OneUp EDC Threadless Carrier NSMB AndrewM.JPG
REVIEW | PRODUCT LAUNCH

OneUp EDC Threadless Carrier

Words Andrew Major
Photos Andrew Major
Date Apr 15, 2021
Reading time

OneUp EDC Threadless Carrier

As much of a "WOW!' NEAT!" moment as the first OneUp EDC steerer tool was, I've never owned one. Just couldn't get over threading my steerer tube. Now, that's funny - to me - because I've threaded a few steerer tubes for other folks, and it really isn't a bit deal; but my desire to go packless or to never have to remember if my multi-tool was in my bag or not never overwhelmed my desire to not thread my steerer.

I'm very much not alone in this, and still, I know more folks that take OneUp's EDC tool into the woods than any other. It's not quite as ubiquitous as the Topeak Alien in the '90s, but I'd guess it's at least 2:1 amongst riders I know. Most of them don't have threads cut in their fork steerer. OneUp makes a fantastic mini-pump that can store their EDC multi-tool, including the chain breaker, in its handle. It is, apparently, a magical combination that they carry into the woods.

Enter a lot of competition for in-the-steerer tools systems, including OneUp's own EDC Lite tool, that don't require cutting any threads, and it suddenly came time for the people who really popularized* carrying tools in bicycles' void spaces to release their slick take on an update. Enter the EDC Threadless Carrier.

*Yes, they were not the first to ever stick something up, or down, a steerer.

OneUp EDC Threadless Carrier NSMB AndrewM.JPG

Step One: Choose the correct bolt length for your steerer tube length.

OneUp EDC Threadless Carrier NSMB AndrewM (2).JPG

Step Two: Preload headset. Same procedure as normal, but from the bottom.

OneUp EDC Threadless Carrier NSMB AndrewM (3).JPG

Step Three: Insert EDC Tool. Same procedure as normal. Maybe a touch more elbow grease.

Right off the line, the EDC Threadless Carrier has two significant advantages over the original EDC system. First, because the tool is housed within the carrier, OneUp has complete control over those dimensions, meaning the tool is dead silent no matter what fork you put it in. Secondly, my headset can be easily preloaded using the 4mm hex key from the EDC tool itself. As long as you select the right bolt length to begin with the system is as idiot-proof as using a star nut with no tools needed for installation (that is, of course, unless your fork already has a star nut in which case you're going to have to whack that little guy out of there).

At first glance, the obvious advantage of not having to cut threads only applies to the original EDC tool but I do have to say that the EDC Threadless Carrier is by far the most straightforward and faff-free of these in-the-bike tools that I've installed. That includes Trek's BITS, Giant's Clutch, OneUp's EDC Lite, Specialized's SWAT, and my Wolf Tooth EnCase. It's no exaggeration. I didn't even open a beer for the installation process. I had my bike ready to go in a few minutes.

OneUp EDC Threadless Carrier NSMB AndrewM (4).JPG

The EDC Threadless Carrier accepts a OneUp insert with chain breaker and the small storage capsule.

OneUp EDC Threadless Carrier NSMB AndrewM (6).JPG

The fit is very tight, and dead silent, but the tool comes out easily from brand new.

OneUp EDC Threadless Carrier NSMB AndrewM (7).JPG

Current EDC owners beware. The V1 tool inserts do not fit inside the new carrier, only the V2 will do.

Assuming a rider is starting fresh, the V2 EDC tool and insert will run 60 USD | 78 CAD and the EDC Threadless Carriers are 40 USD | 52 CAD. That's a combined price of 100 USD | 130 CAD.

The anodized aluminum carriers are available in eight colours, including Oil Slick because apparently it just won't die even now that roadies think it's cool. The other seven colours are Black, Red, Blue, Green, Orange, Purple, and Gold.

