 LWK Cam McRae Lynx . Shmarv

Hey Cam, liked the read but a couple issues with the logic. 

First, I use actual rim tape because I very much dislike taping rims. Prefer one and done. The best tape I've found was, believe it or not, Slime brand. Thicker, stretchier, and cheaper than most. Maybe not .09/yard cheap, but not bad (and it actually works).

Second, "hope is not a strategy". If the tape is bad, hoping it will be better tomorrow is, well, ahh, not particularly realistic, is it? Showing up for a ride with that plan in place, even less so.

Third, and this one is for the whole insert-making industry. Why have we turned what was created to be a little extra rim protection, ala, the Huck Norris, into a run-flat option? Do we really need to be able to ride on flat tires? Between tubeless sealant, tire plugs, thicker tire casings, and the aforementioned light duty rim protectors, isn't flat repair pretty simple? Add installing a tube as a last resort and we're pretty much covered, aren't we?

Run-flat inserts are basically a self fulfilling prophesy. By making it virtually impossible to remove or install on the trail, we are stuck with riding it out.

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craw
+4 Cam McRae BarryW thaaad Konrad

The reason why run-flat capability is good is because of the situation where you have an unpluggable hole in your tire, but insert in the tire. What are you going to do? Pull out the Cushcore tool on the side of the trail so you can remove the insert and wear it like a gooey bandolier so you can ride home with a tube in the tire? Easier just to limp home and take care of it once. Totally depends on the type of ride you're doing, how far from home, feasibility of limping out, etc. For the type of riding I do 99% of the time it's an acceptable risk to not have to carry a tube. I run Cushcore Trail inserts with EXO+ or burlier tires and check my pressures before every ride. I can't remember the last time I even needed to plug a tire.

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Roxtar
+1 Shmarv

You've got a little circular logic happening here:

The reason why run-flat capability is good is because of the situation where you have an unpluggable hole in your tire, but insert in the tire.

You need a run-flat insert to get off the trail because your run-flat insert is impossible to deal with on the trail.

IOWs...

Your run-flat insert makes you need a run-flat insert.

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cam@nsmb.com
+2 BarryW Brad Nyenhuis

Good input Brad. 

"Second, "hope is not a strategy". If the tape is bad, hoping it will be better tomorrow is, well, ahh, not particularly realistic, is it? Showing up for a ride with that plan in place, even less so."

#attemptedhumour

"Third, and this one is for the whole insert-making industry. Why have we turned what was created to be a little extra rim protection, ala, the Huck Norris, into a run-flat option? Do we really need to be able to ride on flat tires? Between tubeless sealant, tire plugs, thicker tire casings, and the afore mentioned light duty rim protectors, isn't flat repair pretty simple? Add installing a tube as a last resort and we're pretty much covered, aren't we?"

Despite what you read above, I get very few flats, even fewer that aren't self inflicted like these ones, and the ability to run flat allows me to ditch a pack which is important for me. Strapping things onto bikes isn't a great option for me because testing has me riding different bikes regularly. With the best run flat options I've found (Cushcore and Octamousse are my favourites) I haven't found any downsides. I've run Huck Norris and other minimalist inserts but those don't provide the other qualities I'm looking for like good bead lock, low pressure access without rim damage, and quick pressure ramp up because of the low volume of air. I don't have much confidence in their rim protection or flat prevention either. 

If I rode somewhere else or rode different trails I could absolutely see ditching ride-flat inserts, but with that considered I'm very happy to have access to inserts that will get me out while still having a good time on my bike. Obviously these aren't for everyone but they are certainly for me.

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BarryW
+1 Cr4w

So I run Tannus Tubeless and while as Cam and Cr4w said it isn't 'run flat' in the sense of performance riding, I've happily rode at mellow pace 3-4 miles when my rim tape failed miserably. (Factory installed and I should have just replaced it but I didn't).

It meant I could happily ride with my nieces and nephews and not have to faff around for 20 minutes installing a tube. In that case it was priceless. And my tire seemed no worse for wear. Geared up about 175lbs and this was mellow trails.

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cam@nsmb.com
+4 BarryW Lornholio Cr4w GB

Something many people don't realize is that you can slide a tube inside a Tannus tubeless and ride out with the insert in place. It works great in fact, at least in the short term.

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Lornholio
+3 Cam McRae Andy Eunson Cr4w

This.  The tube-inside-Tannus feature is the reason I keep using it rather than go back to Cushcore Pro which I thought performed a bit better.  I only ever had to put a tube inside the Tannus once (thanks to a broken spoke puncturing my rim tape) but continue to carry a tube on anything except lift laps for that reason.

