9point8 SlackR Angelset NSMB AndrewM (1).JPG
REVIEW | EDITORIAL

9point8 SLACK-R IS-Standard Angleset

Words Andrew Major
Photos Andrew Major
Date Jun 21, 2021
Reading time

The Best (and only) IS Angleset

I'm not often inspired to risk riding the bike industry's broken-runged tangents of consumerism and green-washing but every so often lightning strikes. Maybe there's a positive reduction in packaging worth noting or a product that's repaired instead of replaced, and I certainly do enjoy highlighting those efforts.

Anglesets, headsets that slacken* the head tube angle (HTA) of a bicycle are a story unto themselves. I love anglesets and, frankly, anyone who's a proponent of maintaining a bicycle over the long term versus routinely replacing it should love them too. We've written about it a fair amount here at NSMB, whether it's AJ's Love The Bike You Already Have, or my own Buy The Bike You Already Own or Revenge Of The Nerd Brands. Adjustments, they're the key to maintaining a fresh experience for bike nerds and keeping a bike (more) current for everyone else.

A lot of the time bikes get replaced not because they aren't perfectly capable for their rider's use case but because the rider is bored with them. Or, a rider chooses not to invest in updating them just to end up with the same 'outdated' geometry. The angleset presents both a psychological and physical solution.

*or, technically, steepen - hahahaha

9point8 SlackR Angelset NSMB AndrewM (2).JPG

An innovative idea from the bike nerds at 9point8 in Ancaster, Ontario.

9point8 SlackR Angelset NSMB AndrewM (1).JPG

This Slack-R Angleset kicks out the HTA of the Yeti SB104 BBR by -1.5°.

Until the recent release of the Slack-R, owners of some of the most popular bikes on the market - Trek, Giant, Santa Cruz, and Specialized among them - have been unable to benefit from the easy refresh and added stability of subtracting 1-to-1.5° from their head tube angle.

Sure, these products aren't cheap. But even in the pandemic-driven pinnacle of used bike pricing, the gap between what a few-year-old machine sells for and a new ride will cost is substantial, if you can even find a bike you want. So substantial in fact that buying an angleset, some fresh super-stopper brakes, commissioning a suspension service and frame-bearing overhaul, and even picking up a fresh set of wheels with rubber can leave a surprising amount of cash left in the bank.

9point8 SlackR Angelset NSMB AndrewM.JPG

The Slack-R adds about 20mm to the headtube length, so measure to ensure your fork has that extra steerer tube available.

9point8 SlackR Angelset NSMB AndrewM (4).JPG

Depending on how you like your handlebar position, you may also need to make an investment in a lower rise option.

The Slack-R IS headtube insert isn't perfect. That's a weird sentence to write because I honestly can't think of a single way to make it better. It's just that the simple fact that I'm trying to thread three floating pieces together with two hands in the confines of a standard IS41/IS52 tapered headtube has me scratching my head and opening a second beer.

The instructions are straightforward, plainly illustrated, and easily understood. The installation tool is a confidence-inspiring hunk of machined steel. The design is brilliant and the manufacturing quality is top notch. But unlike the dozens of head tube angle (HTA) and reach adjusting headsets I've pressed into frames to date, the Integrated Standard headtube (designed to accommodate drop-in bearings) adds a whole other level of bemusement.

9point8 Slack-R Angleset NSMB AndrewM (3).JPG

The Slack-R consists of three sections. The upper and lower parts simply sit in the existing IS integrated bearing seat.

9point8 Slack-R Angleset NSMB AndrewM (2).JPG

The two upper and lower are threaded tight into the center sleeve and then the current IS headset bearings just drop into those instead.

As I write this, the Slack-R is available only for bicycles using the IS41/52 headset standard. The most notable bikes that can't be helped by 9point8's current effort are Specialized's entire catalogue. That said, the Ontario brand has both IS42 and IS42-Specialized versions on the way, so maybe do hold onto that last-gen Stumpy-EVO or Enduro just a bit longer?

This headset assembly also offers a delicious option for the riders deciding between two bikes who are trapped in the travel v. geometry vortex. Hightower v. Megatower, SB130 v. SB150, Fuel EX v. Slash. A lot of the bikes to own these days use one Integrated Standard or another (yes, it's okay to laugh) and there may be just as many Slack-R headsets going to the owners of brand new bikes as those attempting to fully phoenix their older rig.

