Five Ten Trail Cross XT Deniz Merdano photo3.jpg
REVIEW

Five Ten Trailcross XT

Words Pete Roggeman
Photos Deniz Merdano
Date Jan 28, 2021
Reading time

In the 20 or so years since Five Ten first ported Stealth rubber from climbing shoes onto a skate shoe chassis intended for riding, a lot of refinement has taken place in the flat shoe world - just not as much as we all might have liked. Indeed, Five Ten's first act as a MTB shoe company was its finest: Stealth rubber is an innovation that actually deserves the dreadful game changer moniker. Its consistent supremacy and the difficulty competitors have had in catching up to it are a rare feat.

In all that time, Five Ten's competitors have been able to attack traits that, for some, kept Five Tens from being perfect: shoes became lighter, dried faster, fit better. And despite all of these competitors taking swipes at Five Ten's spot atop the podium, no one has been able to knock them off their perch. Five Ten has remained the gold standard, despite some imperfections: they're heavy, especially when wet, and when wet, they take forever to dry; they aren't known for their durability, they haven't advanced the fit or the refinement as much over the years as some would like. And yet they're still the best.

Every new shoe brand and model release has us wondering if it's the one that derails Five Ten (OWN, Ride Concepts, Shimano with Michelin rubber, Giro with Vibram, Northwave with Vibram, Teva's short-lived foray, etc) and all of those shoes are great in their own right, and have their share of happy users. But when pedal comes to shoe, most of us still prefer that locked-in feel that only comes with Stealth rubber.

So, about a year and a half ago at a popular MTB festival called Crankworx that you may remember from the BC (Before Covid) days, Five Ten's somewhat unassuming booth had a couple of very assuming shoes on display. When we lifted the veil on the samples, called Trailcross, the reaction was excitement. A very polarized type of excitement.

Trailcross XT FW2020 Cut Out 2.jpg

Unlike the samples they showed earlier, the Trailcross line wasn't released in white. The Trailcross XT we tested here comes in this olive and black...

Trailcross XT FW2020 Cut Out.jpg

...or a classic black/charcoal colour scheme with subtle accents. At home on the trails or the basketball court.

Introducing the Five Ten/Adidas Trailcross XT

A few things had finally converged in those samples we saw at Crankworx, and the flat shoe wailers had been waiting for them for some time. Years ago, Five Ten was purchased by the teutonic shoe brand with the three stripes, and everyone had been waiting to see if the folks from Nürnberg would fuck it up in the ensuing years. This is not a dig at either brand - both are great at what they do - but we've all seen what happens when non-endemics come to play in our tiny little sandbox: they usually end up eating humble pie that tastes a lot like mud with tire tracks running through it.

So the little engine that was Five Ten got hitched to the giant German wagon, and we all hoped innovation and refinement would follow. Instead, years went by and nothing seemed to change all that much. Adidas launched a few Terrex-branded riding shoes, with limited success (and almost no availability) and Five Ten kept chugging along.

Which brings us to the Trailcross XT. First thing to note is that it is co-branded: the iconic three stripes appear on the tongue, complemented by the very recognizable 5.10 branding on the side of the shoe. But forget all that, let's talk about the shoe itself, because it likely isn't the one you expected, though it is surprising in a number of ways.

The latest iteration of the Adidas/Five Ten Trailcross actually comes in three versions: the LT, the XT seen here, and Mid Pro. LT is intended for warm climates, and XT is supposed to be the all-rounder - intended for all regions and climates. We'll come back to that. The Mid, which we haven't got our hands on yet (inventory continues to be an issue with Five Ten shoes) has a higher cut and a bit more protection, but to these eyes doesn't look too different than the XT. Rumoured to be coming next year is a Gore-Tex Trailcross, and can I just say that's the one a lot of us have been waiting for...forever. I have spoken to marketing and product people at several different shoe brands and still do not know why nobody has addressed that gaping hole in the market. There are flat pedals shoes that work for fat bike commuting at 30 below but not a single flat shoe that is waterproof and breathable. Note to all brands: the first to do this right is going to absolutely corner the market in the PNW, BC, and the entire UK. You're all blowing it.