OneUp EDC vs Bontrager BITS

In my mind, the most obvious competing product to the new OneUp EDC Tool + EDC Threadless Carrier combo is the Bontrager Integrated Tool System. The BITS is 10 USD less expensive and 17 grams lighter than the OneUp with both systems set up for my Banshee. On paper, the clear trade-offs are the BITS' lack of a tire lever and storage capsule (handy for storing tire bacons!) but for the sake of my usage, that's a wash.

For me, where the EDC and EDC Lite tools are both obviously better choices than BITS is the insert top cap. Where the OneUp EDC tool sits proud of the top headset spacer it also both plugs (with the help of a rubber washer) and covers the top of my fork. I've had no issues at all with rusted tools with my EDC Lite tools, nor have I noticed it on friends' EDC tools.

In contrast, the interface of the BITS system sits flush and looks very clean but the metal channels allow water, and in my case probably sweat as well, to enter the steerer and my tool looks a bit crappy. It still works great on the trail but tools are one place I really feel cosmetics count.

OneUp EDC Threadless Carrier NSMB AndrewM (1).JPG

The Bontrager BITS is a bit lighter and saves 10 USD. It's a bit more finicky to install/size but once it's in the tools are equally usable.

OneUp EDC Threadless Carrier NSMB AndrewM (9).JPG

By comparison, OneUp's EDC Threadless Carrier + EDC Tool adds micro-storage, a tire lever, is better sealed, and uses a plain metric bolt for preloading.

The other place that the rubber-fitting EDC wins over BITS is noise. The little metal removal handle on the BITS would rattle about when the terrain gets really janky until I lightly modified it with a pair of Knipex pliers. Now it's just a bit more effort to get it to pop up.

Once the BITS tool broke in from use, it became a lot easier to remove, however I still give the leg up to OneUp here. On the other hand, re-installing the BITS is just a case of dropping it in and hitting the trail whereas the EDC requires a bit more effort.

I'm scoring this contest for OneUp unless the BITS is included in the price of your new Trek, where it's a great tool and the value there is obviously to stick with it. I'm also thinking there will continue to be new entries that look very, very similar to these two systems. I enjoy that companies are still putting a lot of energy into this category (even though yes, you can just throw a tool in your pack for a fraction of the cost) and I will be interested to see what Bontrager comes back with.

OneUp EDC Threadless Carrier NSMB AndrewM (11).JPG

My two issues with BITS have been a bit of noise from the removal handle rattling (fairly easily resolved) and tool bits rusting due water getting in from the top.

OneUp EDC Threadless Carrier NSMB AndrewM (10).JPG

I anticipate a lot of tools that look similar to these will be hitting the market. The steerer tube is the most consistently-sized void between brands in terms of making something universal.

OneUp EDC Threadless vs EDC Lite & EnCase

Alright, I agree that anodized aluminum looks way better than plastic every day of the week. But I love my plastic - sorry 'composite' - flat pedals and I love my EDC Lite tool. There simply isn't a faster and easier access multi-tool option out there and it uses the exact same tool as the EDC minus the chain breaker, tire lever, and storage, for a whopping 40 USD | 52 CAD which, I'll note, is the same amount of money as just buying the anodized aluminum EDC Threadless Carrier without a tool.

My own favourite combo is to take the EDC Lite and then add a bike-mounted chain breaker and tire bacons by way of a bar-mounted Wolf Tooth EnCase tool. The EnCase chain breaker is much nicer to use, sure, but the major advantage of the separate tool is I'm not pulling the whole assembly out every time I want to make a minor adjustment.

OneUp EDC Threadless Carrier NSMB AndrewM (8).JPG

The key advantages over the EDC Lite include the fact that anodized aluminum is much sexier than plastic...

OneUp EDC Threadless Carrier NSMB AndrewM (5).JPG

…and the addition of a chain breaker means not having to stash one elsewhere on my bike (or risk walking home).