Configuration & Installation

In general, before installing any Angleset or reach adjust headset there are two things to check:

  1. Does my headtube have sufficient insertion depth for the skirts of the headset cups?
  2. Is my fork's steerer tube long enough to accommodate the increase in headtube length?

Now, in many cases the headsets do not add much to the total headtube length, for example, a -1° Angleset in a ZS44/ZS56 headtube. And in most cases with a press-in headset, the headtube will have ample room even if the new headset requires a deeper insertion than the current one. But having come across a number of folks disappointed to be unable to use their new geometry changer, I recommend doing the math before making the purchase.

With the Slack-R, as long as you've confirmed that the upper bearing of your headset is an IS41 and you've ordered a correct configuration for your headtube length, the only deciding measurement will be whether your steerer tube can handle the additional 20mm of length. It's 'a correct configuration' because there is overlap within the 16 different configurations.

It's worth taking a bit of a dive into their spec graphics to get a handle on exactly what option would be best for your application. For example, if you had a 100mm headtube then Slack-R Bravo (100mm-108mm) would slack it out -1.4° and Slack-R Echo (97mm-105mm) would slack it out -1.7°.

9point8 SlackR Headset NSMB AndrewM.jpg

9point8 is excellent at providing crisp, clear, instructions and information for what is in fact a bit of a process to get dialed.

Due to availability, I installed a Slack-R India kit (110m-118mm / -1.5°) in the 110mm headtube of this Yeti SB104 BBR. Normally, the best option would be to install Slack-R Foxtrot (107mm-115mm / -1.6°). No, not because I would notice the -0.1° difference in HTA but rather because it's better to be in the middle of the adjustment range rather than one of the extremes for products you're trying to cinch tight.

From there I followed the instructions since this was my first Slack-R experience. Even with carbon friction paste between the cups and my frame, I did have some issues with the headset walking off its alignment when I applied the final oompf to torque it down. It wasn't a big deal to reset and go again and I think that another pair of hands would have made all the difference.

I think that with the Slack-R Foxtrot kit this wouldn't have been an issue thanks to the extra range of adjustment to play with but either way, it only took a couple of minutes to reset and I hit perfect alignment on my third attempt. Now that I've installed quite a few different angle & reach adjusting headsets I usually get them aligned on the first go, but compared to my first experiences with other units, the Slack-R required zero blue language and it only ended up being a one beer job.

9point8 Slack-R Angleset NSMB AndrewM (5).JPG

The tool. I can't get flustered about a proprietary interface for a totally unique application. It's included with the headset and interfaces with a 19mm socket.

9point8 Slack-R Angleset NSMB AndrewM (4).JPG

This is the tricky part: you need to tighten everything up without the cups slipping from their orientation. Carbon friction paste between the cups and headtube is a winning combo.

Once the Slack-R is tightened up snug it's just a matter of dropping in the IS bearings and installing the fork just like normal. I didn't have to re-tighten the Slack'R assembly and there have been zero squeaks or creakings, which is something I'll keep an ear out for going forward. I don't anticipate any issues as everything is well greased and snugged tight, but at the end of the day, it would be quick and easy enough to pull the Slack-R out, clean it, and reinstall if it came to that. Bearing life is going to depend on the grade of IS headset that you purchase, which I should note is not included with the Slack-R kits. I generally find the Cane Creek 40 is a good min-max purchase for IS.

The Angleset will be easy enough to transfer to another frame - with no headset press or punch required - and in that way, I can come around to the thinking that the Integrated Standard is more friendly for the home mechanic friendly, or at least more economical. The issue with transferring, of course, is whether the headtube length on a new frame will be the same as the current one. 9point8 does also sell all the parts to the Slack-R individually so there's the potential there to reconfigure for another application.

9point8 Slack-R Angleset NSMB AndrewM (7).JPG

This is configuration India, for a 110-118mm headtube. In total there are 16 configurations, from Alpha to Papa, on the current spec list.

9point8 Slack-R Angleset NSMB AndrewM (1).JPG

The current upper assemblies will fit IS41 standard bearing seats and accept IS41 bearings. Versions for IS42 and IS42-Specialized are coming.