Back to today's programming... The naming convention is a little strange, since the Mid Pro is actually a high top, and the XT is what I'd call a mid height shoe. Anyway, all three definitely succeed at what Five Ten & Adidas intended, which was a riding shoe that draws inspiration from a Terrex trail running shoe. 'Five Ten on the bike, Terrex for the hike' is along the lines of their propaganda line (not bad, actually). I've owned several pairs of Terrex shoes (a light trail runner and a hiking shoe) and both were truly excellent examples in their categories. So, does that translate to MTB? In short, yes. The longer answer is a bit more nuanced.

Five Ten Trail Cross XT Deniz Merdano photo1.jpg

That's definitely a trail runner profile with a mid-height cuff. Very comfortable both on and off the bike. This is a good angle to see that it doesn't have much in the way of protection and the mesh panels are quite large. Great for ventilation, not for keeping your feet warm or dry.

What is it good for?

Those trail runner looks broadcast the intended use of the Trailcross shoe line - especially the LT and the XT, which are intended for trail use as well as...bikepacking. Hold on a minute, because this actually makes sense. Anyone who's done any amount of bike packing will tell you that hike-a-bikes are not just an occasional thing. Depending on where you're BP'ing and over what kind of terrain, pushing is common. And then when you're done for the day, you're at camp, so it stands to reason you need a comfortable shoe you can wear all day and night. Yes, a Five Ten Impact or - better yet - Freerider would do the trick. But do you need that weight, toe armour and sole stiffness? You don't. But this means that at first blush, these shoes are not a first choice for the one writing this and those reading it who come to NSMB for shore-style riding. Still, this is Five Ten's first really new shoe in some time, and to these eyes the first real collaboration to come out of the Adidas partnership that looks interesting to our type.

The first thing I noticed was the light weight. Compared to the Impact Pros I've been wearing for three years now (I do not have the same durability complaints about them that others do), the Trailcross XTs are noticeably lighter. That weight has to be lost somewhere, and most notably it's in the lack of toe, heel, and forefoot protection. Depending on your needs, this may be a problem. For me, so far, it has not - but that may be luck because I've definitely used every square inch of the armour on my Impact Pros over the years. Regardless, in 25 rides or so in these kicks, I have had no issues with foot or toe strikes, and they've been used in plenty of nasty terrain. Where the lighter weight is a good thing is when pedaling. Remember that your feet, shoes, and pedals (and knee pads if you wear them around your ankles to climb) represent rotating weight. Just like your wheels and tires (but on a smaller scale), reducing that rotating weight can make a difference on longer rides.

Five Ten Trail Cross XT Deniz Merdano photo2.jpg

How do they handle the elements?

Next, the ankle gusset. I love this feature - just like I loved it in the OWN FR-01s I reviewed a few years ago. What I don't love is that the Trailcross XT's gusset simply isn't tight enough to be effective. Dirt, pebbles, and loam seem to be holding the door open for each other, and then partying in the heel cups of the shoes. In fact, it's possible that a not-tight-enough gusset works like a funnel, making it worse than a shoe with no gusset. Can not confirm. It hasn't been awful, it's just not effective.

The forefoot has mesh panels that reach back to the level of the first eyelet. This also helps with weight but also, and far more importantly, with ventilation. Recall that these shoes are intended for all day pedaling, often in warm or hot climates, not to mention routes where you'll have to cross the odd creek. Paired with the water egress ports under the forefoot, and you start to get the picture - the Trailcross XT lets in water and cold air like guests late to a dinner party - but at least they also know how to kick those guests right out again when they've overstayed their welcome. The sum of all of this is that on cold days, my feet got quite cold. On wet days, very wet. Waterproof or thick wool socks to the rescue, but for winter riding in areas that can be cold and/or wet - this is not your shoe. For long, hot days, or wet and mild ones, this is an excellent choice, with one other benefit: they dry quickly.