This tool setup sounds like it is going to be a bit more of an investment since the EnCase chain breaker/bacon setup is 50 USD | 65 CAD and then the single storage sleeve adds 20 USD | 26 CAD. That makes my OneUp EDC Lite + Wolf Tooth EnCase combo a combined 110 USD | 143 CAD.

Compared to buying the EDC Tool + EDC Threadless Carrier, that's an additional 10 USD | 13 CAD and frankly, once you're investing in on-the-bike tools vs just throwing your preferred multi-tool in your pack this isn't a huge additional investment to get exactly the right setup.

On the negative front, I do know a ham-fisted degenerate who managed to rip the bolt through his EDC Lite carrier by preloading the very soul out of his headset. I'm certain the bearings of their Works Angleset sang out in joy when they were suddenly relieved of their tension. If that's a concern then an aluminum-bodied EDC Threadless Carrier is going to be a much better choice for you, but probably not your headset bearings.

One Up EDC Lite NSMB AndrewM (6).JPG

The EDC Lite is the fastest, easiest, best weather-protected, and best value option I've found for on-the-bike tools. I love it.

Wolf Tooth EnCase NSMB AndrewM (7).JPG

I combine the EDC Lite with Wolf Tooth's excellent EnCase in-the-bar chain breaker and tire bacon setup.

OneUp EDC Threadless - conclusion

For folks who already have an EDC setup that are looking to move it to a fresh bike or share it between their existing rig and a second steed I think the EDC Threadless Carrier makes more sense than threading another steerer tube. That's as long as the tool they're currently using is a V2 that's compatible of course. Yes, the system gives up some storage and the potential to pack around a CO2 cartridge, but it's just so clean and as a bonus it's simpler to preload and keep preloaded.

I can definitely see this system outselling any other on the market, including my preferred EDC Lite, simply because it combines good tools, including a chain breaker, in a very sleek, well-sealed package that anyone can install easily. Yes (since it always comes up in the comments) it's an investment compared to stand-along multi-tools and I can fully appreciate the perspective of riders who choose not to buy into on-the-bike tool storage. But, for those in the market for this type of tool system I think this setup fills the steerer tube void very nicely.

OneUp EDC Threadless Carrier NSMB AndrewM (13).JPG

It sits a bit proud for some folks' tastes, but I really like how well sealed all OneUp EDC tools are in general. #Raincouver influence at its finest.

OneUp EDC Threadless Carrier NSMB AndrewM (3).JPG

The top cap also makes for something solid to yank up on when overcoming those tight tolerances to use the EDC tool components.

It's easy to know this tool system is going to be a hit, regardless of which of the nine anodized colour options one chooses, just based on the components. The EDC tool insert (V2) is a proven product that's enjoyed by a ton of riders whether they're pushing it into a pump or running it in their steerer tubes and this new Threadless Carrier is a beautiful example of a keep-it-simple design that delivers.

Just to reiterate, starting fresh, the V2 EDC tool and insert will run 60 USD | 78 CAD and the EDC Threadless Carriers are 40 USD | 52 CAD. That's a combined price of 100 USD | 130 CAD. There are eight colours for the carriers, Black, Red, Blue, Green, Orange, Purple, Gold, and Oil Slick. More information, and availability, available at OneUp.

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Comments

MuscogeeMasher
+3 Andrew Major Cr4w Pete Roggeman
MuscogeeMasher  - April 15, 2021, 9:23 a.m.

Well done as always.  I've always poked fun at all the effort and money spent to avoid carrying a multi-tool and few small things in a low-profile hip pack, but this thing actually looks kind of interesting.

I know you are tired of me trolling all your articles with Titan questions, but I'm assuming that WolfTooth headset is a product test and not a result of problems with the OEM headset?

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 MuscogeeMasher
Andrew Major  - April 15, 2021, 9:27 a.m.

Ha, always interested in talking bikes!

I didn’t have the OE headset in long enough to comment on the bearings (other than to say bearings are a relatively cheap replacement/upgrade). That Wolf Tooth headset is their +1º/-1º Angleset.