The 9point8 Slack-R is my favourite bicycle hop-up I've played with so far in 2021. It's easy enough to install, beautifully imagined, nicely executed, and, frankly, as upgrades go that will make a notable change to performance, it's cheap. Actually, if the boost in stability and front center from a -1.5° HTA change freshens a bike up to ride it for a couple more seasons, and this goes for all anglesets, it may be the best mountain bike bargain going.

If you're looking at your current IS41/IS52-headtubed rig and doing the hard math on whether to refit to sell it, how can you not try the 100 USD | 130 CAD investment in a refresh?

Related Stories

Trending on NSMB

Comments

Kenny
+1 Andrew Major
Kenny  - June 21, 2021, 12:43 a.m.

The other thing to be aware of is on some frames the internal diameter of the headtube may be too small to accomodate the center piece of the slack-r. Santa Cruz chameleon being the most notable example. 

I had to grind out some material from inside the headtube of my chameleon carbon to fit mine. YouTube guy "hardtail party" details the same ordeal on his channel. Nerve wracking but works well.

Reply

Bikeryder85
+1 Andrew Major
Bikeryder85  - June 21, 2021, 3:14 a.m.

Good to know about the chameleon...do you know if there is the same issue with the AL version or just the carbon?

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - June 21, 2021, 6:23 a.m.

Very interesting on the carbon, carbon, carbon Chameleon. I would have loved to try it with this headset. A combination of a relatively short headtube and a lot of material I guess?

My hunch would be that the aluminum one will fit no problem. That is, I’d be very surprised if it didn’t. 

.

Also, I’d say, this is a generally trickier product than most when it comes to compatibility - so if there’s any doubt on fitment it’s worth dropping the gents at 9Point8 a note.

Reply

velocipedestrian
+2 Andrew Major AJ Barlas
Velocipedestrian  - June 21, 2021, 2:55 a.m.

I'm sending this straight to my buddy with a Giant. It seems like a Works won't, maybe this will. Thanks!

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - June 21, 2021, 6:17 a.m.

It depends on why the Works won’t. Some old Giants with ZS44 headtubes don’t have enough insertion depth at the lower cup to take an EC44 Angleset cup, in which case this won’t help. 

I’m far from being an expert on Giant, but I thought all their more recent bikes come with an FSA no.57 which is just a common ZS44/ZS56 press-in headset. In that case I can’t think why a Works wouldn’t… work.

Reply

delusional
+1 Andrew Major
delusional  - June 21, 2021, 9:20 a.m.

Not sure which Giant your buddy has, but I was able to fit a Works -1.5 in my carbon 2016 Reign without any issues.

Reply

velocipedestrian
+1 Andrew Major
Velocipedestrian  - June 21, 2021, 5:32 p.m.

He's on a Trance, not sure what year. Had a Works on his last alu bike... Might be just his LBS being cautious.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - June 21, 2021, 6:44 p.m.

I’d be surprised/eager to learn why his Trace can’t use a Works 44/56 Angleset.

Reply

velocipedestrian
+1 Andrew Major
Velocipedestrian  - June 29, 2021, 9 p.m.

So I went round and we had a look at the stock headset today. It's a normal looking zs, probably 44/56 unit, but there was one thing that gave me pause.

The contact surface between the carbon frame and alu cups can't be more than 4mm, then the frame widens away from the headset. I couldn't tell if it was just a press fit, or if there was a bond of some kind helping out, but that seems like a very shallow contact to me. The Works lower cup has ~13mm of surface ready to mate with the frame, should he be nervous with so little overlap?

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - June 29, 2021, 9:34 p.m.

Having a hard time visualizing (could be the heat). You're saying the headtube tapers outwards toward the center and inwards where the cups press in (like an egg?). 

Basically, you're saying the insertion depth of the Works Angleset is 13mm but the actual contact depth of the headtube is 4mm? That does sound like very little contact. You've already removed the stock cup?

Photo?

velocipedestrian
0
Velocipedestrian  - June 29, 2021, 11:59 p.m.

Your egg analogy is about right, the carbon is very thin and flares away from the cups.

4mm is a guesstimate (though I have plenty of trust in my eyeometer). Didn't remove the cups, just the fork and bearings for a peek. 

Heat? We had sleet yesterday!

jwellford
+1 Andrew Major
jwellford  - June 21, 2021, 4:27 a.m.