Five Ten Trail Cross XT Deniz Merdano photo3.jpg

The Stealth Phantom rubber works exactly as advertised.

If the Trailcross XT isn't the ideal shoe for cold or wet days, that hasn't actually stopped me from wearing them in those conditions, made much better by using them with Showers Pass waterproof socks when it's torrential. What I did appreciate in all conditions was the Stealth Phantom rubber, which delivers grip in spades. That part is no different from what you've come to expect from Five Ten over the last two decades. What was a little different was the softer flex of the sole, however I actually liked the ability to flex the sole around the contours of the different pedals I tested them with (Shimano Saint, OneUp Alloy, and Chromag Scarab). For a shoe intended to be pedaled in all day that is equally happy hiking - or hike-a-biking - this makes perfect sense. It was a relief that that didn't sacrifice their performance on the bike, though. Bruising DH or bike park shoes they are not, but that's also not what they're trying to be.

Another note on the shoe's construction that differentiates it from your typical Five Ten is that the midsole feels lighter and thinner - not to the detriment of comfort. We all know how skate shoes feel thick and bulky, right? Well the Trailcross XT feels like a trail runner or super lightweight hiking shoe in that regard. Way more comfortable on your foot in just about every situation: hiking, driving, pedaling, and drinking beer at the dumpsters after your ride. If flat shoes all have the jump on clipless togs for comfort, these things make your regular flats feel like snowboard boots.

Lastly, I found the toe box to be slightly lower in volume than a typical Five Ten, which worked well for me - YMMV so size carefully as I've heard a few grumblings from riders with wide feet.

Five Ten Trail Cross XT Deniz Merdano photo5.jpg

The heel has great lugs for traction. The Trailcross XT are as good a hiker as any riding shoe I've tried.

Not to detract from the products they've rolled out over the years - it's difficult to argue against the brand's hegemony when every flat shoe ever reviewed anywhere is compared to a Five Ten - it's just that over fifteen years it would seem like we might have expected a bit more. With the Trailcross XT, it feels as though Adidas and Five Ten are finally starting to take real steps towards building on past successes while evolving the flat shoe category to appeal to a wider group of users. If you can forego the foot armour and are looking for a flat pedal shoe suited to trail riding that will be comfortable for long days on and off the bike, the Five Ten Trailcross XT may be a good choice.

Available in sizes 6 - 15 for 165 USD / 220 CAD.

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Comments

DemonMike
+1 Pete Roggeman
mike  - Jan. 27, 2021, 8:44 p.m.

Love the shoe sock idea. Nothing worse than little rocks in the shoe. Be interesting to see how durable these are. I know my Impacts and Freeriders show way more abuse. For the duration I used them . When compared to my trusty old Shimano AM7,s from 2015.

On the subject of shoes.I just picked up a new pair of the Shimano GR9,s to replace the AM7,s. They look a lot lighter ,plus they have a similar lace cover. I like that for spring and fall riding. Helps keep the toes drier thru puddles.Plus adds some foot protection from rocks and such. The Freeriders are damn light , tacky and comfy . But soak up water like a sponge , same with the Impacts. Durable to a degree , as both my son and I had the soils fall right off them.

Looking forward to the high top version review. And to see how the long term thoughts are. One can never have enough bike gear LOL.

Reply

DemonMike
0
mike  - Jan. 27, 2021, 8:44 p.m.

This comment has been removed.

Poz
+3 mike Pete Roggeman Luke Hontz
Poz  - Jan. 27, 2021, 8:44 p.m.

I managed to snag a pair of the LTs last summer. Overall great riding flat shoe. I like the more sneaker style fit more than my old Freerides. They are significantly lighter than most riding shoes which seems odd at first. 

First ride in them was in torrential rain at Silverstar and while they soaked through (Anything would in this) they had lots of grip and just the right amount of stiffness. They are wonderful in the hot okanagan summers but definitely too light for our Colder shoulder seasons.  

Tough to get your hands on though. Like most things these days.

Reply

otagoboy
+3 Pete Roggeman AJ Barlas Luke Hontz
otagoboy  - Jan. 27, 2021, 9:34 p.m.