Reply

MuscogeeMasher
+1 Andrew Major
MuscogeeMasher  - April 15, 2021, 11:44 a.m.

Thanks!  Forgot you installed an angleset.

Reply

giebelhaus
0
Alex Giebelhaus  - April 16, 2021, 12:32 p.m.

I had to replace my top bearings on my Titan after 2 months. As much as I love the frame, the hardware they send with it is cheap and I've already had to replace pivot bolts and the thru axle.

Reply

ShawMac
0
ShawMac  - April 20, 2021, 4:08 p.m.

Interesting. I have been hammering my Prime as hard as I can all winter and haven't had any troubles. I re-greased the pivot bearings a couple weeks ago and the grease inside looked fresh. Lower headset bearing came out last night and looked ok.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Pete Roggeman
Andrew Major  - April 15, 2021, 9:30 a.m.

OneUp did a really nice job with this carrier. Combined with the proven EDC V2 tool I think they can make claim to the crown - at least currently - for the best all-in-one stash multi-tool.

I do still think the combo of the EDC + Mini-Pump is the slickest option they make.

All that said, EDC Lite is my jam.

Reply

MuscogeeMasher
+2 Andrew Major Albert Steward
MuscogeeMasher  - April 15, 2021, 5:52 p.m.

Incorporate dynaplugs and I might head down this road.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 MuscogeeMasher
Andrew Major  - April 15, 2021, 9:04 p.m.

Man, I love my plain-jane Dynaplug Micro-Pull. They're my favourite plugs (over bacons) when I need to actually use them. Maybe a Dynaplug / Wolf Tooth EnCase Colab so I can have my favourite plug system and a good chain breaker in my handlebar?

Reply

giebelhaus
0
Alex Giebelhaus  - April 16, 2021, 12:31 p.m.

This comment has been removed.

khai
+2 Andrew Major Pete Roggeman
khai  - April 15, 2021, 11:18 a.m.

The timing of this is hilarious to me.  I've run an original EDC with the funky stem preload on my trail bike for a while now, and just this winter borrowed a tap kit, threaded all my forks, and ordered top cap kits for the rest of my bikes so that I could easily carry the tool regardless of which bike I choose to ride on a given day.  Buying the pump did occur to me, but after using the threaded top cap to preload my headset bearings I found it a real joy to use, so I jumped in and cut threads in my forks.

Now this...  Ah well - progress, right?  It's probably a preferred system to most.  But cutting the threads was really easy and it works really well.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - April 15, 2021, 2:35 p.m.

As I said, cutting threads is really not a big deal but for a variety of reasons A Lot of folks aren’t into it. I do have to say that I prefer this method of preloading the headset over the interface used with the threaded steerer.

Reply

denomerdano
+1 Andrew Major
Deniz Merdano  - April 15, 2021, 12:01 p.m.

That red ano is seeexyy.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 AJ Barlas
Andrew Major  - April 16, 2021, 7 a.m.

I mean, any colour but Oil Slick probably looks boss!

Reply

extraspecialandbitter
+2 Andrew Major Derek Baker
ExtraSpecialandBitter  - April 15, 2021, 12:06 p.m.

My only thought now is, hmmm, could there be a way to use this on straight steerer tubes, like on my road bike or commuter.  More pocket space = more space for snacks.

Reply

ackshunW
0
ackshunW  - April 15, 2021, 12:17 p.m.

I’m wondering the same—- to me it looks like the carrier necks down in diameter ~100mm from the top. So maybe it would fit? One up’s site is usually pretty good about that stuff, I’ll be scouring the FAQs later.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 ExtraSpecialandBitter
Andrew Major  - April 15, 2021, 2:39 p.m.

My gut feeling is that some 1-1/8” steerers will work fine and others won’t and for OneUp it wasn’t worth opening that can of worms give the target market.

For example, this will obviously work in a straight steel 1-1/8” steerer.