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Captain-Snappy
+3 Andy Eunson finbarr Shmarv

Spent almost $60 CAD (w shipping) on two rolls of Easton rim tape for the gravel rims. "Maybe the tape by the namesake brand will work?"... don't waste your time or money; -1/5 stars.

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Roxtar
+2 Cam McRae Lynx .

I've found the best tubeless tape to be one of the cheapest. Slime brand. It's thicker than most, has a good adhesive, and conforms really well to rim channels.

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tdmsurfguy
+2 Cam McRae ohio

Fun read, as I think we've all be there with inserts. But I always go back to the time I tried to install a 18" dirt bike tire on a 19" rim for my father; After an hour of swearing, soap, blooding knuckles, and only one side of the tire on the rim I ask "Hey Dad what size rim is this?" Yeah I'm an idiot. 

Growing up we tried putting dirt bike tire in the oven to warm them in the winter for installation...Mom didn't like that. I haven't had the guts to try it in my own home as I'm sure the wife and kids would vote me outta the house. Having installed cushcore a few times without their tools and just using my old Pedro tire levers, I'll recommend to get the cushcore tools.

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denomerdano
+2 Cam McRae Lynx .

This was great!! Thanks Cam!

I recently tried the garage 31 rim tape and am liking the stretch built into it alot. Works well with Orange sealant and while not cheap, easy to work with. Rest of the time, both muc-off and stans tape do the heavy lifting for me. The trick is to find tape width that go up the bead walls, that way, they don't peel off during the removal of the worn tire..

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Kenny
+1 Deniz Merdano

That's been the trick for me. I hated Stan's until I started using 33mm tape on 30mm wheels. Now it's perfect. 

But the 60 yard rolls not the 10, it's about half the price per meter. 70 bucks for 60 yards lasts a long time. 

I could probably find a cheaper way but it's been so reliable I'm not that fussed.

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andy-eunson
+2 Cam McRae mutton

At least you missed putting the tire on backwards. I do that way too often.  But I don’t use inserts. At my weight and how I ride I don’t see any benefit. I tried Tannus tubeless for a few weeks. Those didn’t have enough sidewall support and I ended up using the same pressures as without an insert. I rarely get flats. The last one was a spoke breaking and shooting through the rim tape. The one before that I actually cracked the rim bed. The rim was still round and true. 

I use clear Gorilla tape for frame and crank protection but it looks like it might work as rim tape. Has anyone tried it for that?

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g-42
0

I'd love to hear about that, too - I've been using regular Gorilla tape, and it's easy to work with (especially since it's so easy to get to just the right width and then roll from there). It's a bit messy though, and I've found the glue on the clear Gorilla tape to be a little less nasty - if nobody comes forward with their experience on this, I might just experiment with that.

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LoamtoHome
+4 Jotegir Kenny fartymarty Shmarv

Gorilla tape makes the tires hard to get on and off as it's not slippery.

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Kenny
+2 taprider Cam McRae

Most variants are also thicker, which eats up precious space in the rim bed and makes things tighter to get on and off, in addition to the friction. Really thin tape is helpful in this regard, as well as being slippery.

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mutton
+2 fartymarty ClydeRide

Also super hard to remove and clean the rim 👎

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Lornholio
+1 Andy Eunson

I used Gorilla Clear for a couple of years while the roll lasted.  "A little less nasty" is about right but it still requires a bit of cleanup.  Plus you have to cut the roll to width first.

I've been using blue Tesa tape for a while now.  It's as good as anything I've used before and about €10 shipped from AliExpress for a 50m roll.  Look for the blue "tubeless tape" with blurred-out Tesa logos in the photo - they don't mention Tesa in the title or description.

My emergency tape in the past had been a layer of electrical tape to protect the rim surface from gunk then a layer of normal Gorilla tape for strength.  Works well.

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Roxtar
+8 Kyle Dixon Morgan Heater Cr4w Cam McRae thaaad ClydeRide Lynx . jaydubmah

Just know that Gorilla tape is forever. Getting Gorilla tape residue off a rim brings back up PTSD from remounting tubulars.

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Remoh
0

This comment has been removed.

Lynx
0

Abso-friking-loutely LOL. I've used Gorilla Tape in the past and it goes on and is sticky AF, but when you go to remove it, then it seems to have gained even more stick and the residue is a royal PITA to get off, even good ol WD40 which normally works on most left over glue residue makes hard work of it. Won't ever use it as rim tape again, but amazing for trailside fixes of a bazillion things.

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mammal
+1 Lynx .

For aluminum rims, brake cleaner on some paper towel or a rag gets Gorilla gunk off really quickly. Slowly pulling the tape off at a right angle helps to reduce the amount of stuff left behind.