I’ve been using a pair of the the high top TrailCross Mid Pros over the last summer and winter here in the South Island of NZ (=wet ++). They have been great; the high tops solve your gravel funnel issue as the gaiter is much snugger. They aren’t good for keeping water out, but it drains immediately and they dry by the next day. I have found them roomy and comfortable, with D30 inserts giving added protection from rocks and pedal strikes over the heel bones. There are no significant signs of wear. When it is really wet I switch to my clipless Fizik Terra Clima X2 which have an even tighter gaiter + a waterproof membrane. Similar feel otherwise.

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pete@nsmb.com
+1 Luke Hontz
Pete Roggeman  - Jan. 28, 2021, 8:35 a.m.

Thanks for chiming in on the Mid Pros, I'm definitely keen to try them out.

I use a shoe dryer (so worth it for anyone that lives in a wet climate) but if you're on a road trip or bike packing, you may not have that luxury, so a faster drying shoe is for sure a benefit. I run clipless sometimes, too, and have several wet weather faves (Shimano MW7 and 5, Northwave Raptor GTX) but often we ride in a mix of mud and snow and in those conditions, flats are preferable for several reasons. I'm sure that now that the pants are everywhere, weather-proofed flat shoes are next. And by 'sure' I just mean 'hope'.

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MarcusJ
+2 Pete Roggeman Luke Hontz
Marcus Jarlson  - Jan. 28, 2021, 2:29 a.m.

I have the higher versions, and while I mostly run clipless, with no races this year I rode these all summer. Cant fault them really, great shoes, will probably never use any of my other fivetens again. I use a size 47 (13?) and shoes like the impact get very bulky and wide (and heavy!). These work just fine and the gaiter works on these for loose debris.

Reply

Carmel
+2 Pete Roggeman Luke Hontz
Carmel  - Jan. 28, 2021, 3:46 a.m.

As an owner of the LTs I can say that this gaiter has to be an improvement. They funnel dirt in really well in loose conditions, should have waited for the XTs to become available.
I am still pining for the GTX as well, but I have not heard any news regarding them and I fear they have been cancelled. Need to try to get insider info from adidas.

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pete@nsmb.com
+1 Carmel
Pete Roggeman  - Jan. 28, 2021, 8:37 a.m.

I don't think they're canceled. I've asked about confirmation and will report back.

Edit: mentioned below, but they're definitely coming in 2021.

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AJ_Barlas
+2 Carmel Pete Roggeman
AJ Barlas  - Jan. 28, 2021, 8:46 a.m.

I'd be very interested to hear what they say. All I can find on them is from the launch some 2 years ago. Like others, I've begun to feel they may have been cancelled. I've been hanging for them ever since the announcement. The Freerider EPS Mid is warm and waterproof but funnels water and debris in spades. After every ride I empty half of the trails into the driveway. At this pace, I'll be set for a new pumptrack in the front yard come spring!

Reply

Hollytron
0
Hollytron  - Jan. 28, 2021, 11:07 a.m.

I feel you on the freerider eps. Ride through a puddle and wait for delayed cold rush to the toes. A lace cover could solve all that.

Reply

Luke_H
+9 DanL Andy Eunson JVP Zero-cool AJ Barlas Alan McQuat Tremeer023 Pete Roggeman hongeorge
Luke Hontz  - Jan. 28, 2021, 12:30 p.m.

Hey Guys & Gals just a heads up we have not canceled the GTX. It will be available late August or September. We needed to push this shoe back a bit to create a tighter closure system around the ankle.

Reply

Morox
+1 Pete Roggeman
Brian Moreaux  - Jan. 30, 2021, 8:20 a.m.

Just gotta say to any adidas/5ten folks here, I think the Terrex Trailcross Protect is the best riding shoe I can imagine. I’ve ridden a pair as my regular riding shoe for the past 3 years and they still look new. That includes using them for bikepacking the Tour du Mont Blanc, the Oregon Timber Trail and countless local loops. 