Can anyone think of a reason not to use this with a ZS44/IS52 bike? The ZS44 bearing is the same as the one you’d use for IS41, so I assume the upper Slack-R piece would sit in the ZS44 bearing cup just fine… I asked 9point8 about this last year and they didn’t want to have anything to do with it, only saying it’s not recommended for anything other than IS.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+4 ackshunW jwellford mrbrett ManInSteel
Andrew Major  - June 21, 2021, 6:08 a.m.

Stacking headset cups sounds like an awful idea. In terms of a specific concern, I’d be eagle eyed on that top cup for cracks as the Slack-R could potentially be putting a lot more leverage/force into cup sleeve than it was meant to have? 

Not surprised 9point8 want nothing to do with it - they’re engineers and designed the system for a specific set of circumstances. I’m not an engineer, and normally open to messing with stuff but I also trust my instincts and this one gives me gas.

Presumably you too since you haven’t just done it?

.

As an aside, what ridiculous pack of bleeding assholes designed a frame that uses a mix of press-in and integrated headset standards?

My mind is blown.

Reply

jwellford
+1 Andrew Major
jwellford  - June 21, 2021, 6:25 a.m.

Good point on extra leverage from the stacked cups. I’d be willing to experiment if I had the part lying around: I’m not worried about catastrophic failure and a ZS cup is easy enough to replace. But I’ve been hesitant to spend $100 on the idea. I’ll live with the 69* headtube.

Not to point fingers but… Canyon.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Lu Kz
Andrew Major  - June 21, 2021, 6:31 a.m.

Oh no, no, point fingers. Middle fingers. 

I’m so curious! Did you know about the headset mix when you bought it? Just figured it wouldn’t be a big deal (headsets are sold in halves)? Too good a deal to pass on?

Or was it something you figured out later? When you went to get an Angleset? 

Would you be willing to share the model/year so I can look it up? 

Pretty sure I need to write something about this massive bike-design party foul.

Reply

jwellford
+1 Andrew Major
jwellford  - June 21, 2021, 8:37 a.m.

It’s a 2018 Lux: the prior frame design that has a vertical shock along the seat tube. I think it’s a model from the year before Canyon entered the US market, but I bought it directly from Canyon USA as a used bike (demo presumably) with a full warranty. Decent deal, probably $600-800 less than new. It was my first MTB and I didn’t know much at the time. 

I don’t think the mixed standards is a big deal in this case, aside from making angle sets impossible. The IS lower just needs a bearing, so if you need to replace the headset you can get a ZS pair and toss the bottom cup.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+5 jaydubmah Velocipedestrian DMVancouver jwellford MuscogeeMasher
Andrew Major  - June 21, 2021, 9:07 p.m.

Thanks! You are absolutely correct that it's not a big deal in terms of sourcing replacement bearings/headsets; however, it's like pouring three shots of gin into a 12oz glass of red wine - just because it's all alcohol doesn't make it okay.

As someone who believes that the basic measure of any person or business in the bike industry is whether or not they give a f***, the fact that Canyon managed to assemble a team of engineers and product managers that thought it was cool to blend Integrated and press-in-cup headset standards in the same frame actually shocks me. 

It's approaching the level of Giant's proprietary 1.5-1-1/4" Overdrive steerer tubes in terms of things that simply should never have happened because there are enough experienced folks at the company that someone should have said STOP.

Darren_M
+2 Andrew Major ManInSteel
Darren Manning  - June 21, 2021, 8:05 a.m.

The reason it wont work in a ZS44 cup that uses the IS41 bearing, is that the depth the bearing sits at in the ZS cup is way deeper than the standard 3.5mm of an IS bearing seat. I measured my ZS cup at a depth of 8.7mm and the Slack-R kit would not be sitting on the bearing seats like it's designed to. Instead it could potentially damage the frame. If you came up with some kind of angled spacer that you could make up the difference with, there is potential it could work. But 9point8 does NOT recommend it, and it would be at your own risk.

Reply

jwellford
+1 Andrew Major
jwellford  - June 21, 2021, 10:41 a.m.

Thanks Darren, that explains it.

Reply

Jotegir
+1 Andrew Major
Lu Kz  - June 21, 2021, 6:48 a.m.