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Lynx
0

Honestly it's not something I use, will use again because I don't have much issue with normal rim tape, but for carbon rims that can sometimes be a royal PITA to get normal tape to stick to, it works amazing, never an issue. Will have to try the right angle pull trick and see if that works.

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slyfink
+1 Andy Eunson

I tried clear Gorilla tape once. It's too brittle. Didn't work. Not even close.

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cam@nsmb.com
+2 BarryW Andy Eunson

I have tried Gorilla tape and while it works, I'm not a fan for the reasons above and because of the difficult-to-remove debris it leaves on the rim. 

I actually did mount the tire backwards early in this process but forgot until you mentioned it! Luckily I noticed before putting the insert in. It's actually pretty hard to tell on Butchers because some of the centre knobs have no ramps.

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andy-eunson
+2 Cam McRae Velocipedestrian

There’s that moment we all get when you put the front wheel back in. Why is my rotor on the wrong side. Oh fuck!

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Lynx
0

Andy, lad, please give us an update when you try to remove said Gorilla Tape after several years on the frame. I have a feeling the frame may well just get tossed instead of what it will take to remove that gunk.

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andy-eunson
+2 Cam McRae Lynx .

Non issue. I’ve used it on SRAM and Raceface carbon cranks when the original film wore off and started to peel. I use a bit of heat gun to help it mold a bit better to the contours. Any residue comes off easily with goo gone or something similar. The clear tape doesn’t deteriorate like the duck tape style of Gorilla tape. That is nasty to get the goo off. When I used it on some rims that actually came with a roll of Gorilla Tape for that purpose I didn’t try too hard to remove the goo when I re-taped with more Gorilla Tape. Old goo didn’t have any effect.

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Lynx
0

Good to know Andy that there's a difference, saw it and wondered. Personally I don't do/need frame protection, have a totally raw, unpainted alu, so if it gets a little grungy, a little steel wool and polish and she's good as new.  but will keep it in mind for those that deal with plastic.

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Sethimus
0

Putting it on backwards without air, realizing it, mounting it again backwards not noticing it and then put the sealant in to finally realizing your mistake and then making a huge mess is the proper way of doing it :/ 

Have i already mentioned HOW EFFING HARD mating a fresh Conti DH casing with a fresh Vittoria insert is? that day was a proper FML day

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LWK
+2 BarryW Dogl0rd

I dunno, maybe if at first you dont succeed, quit?  1.5hr to install an insert sounds like the definition of insanity to me.  LOL

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craw
+1 Cam McRae

As a disclaimer for others. I'm 230lbs+ with gear and Tannus Tubeless absolutely does not run flat for me in any capacity. May as well be an empty tire. I hope these new dual-layer ones do better! I have CushCore Trail and Pro in other bikes and can limp home from a ride with no air; it's not great but it's fine.

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cam@nsmb.com
+1 Cr4w

That's accurate based on my 165lb experience as well and these are definitely much better. Considering I rode two complete rides, up and down on challenging trails, I'd say these are pretty good but I'll drill down more when I have more info and I write my review.

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g-42
+1 Cr4w

I'm 220lbs+ with gear, and run no inserts. At 25psi on the rear with Maxxis Double Down casing, I've not had a flat in several years despite riding 4+ times a week year round. Which I guess just goes to show that our trails (Bellingham) are very different from the North Shore...

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craw
+2 Cam McRae BarryW

I think I'm actually pretty easy on tires from a durability standpoint. I can happily run EXO+ most of the time. I added inserts so that I didn't have to rely on high pressure to eliminate burping. Being able to run low pressures to get good traction and tire performance while still not burping and flatting a lot is pretty amazing. I'm running 19/23 on my EXO+ tires with Cush Core Trail and it's an amazing balance of all the factors.

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BarryW
+1 Cr4w

So while that works it is a different feel from more flexible sidewalls and the ability to run 17-19 psi for absurd grip in the wet season AND still have solid rim protection. I'm personally 100% sure that it's saved my rims a couple times already. And I'm happily running trail casing tires for maximum flex and feel.

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mutton
0

I’ve ridden out on cushcore before but it burns my butt bec it destroys the tire bead and I’ve found I’m pretty much guaranteed to have issues going forward. It’s an expensive mistake I hope to not repeat. I strap a tube to the frame.

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cam@nsmb.com
0

Interesting. 

I've done some big airless descents on Cushcore and Octamousse without any tire damage. Same with these Tannus Fusion.

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jt
+1 Cam McRae

Good lord was mounting a tire with CushCore a mental and physical exercise. And that on a trail tire. Def not looking toward ever having a flat with that set up.