I have certainly seen some aluminum steerers where the ID would be too small.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - April 15, 2021, 3:05 p.m.

I guess the EDC Lite doesn’t cut it for the commuter due to the lack of chain tool?

Reply

Jotegir
+1 Zero-cool
Lu Kz  - April 15, 2021, 12:23 p.m.

Ok Andrew, you gave us the OneUp EDC Threadless vs Bontrager bits, and you gave us the Oneup EDC Threadless vs EDC Lite and Encase, but what about the OneUp EDC Threadless vs  the custom home built tool from 15 years ago using limited edition parts from Europe?

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - April 15, 2021, 2:41 p.m.

I feel like I’m missing an inside joke?!?!

Reply

khai
+1 Andrew Major
khai  - April 15, 2021, 2:42 p.m.

My guess is this is a reference to your hacked cluster for the kid bike.  But if we could somehow bring back the Cool Tool (and have it be relevant)...

Reply

Jotegir
+1 Poz
Lu Kz  - April 15, 2021, 3:47 p.m.

It's a reference to you coming up with hacked multitools (like theBlackburn) See: The Coolest Tool

Granted, this was only released today so you didn't have time to "Major" this one up, but I look forward to the inevitable article in a couple of months where you disassemble and combine a handful of hidden tools to create the ultimate mechatool.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+2 Lu Kz tdc_worm
Andrew Major  - April 15, 2021, 4:55 p.m.

Hahahaha. Touché! I really haven’t had time to explore hacks for it yet. 

EDC Lite and Giant Clutch Steerer tools are very compatible. With bars like Fasst Flexx that won’t take the EnCase I can carry my chain breaker that way.

Reply

tdc_worm
+1 Andrew Major
tdc_worm  - April 18, 2021, 11:22 a.m.

Sounds like we have tried close to all the same things, but I have one slight variation:

Rather than use the Giant Clutch Steerer tool, I use the Giant Clutch Fork Core storage with a 25g CO2 cart and inflator.  Then I have the EnCase Tool and Plug system in both bar ends.  This allows the use of a K Edge Gravity Cap mount for my Garmin.  

I'll be the first to admit that the EnCase tool is a compromise to the OneUp tool (the One up tool offers more leverage and there is no risk of dropping a bit) and the EnCase plug kit is a compromise compared to the Dynaplug (I've used the mega plug to seal a sidewall where bacon wouldnt suffice) and the Giant inflator is a compromise to the G2 and Blackburn variants I have used.   It is, however, the only combo I could come up with that keeps from having to store CO2 externally and keeps from having to mount a computer to the bars, where it is more out front and exposed.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - April 18, 2021, 5:18 p.m.

I love using the EnCase multi-tool. Especially when I actually need leverage from a multi-tool, I think it's the best option out there. t's beautifully made and relative to many of the stash options the value is very high in terms of quality, use, and manufacturing cost relative to purchase price. 

My only complaint relative the OneUp EDC Lite (and it's absolutely the winner overall in this category of all the stash tools) is just how fast and faff-free it is to pull out, use, and return to its nest.

I don't do CO2 and I've had good luck with standard bacons so, while the Dynaplugs are my favourite plugs, I don't have any complaints about using the EnCase bacons in the woods.

mrbrett
+1 Andrew Major
mrbrett  - April 15, 2021, 1:42 p.m.

One more happy OneUp user here! I was previously running a SWAT tool (that will probably get moved to my commuter) and recently switched to an EDC + larger OneUp pump. I have to say, the EDC is much better than the SWAT tool - just based on the multi tool alone. The spoke wrench, chain tool, spare link storage, jabber, and pliers are all bonus.

This thing is a legitimate improvement to pretty much anything else - at least that I've tried.

Reply

Onawalk
+2 Andrew Major MuscogeeMasher
Onawalk  - April 15, 2021, 1:50 p.m.

I’m going to go out on a limb here and make a bold statement.