Oh neat! Despite being someone who's been off Trek for a number of years and on brands that don't use IS cups in their high end bikes, The Slack-r (or Slack-daddy as we've been calling it at the shop; a simultaneously far better and far worse name) has occupied a fair amount of brain time since release. It's one thing to fire this on to a relatively modern, but certainly not "progressive" on its release Yeti SB104, but I get more excited when you take it a bit further - A 2014-16 Fuel EX gets a lot more interesting with one of these installed! Pre-covid bike pricing, those things could be picked up in the higher ranged alloy options for like $1500 Canadian. A tempting recommendation for the newer rider looking for something like the current top fuel.

I've sadly been seeing some people getting criminally close to retail numbers for their clapped and haggard old bikes. Maybe not 2015ish era, but absolutely hosed 2018/19 enduro bikes? Good god. Once the brake bleed/pads, bearing swap (probably not though), suspension service (lol yeah right), drivetrain or half-drivetrain, and fresh rubber goes in, you're looking at prices near- or even above retail if you got suckered in to paying far too much for what may have literally been the only medium 160mm 29er in a 300km radius. I'm quite ambivalent to the whole situation, between a rider maximizing their value on their outgoing bike, someone's lack of patience on getting the new one, and a general sense of "fairness" for newbies in the used bike market.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+3 Lu Kz ManInSteel jaydubmah
Andrew Major  - June 21, 2021, 7:04 a.m.

Hahaha that is a simultaneously awesome & awful re-naming!

Yes, the SB104 BBR is just an IS frame I had access to. I’d have loved to have build up an older IS frame with this headset and my mullet wheel. Something like a Niner that had a higher BB to accommodate a big ring.

Used pricing is insane and there are a lot, A LOT, of asshole mountain bikers wearing shrouds knit from bad karma for the shit shows they’ve put new riders through. Buyer beware, sure. Seller have a care too though. I’ve seen plenty of - generally mid-level - bikes this year where purchase price + necessaries (needs not wants) are at or even above the SRP of a new bike.

I have a couple or few used bike rat rod projects I’d love to do but waiting on pricing to come down in the future.

Reply

Jotegir
+1 Andrew Major
Lu Kz  - June 21, 2021, 7:45 a.m.

Someone bought a bike from us for retail in the fall. It was a hot model (think another website who names such things "bike of the year"), the SRP went up $600 around March, and once shop floors were mopped clean in April, the exact bike (we're a small community up here) was listed on pinkbike for original SRP + 600 + tax.

A few days later it was gone.

Criminal I tells ya.

Although you qualified your statement "there are a lot, A LOT, of asshole mountain bikers", I think it stands on its own. Ha!

Reply

mrbrett
+2 Andrew Major ManInSteel
mrbrett  - June 21, 2021, 7:12 a.m.

Thanks for the detailed write-up on a product that hasn't had a lot of air time. I need one of these for my fat bike, but just didn't have enough info yet to make the leap. I'm going to go for it now.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - June 21, 2021, 7:24 a.m.

Cool; Happy to nerd out for your benefit!

If in doubt on fitment, the folks at 9Point8 are really helpful.

Reply

andy-eunson
+1 Andrew Major
Andy Eunson  - June 21, 2021, 7:34 a.m.

This would negate the function of the Trek nock block on my Remedy. But the extra height at the bottom would negate the need and provide clearance. Tempting.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Lu Kz
Andrew Major  - June 21, 2021, 7:37 a.m.

I can’t tell if you’d be lamenting the loss of KnockBlock or not?

There’s a whole section on KnockBlock on the 9Point8 website. Some models may not have clearance even with the external cup. Gotta have that straight downtube aesthetic.

Reply

andy-eunson
+1 Andrew Major
Andy Eunson  - June 21, 2021, 1:50 p.m.

It’s not a make or break deal for me. I did damage a brake hose once when I did a bar spin, well my bike did a bar spin as I tumbled down a slope.

Reply

ManInSteel
+2 Andrew Major Spencer Nelson
ManInSteel  - June 21, 2021, 8:33 a.m.

Looking forward to IS42/IS52 version!  

Many Pre-2018 Norco Sight owners with FSA Orbit C40 ACB (No.42/ACB) headset are waiting.  Go 9P8!

Reply

SpencerN
0
Spencer Nelson  - June 21, 2021, 8:20 p.m.

Optics, too! Take my money!

Reply

wishiwereriding
0
John Keiffer  - June 21, 2021, 11:10 a.m.

For this to be a truly outstanding customer experience, they would need a frame compatibility lookup tool.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+5 ManInSteel Bikeryder85 Mammal Spencer Nelson MuscogeeMasher
Andrew Major  - June 21, 2021, 11:46 a.m.