Leaves nothing to be desired for me. Re-issue this shoe and call it good.

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hongeorge
0
hongeorge  - Feb. 3, 2021, 5:37 a.m.

Nice one - you have one definite buyer here.

Reply

hongeorge
0
hongeorge  - Feb. 3, 2021, 5:37 a.m.

Nice one - you have one definite buyer here.

Reply

jon-hillstrom
+2 Pete Roggeman Skyler
Jon Hillström  - Jan. 28, 2021, 4:28 a.m.

As a fan of the old Terrex trailcross, the brand I think would rival (and possibly beat) Five ten is Scarpa if they would make i riding focused shoe.

For now their Mojito Basic gtx (not the Mojito that has the arced sole) is actually really good goretex riding shoe. With input from Scarpa Vibram is up to the task of rubber compounds, they certainly are in the climbing world.

Margarita and Highball models also have flat enough soles to be alternatives. Uppers are super quality but they cost a bit.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
0
Pete Roggeman  - Jan. 28, 2021, 8:43 a.m.

Are these the ones you mean? https://en.scarpa.net/product/18497545/mojito-basic-gtx-maximum-comfort-a-sombre-but-concrete-style-waterproof-black-

Problems I see are that the soles are more of a hiking sole which wouldn't be flat enough to maximize grip on a flat pedal. I'm sure they're decent, but I don't think they'd be in the same realm of what we're talking here. Am a big Scarpa fan, though.

I agree that other brands with a background in climbing are likely candidates, but I think the issue is much simpler: I think that other brands working at it don't give enough credit to the importance of really sticky rubber - and if you don't test/design/ride in really wet conditions and rowdy terrain, it would be easy to conclude that something that offers ~80-90% of the amount of grip of Stealth rubber would be enough - because in a lot of conditions it IS enough. So, better and more thorough R&D and working more closely with riders in the areas that have the highest demands is what seems to be needed.

Reply

jon-hillstrom
+1 Pete Roggeman
Jon Hillström  - Jan. 29, 2021, 12:50 a.m.

Yes, those are the ones. The sole is effectively flat where the pedal nominally is under foot with room to spare. The pictures exaggerate the raised heel as the sole base is flat but the lugs are ever so slightly higher. I have no issues.

One aspect that makes them good is the lacing that can make the shoe fit really tight (like climbing tight but comfy) that effectively stiffens the feel of the shoe without having super hard soles. Loose fitting skate style shoes warp in the uppers and get all their stiffness from the sole while the Basics fit make the uppers come into play. They are abit like oldschool cyclo cross shoes for clips but without the cleats for running.

Sole grip is better than a lot of non 5.10 riding shoes, not quite supertacky but still (approach)climbing grade stickiness that some other riding shoes (like Teva and Vans) didn´t have. 

I have not tried the high top model but those could be really sweet as well.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
0
Pete Roggeman  - Jan. 29, 2021, 7:51 a.m.

That's a lot of useful info and enough to make me curious to try them - thanks!

Reply

AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Jan. 28, 2021, 8:43 a.m.

Very interesting find on the Scarpa alternatives, Jon. I'm gonna look into those, Thanks!

Reply

Timer
+1 Pete Roggeman
Timer  - Jan. 28, 2021, 9:54 a.m.

La Sportiva would be another contender for excellent riding shoes if they could be bothered. They are pretty close already. Top of the line climbing rubber, the flattish sole of the TX2 and the tough uppers of the TX4 or Boulder (add the Mid shaft and/or GTX to taste).

Reply

jon-hillstrom
+1 Pete Roggeman
Jon Hillström  - Jan. 29, 2021, 1 a.m.

Yes, for sure! I would say the Ganda model might also be in it but TX2 might be the best option right now.

Reply

Vikb
+1 Pete Roggeman
Vik Banerjee  - Jan. 28, 2021, 5:44 a.m.