There are changes coming to single crown fork interfaces that are a known quantity to those in the industry.  I’m basing this purely on speculation, but with recent upgraded (ZEB, 38) long travel forks, I bet there is a need for burlier steer tube, or more pronounced internal butting, or possibly a new 1.8 standard.....

Makes sense for these components manufactures to be ahead of those changes so their tools still work.

I understand a bike mags reluctance to thread a fork, and rely on that system (always changing bikes, or parts, etc). But the original V1 OneUp EDC is so slick, I’d thread a fork any day to keep running this tool.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 MuscogeeMasher
Andrew Major  - April 15, 2021, 2:46 p.m.

Sure, this carrier isn’t compatible with the Oval steerer of the 38 and so that means it likely isn’t compatible with future gens of Fox’s smaller forks either. 

You can really only stay ahead of you have prior knowledge of what’s coming or very rapid manufacturing. I think OneUp has done a solid job to date. Plus there’s always the option to put the tool in a pump.

Reply

Onawalk
+1 Andrew Major
Onawalk  - April 15, 2021, 3:18 p.m.

My tire plugs, and chain tool are in the pump.

I’m a bit of a sucker for the OneUp stuff, have too much of their kit, and it all works so well.

Chainguide/protector

Pedals

EDC tool-V1

Pump

Tire plugs/chain tool

Dropper c/w remote-V1

Nothing has let me down, it all works better than expected.

Reply

xy9ine
+1 MuscogeeMasher
Perry Schebel  - April 15, 2021, 4:43 p.m.

their bar is quite nice too (i mean, if you want to be a completist).

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Tremeer023
Andrew Major  - April 15, 2021, 4:59 p.m.

I could almost get over my near-religious aversion to 35mm bars if they offered a version with more back sweep. SQLab 30X (aluminum or carbon) in 12° or 16° (depending on application) are much comfier in my books.

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MuscogeeMasher
+1 Andrew Major
MuscogeeMasher  - April 15, 2021, 5:56 p.m.

Bars are awesome.  On all three of my mountain bikes.  Cannot recommend enough.

Reply

Onawalk
+1 Andrew Major
Onawalk  - April 16, 2021, 9 a.m.

Fair, thats a fair statement.

I bought a set of carbon bars (RaceFace) and couldn’t have been more put off by them.  I might even go as far as to say I hate them. Put my alu descendant bars right back on.  If they had a set of 35+ bars in alu I might give them a try, but once bitten (by that damn expensive carbon waste of money and space) twice shy.....

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - April 15, 2021, 4:56 p.m.

Didn’t love the alloy pedals (for some reason that large inboard bearing is much more notable than Wah Wah 2) but the composite pedals are my go-to.

Reply

Onawalk
+1 Andrew Major
Onawalk  - April 16, 2021, 9:02 a.m.

The composite, or plastic as I prefer to refer to them, are a bit of a revelation.  I had always spent the extra coin on alu pedals, but never again.  Well, I use “never”as an exclamation point here.  I do have a bit of lust for the oil slick alu pedals....

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - April 18, 2021, 5:14 p.m.

Oil slick... ugh. HAHAHA. 

My concern with composites, that kept me from trying them, was bearing life but once the quality options (like the Wah Wah 2) started shipping with the same bearings as their aluminum options I had nothing stopping me.

If the shape is good and they continue to prove durable (my riding doesn't change to the point I'm smashing pedals?!) I will continue to run plastic pedals.

Poz
+1 Andrew Major
Poz  - April 15, 2021, 2:06 p.m.

They say you can’t use this on carbon steerers why do you think that is? Seems like a good option for a replacement of an expansion plug.

Would be a great option for a road or gravel bike.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - April 15, 2021, 2:53 p.m.

My guess is two fold. Firstly, most forks with carbon steerers are road forks and they are solid at the crown (no hole for the preloader)

Second, generally when you massively HULK-fist a carbon steerer plug it pulls out. I can totally envision people who would use this to crush their steerer tubes. Probably not worth the stress for the odd SID or DT fork with carbon that’s out there.