It’s way too much work to update/sort/maintain. Sort of like how CaneCreek used to have an awesome base tune guide for their shocks for a bazillion different bikes. Updating every year becomes a Herculean task and you have to confirm for yourself because going off company spec is just a recipe for tears (this is the reason Push won’t build shocks for any frame they haven’t measured in person at their facility).

.

Besides that, in my experience - and I’ll note this is my own opinion not that of NSMB or 9P8 - if someone can’t perform the basic tasks of measuring their headtube length and reading what’s printed on the bearing the upper headset assembly uses they’re not someone you want to sell a product like this to anyways.

Way better off to have one of your retail partners (bike shop) ordering the correct Slack-R setup and, even more importantly, installing it. The number of emails, phone calls, full money back returns, and bad reviews that stem from folks overestimating their aptitude is mind boggling. Little gateways are good.

Reply

syncro
-1 MuscogeeMasher
Mark  - June 21, 2021, 5:25 p.m.

Pardon my ignorance, but I have to ask, in that second set of pics what is that ungodly contrivance protruding from what looks to be your shifter?

Reply

AndrewMajor
+2 Velocipedestrian Mark
Andrew Major  - June 21, 2021, 6:50 p.m.

It’s a Wolf Tooth Tanpan. More specifically, it’s a cable pull ratio converter. This one is meant to change the cable pull ratio on a 10-Spd Shimano road brifter (brake-shifter) so it can be used with a 10/11 mountain bike derailleur - that way you can get bigger low gears for 1x conversions or for touring AND a clutch derailleur for gravel use while still using a drop bar.

Reply

LesterChester
+1 Andrew Major
LesterChester  - June 22, 2021, 2:06 p.m.

I’ll be interested to see your longterm experience. I installed a Slack-R Echo on my Al Chameleon and couldn’t get it to stop creaking/popping. I reinstalled a few times and it’d be okay for a ride or two then would come back. Removal was sort of a bear trying to wrestle the loctite while not spinning the cups in the frame. Maybe an installer (ham fisted me) issue, but after a few tries I decided I was actually pretty happy without it. Hopefully it was just me because it otherwise seems like a great option.

One thing to watch for is that on my installation the threads on the top cup bottomed out before the treads on the bottom. When threaded on equally there were ~4 threads still showing on the bottom cup when the top was tight. Something to keep an eye on when installing because for me it meant that when I went to torque it all down initially the threads on the top bound and the cups spun in the frame. …that might not make sense without the parts in hand*.

This was from Oct/2020 so things might have changed since then as well.

*Actually, your assembled product shot shows what I’m talking about. A few more threads on the bottom cup. In my case that was enough to make a difference.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - June 22, 2021, 2:52 p.m.

What did you use between the Slack-R and your frame? From my experience with CaneCreek Anglesets in the past I never had the creaking issues others complained of; my secret  was to not spare the carbon paste or anti-seize. 

If the assembly is tight-tight popping makes me wonder if there’s an issue with bearing surface on the frame? Good enough to drop in a bearing may not be equally good enough tolerance for the interface with the Slack-R? 

Did 9Point8 have any advice/feedback?

Reply

LesterChester
+1 Andrew Major
LesterChester  - June 22, 2021, 3:31 p.m.

I was pretty generous with the carbon paste, especially on the third go :-)

There definitely could be something wrong with the bearing surfaces in my frame. I wouldn’t discount that as a potential culprit. No issues with standard bearings.

Yup, I’m “that guy” that didn’t simply call the company for advice. Just happened to decide I was happy with the bike without the angleset (albeit with a Durolux with a longer axle-to-crown than the stock 34 the Chameleon came with) so just pulled it off.

Don’t mean to bash the product at all (I also don’t know what I’d change about it…), mostly just wanted to give the heads up on the potential install issue of there seeming to be a difference on the number of threads top/bottom cups that gave me trouble at install. If it binds then those little threads take a beating.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - June 22, 2021, 4:34 p.m.

Cheers! I’m a problem solver by nature so I’m always eager to find a solution (even when folks aren’t looking for one…). 

I’ll certainly report back if I experience any issues, but all good for now. In terms of binding, it’s definitely desirable to be in the middle of a given size range if possible.

Reply

Please log in to leave a comment.