I snagged a pair of the LTs thinking they could be the perfect bikepacking footwear, but they are so light/flexible I didn't like them for trail riding or even hiking. Just too little structure/support for HABing for me anyways and as you note HABing is inevitable. Out of the 5.10 lineup I like the OG Freerider for bikepacking the most. It's not a super burly shoe. Easy to ride, walk and HAB in. The only downside is it doesn't dry fast if you are wading through creeks or dealing with rain.

I also snagged a NOS pair of the Addida Trailcross shoes which are no longer made. I like them better as a bikepacking shoe as they have more support/structure than the LT, but of course I can't get another pair. Story of my life.

Reply

hongeorge
+4 Pete Roggeman JVP AJ Barlas Nologo
hongeorge  - Jan. 28, 2021, 6:15 a.m.

Really grates that they've managed to release three versions of this shoe, but the mythical gore-tex version for winter riding that they previewed years ago still hasn't arrived.  A five ten shoe with a waterproof neoprene sleeve is the holy graill for a lot of us winter weather types

Reply

mrbrett
+2 Pete Roggeman Luke Hontz
mrbrett  - Jan. 28, 2021, 6:41 a.m.

Your review, including the potential pitfalls of this shoe, sound like my wishlist. My chubby ankles that look a little like I'm having a minor allergic reaction would fill out that cuff. I have a pair of Impact Highs for really rough riding. It's dry where I live; I don't need no Gore Tex.

So I'm sitting here, cheering and throwing cash money and debit cards at my screen and nothing is happening. This is exactly the shoe I want but I can't seem to find any of these hen's teeth in existence. Where, oh where, could I see a pair of these dream shoes to try them on and buy? My local retailers have lots of alternative things like RC, or older and more proven models of 5.10 but no Trailcross XT.

I have had 5.10s fairly consistently since '04-05 or so, save for the odd wandering eye, and the worst part of them as far as I'm concerned is spotty availability.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+1 mrbrett
Pete Roggeman  - Jan. 28, 2021, 8:45 a.m.

I think it's mostly a Covid thing but also know that Adidas Outdoor changed their fulfillment provider in the US and I think that's led to issues with inventory - but I'm speculating.

Anyway, keep looking and maybe talk to a local shop who might be able to shed light. I imagine stock will be arriving into warehouses soon...fingers crossed.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
+1 mrbrett
AJ Barlas  - Jan. 28, 2021, 8:50 a.m.

"I'm sitting here, cheering and throwing cash money and debit cards at my screen and nothing is happening."

I hate when that happens! :)

Reply

Luke_H
+2 mrbrett Pete Roggeman
Luke Hontz  - Jan. 28, 2021, 12:44 p.m.

I am sorry you are having problems finding our shoes, our inventory got hit double hard this year. We had higher demand than ever and we were also trying to clear out one warehouse and move things to another.Things should be much easier to find in 2021.

Reply

mrbrett
+2 Luke Hontz Pete Roggeman
mrbrett  - Jan. 28, 2021, 6:51 p.m.

That's good, because I like the shoes and think it's worth the effort of a hunt to get them. I will keep looking as spring booking orders start arriving at the local shops.

Reply

JohnnyRyall
+1 Pete Roggeman
John Royal  - Jan. 28, 2021, 6:42 a.m.

I live in the southeastern US and found the Trailcross LT's to be a godsend last summer in our hot, humid conditions.  I still slightly prefer the feel and fit of my Impacts (which I still use in the cooler months), but the much, much better ventilated Trailcross shoes are so much better in hot weather.  They are significantly cooler during the ride and always dry by the next morning for the next day's ride.  Nothing is quite so unappealing as putting on still sweat-soaked shoes the next morning...

Reply

JVP
+3 Pete Roggeman ManInSteel Nologo
JVP  - Jan. 28, 2021, 8:28 a.m.

I'm just here for news about the GoreTex version.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+4 AJ Barlas JVP mike Nologo
Pete Roggeman  - Jan. 28, 2021, 8:44 a.m.

I hope to have the news you seek...soon!

Reply

DemonMike
+1 Pete Roggeman
mike  - Jan. 28, 2021, 6:22 p.m.