Reply

Poz
+1 Andrew Major
Poz  - April 15, 2021, 7:32 p.m.

Well egg on my face. Just went and checked my cotic escapade fork and yup it’s solid underneath. 

There goes my plan to McGyver something up.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+2 Poz Derek Baker
Andrew Major  - April 15, 2021, 9:20 p.m.

No, no - this is solid brainstorming.

AND, there's no reason that OneUp couldn't combine an EDC Lite tool with a carbon expansion plug.

Actually, since road headtubes/steerer tubes are significantly longer than mountain bikes for a given size probably just a drilled out version of this Threadless Carrier with the bolt going from the inside into an expansion plug would work.

In order to insert would need to go pretty far into the steerer but it would be easy enough to integrate it with the EDC Carrier so that it would not fall in. Basically, it would work exactly like an FSA carbon steerer compression plug except instead of the adjustment being at the stem cap they would be inside the EDC Carrier.

Actually, I'm fairly confident I have the stuff around to make one so if I have a bit of time on the weekend I'll see about that!

---

Really simple for 1-1/8" steerers. A bit more complex for a tapered steerer depending on where the taper happens as most compression plugs don't expand much - but he, I'm sure the collective smarty-pantses at OneUp could figure that out. If you'd like to see it happen I'd suggest dropping them an e-mail (and get all your friends to as well).

Reply

Poz
+1 Andrew Major
Poz  - April 16, 2021, 5:33 a.m.

Ha love it! I think the edc light is a better (easier) candidate. They mention no carbon steerers for that too but your right I think it’s more to do with hamfisting a plug. 

The more I read your description of a plug being built in the more I think that would work really well even in metal steerers. Of course the big variable being where does the taper start.

Reply

hongeorge
+2 Andrew Major Poz
hongeorge  - April 16, 2021, 6:22 a.m.

Carbon tubes tend to be thicker though, so there's a good chance a carbon steerer won't have a big enough internal diameter.

AndrewMajor
+1 Poz
Andrew Major  - April 16, 2021, 7:08 a.m.

Good point. They used to be way thicker but certainly they’ve gotten thinner over the years. I’d still guess you’re right, but next time I’m putting something together with a carbon steerer I’ll confirm.

Carmel
+1 Poz
Carmel  - April 17, 2021, 1:43 p.m.

Someone on another forum suggested this tool:

https://granite-design.com/products/stash-multitool-plug

Should be compatible with most carbon steerers.

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Poz
0
Poz  - April 17, 2021, 7:38 p.m.

Well look at that! Must be pretty new as I’ve looked at the Granite stuff before. 

Thanks!

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Poz
0
Poz  - April 17, 2021, 7:38 p.m.

Well look at that! Must be pretty new as I’ve looked at the Granite stuff before. 

Thanks!

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - April 18, 2021, 5:04 p.m.

Cool! That's exactly what I was thinking. I also would have said I'm familiar with what Granite's doing and I hadn't seen that.

Thanks!

Reply

ShawMac
0
ShawMac  - April 20, 2021, 4:16 p.m.

So I pulled the trigger on one of these yesterday and installed it in my fork last night. I got it done, but it was a challenge I did not expect. The fit tolerances of the carrier are very tight, so I don't know if the steer tube got slightly out of round while trimming last time or if a couple different installations of star nuts roughed up the inside, but I could not get that sucker to drop in like the installation videos show. I ended up having to go to town with a round file and emery cloth on the inside of the steer tube to get the carrier to fit down with a reasonable sized spacer. First go had me having to use pliers to get it back out in order to try and clean things up, damaging the sweet finish.

This was likely not due to quality of the EDC carrier. But at least if you are cutting threads, you know that the carrier is going to fit.

It's a tight fit now, but at least I can get the actual tool in and out without feeling like I was going to brake the lip.

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