Currently running a dual ply set up on all bikes. First layer of Tessa tape for air tightness the wrapped with Effetto Mariposa rim strips over that. Why? While riding with a pal he had a spoke break which shot through the regular Tessa/Stan's tape without stopping to say hello, half way through a 25mi ride. Spare tube installed and away we went. Couple days later I'm riding home from work and pow! Same thing for me on the roadie. I am ok-ish with spokes breaking, but I'd rather not have one failure precipitate out multiple, easily preventable ones. Technically, you can use the Mariposas without the sealing tape, but I figure it doesn't hurt to have a failsafe in place.

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BarryW
+1 Cam McRae

One reason you might have really struggled to get the second sidewall on is that the first is on the bead. 

Try putting one side on, then stuff the insert in, push BOTH beads into the channel a'd use some velcro strap to cinch that so it cannot come up onto the rim. Then chase the second bead around and you'll find it's 100% easier on you and the tire. 

I can pull off a tire with Tannus Tubeless in less than a minute, AND reinstall in about 5 minutes using this technique. Basically it's the CushCore technique.

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cam@nsmb.com
+1 BarryW

Good tip Barry. I'll give that a shot. I'm not sure there would be room for this insert while having both beads dropped into the channel but it's worth a try.

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BarryW
0

It is useful to have a cinch type strap to really, REALLY get it down into the channel. But it makes a huge difference from 'I can't believe this is possible' to 'oh wow this isn't too bad at all.

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BC_Nuggets
+1 Cam McRae

Amen on not using gorilla tape. Oh the humanity.

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mike-wallace
+1 Cam McRae

I really don’t think Stans rim tape is a good product.  My favourite is DT Swiss.   It’s tackier and has stretch built into it which makes it much better.   As Deniz mentioned above the Garage 31 stuff looks interesting.

I recently bought several rolls of DT Swiss rim tape from BikeInn.   Much cheaper there than anywhere I have seen   

Gorilla is great when you are riding in some small town somewhere for a long weekend and need a saviour.  Put it over the original rim tape and you don’t get all the nightmare residue.

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MTB_THETOWN
+1 Cam McRae

Redoing rim tape is one of my three least favorite things to do, so the time and aggravation saving of using quality dt swiss tape (which works far better than Stan's) is well worth the extra cost

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Fasta_Pasta
+1 Cam McRae

Outdoor Builders Tape. Mine is from Bear brand. PVC in a shade of blue strikingly similar to the Schwalbe I previously used on customer bikes at my shop... 

50m x 24mm = $8

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shutter2ride
+1 Carlos Matutes

Best rim tape? Whisky, now Teravail, 'nuf said.

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MNKid
+1 Cam McRae

Reading this article just made me smile a lot. Cheers.

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cam@nsmb.com
0

Thanks Mike!

Cheers!

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cam@nsmb.com
+1 ShawMac

Another great tip SM. Nice to know someone else uses my dubious ‘strategies’ as well  

I wonder if shin pad/sock tape is more prone to damage from tire levers? That may be the case as it’s a little ‘softer’ feeling than branded rim tape. 

I imagine that information is in the item description for the tapes. A lot of data is provided. This is from one of Renfrew’s shin pad tapes. All you’d need to do is find a tape that works - or a branded one you like - and then match the specs up with a generic version and you’re golden. This one is quite thick compared to most rim tapes at 7micrometres (mils).

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Lynx
0

Cam, not a Cannuk, but I've played my fair share of hockey and used my fair share of shin pad tape and to me it'd be WAY too stretchy, better off using stick tape and then sealing it with some wax, just like you'd tape a blade for longevity.

Don't play any more obviously with where I live, but just had someone bring in a few rolls of regular hockey/stick tape to use on trail tool handles for extra grip in the wet and think I may well try using it on a rim that needs re-taping and see how it goes.

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ShawMac
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I kind of felt that more stretch was good as it sort of amalgamates the layers together. Electrical tape would also work but needs a wider version, and has much more residue. 

I hated applying the rim tape I used with no stretch.

Next time I will try the Slime brand if I can even find it.

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ShawMac
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This sounds like one of my tubeless adventures lol. I have the regular Tannus inserts. I used hope as an option with some garbage rim tape the other day and paid dearly. Garage 31, locally designed, absolute garbage; barely sticks to the rim and it was off the rim after only one set of tires.  

Here I thought i was the only one who thought sock tape/shin pad tape was a good option! I ran the experiment last week myself. One rim held air beautifully (even without sealant, the other did not but I think it was more of an issue with my valve stems not sealing. I did two complete wraps. I did find on inspection of the one that didn't seal, that the process of getting the tire on had wrinkled the tape up in some places and sealant had got under it. 

Hot tip, if you end up with a nick in rim tape that you don't want to re-tape, stick a piece of red tuck tape on there. It is designed for air sealing vapor barrier. It seals everything.

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