What has become of OWN . Their 1st shoe looked very promising . And they were doing a 2nd design. I guess Covid has taken it,s toll as well. Speaking of taking it's toll. At one store today. Shelves empty or bare. I asked you restocking for season change ? His response was No , we are returning products and going from 40+ different companies/brands . Down to 19 companies/brands.

Reply

andy-eunson
+1 mike
Andy Eunson  - Jan. 28, 2021, 8:48 p.m.

I think they’re done. I was on their website last fall. All on sale but minimal sizing and they don’t ship to Canada. I didn’t get them. I bought some Freerider Pros. Working pretty well for me.

Reply

DemonMike
0
mike  - Jan. 28, 2021, 10:45 p.m.

Ya I was looking for a pair. They only had odd sizes and white for colour.I read somewhere they were blowing out old stock. And had a new version in the works. Maybe that was the plan. And 2020 happened .

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+1 mike
Pete Roggeman  - Jan. 29, 2021, 7:54 a.m.

I'll send them a note. I had been checking in once a year to see if they were going to produce a clipless shoe. The originals were well-received but it was two guys running the show who had other jobs and I think the struggle was real to advance the brand and balance profits and pricing - tough for a small brand in a competitive and challenging marketplace.

Reply

bernd-brookes-brugger
+3 ManInSteel Pete Roggeman JVP
Bernd Brookes Brugger  - Jan. 28, 2021, 1:20 p.m.

Can‘t remember where I have read it, but the Gore Tex was pushed back to autumn this year according to another bike page. I googled a few shop and they also had changed to August 22nd as new availability date.

Edit: Found it.

https://www.scotbycycles.co.uk/products/five-ten-trailcross-gxt-mountain-biking-shoes?variant=32460099256404

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ManInSteel
0
ManInSteel  - Jan. 28, 2021, 2:08 p.m.

Thank you for the info!  

I will be the first to buy this GTX version....but hope the price won't be that scary.

Reply

JVP
+1 Pete Roggeman
JVP  - Jan. 28, 2021, 3:41 p.m.

I'd found that link a while ago, but they've been bumped a few times, so we'll see.

Pete, you absolutely nailed it: "Note to all brands: the first to do this right is going to absolutely corner the market in the PNW, BC, and the entire UK. You're all blowing it."

I also have a few friends that commute (or did pre-Covid) in flats. Because why bother with anti-errand clip-ins when you're going a mellow 30 minutes each way? GoreTex would be awesome for them.

I'm >>this<< close to buying some light Goretex hikers that can be re-soled and putting a flat approach or fly fishing sole on them. Saw the fly fishing thing in NSMB comments last week. Hmmm.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+2 Carmel JVP
Pete Roggeman  - Jan. 29, 2021, 7:55 a.m.

Yeah that's an interesting thought but it shouldn't be necessary!

Also, can confirm after contact from Five Ten that the GTX model is a go for fall '21!

Reply

andrewbikeguide
+1 Pete Roggeman
AndrewR  - Jan. 28, 2021, 4:51 p.m.

A surprise "this holds a flat pedal better than I expected it to" shoe is the Goretex Arcteryx Aerios FL Mid GTX. It is without a doubt the best fitting shoe I have ever had (like a climbing shoe but without the pain). They have zero bump protection and I would be careful about catching the fabric on pedal pins. Zero thermal insulation as they are so thin and fitted but good for a careful walk through a three inch deep puddle.

My other flat pedal favourite that defeats trail debris ingress is the Shimano GR7. It hikes well, breathes okay, defeats mild damp and dries quickly. They will take a thick merino sock or a Seal skin/ Showers Pass waterproof sock for the really wet days.

A mid winter flat pedal surprise (only because I do not not skateboard or snow board so this is a brand/ segment that is lost to me) which I bought for cold weather fat biking, but would be a good wet/ cold weather ride, is the Vans Standard Mid MTE boot. 100 grams of insulation and a grippy sole (on snow and wet rock) but still able to feel the pedal through the sole in a good way.

It is going to be interesting to see what FiveTen/ Adidas develop but there is a wealth of good options out there at the moment.

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