New posts

Pole Machine - machined goodness or folly?

Nov. 27, 2017, 1:19 a.m.
Posts: 631
Joined: Dec. 5, 2004

Couldnt find any mention about the new cnc-machined Pole. Residing in a neighbouring country to Finland I´m kind of excited. They claim 100% made and assembled in Finland and all metal shavings etc recycled.

Price is about the same as for other super high end frames. A lot of talk about environmental stuff on here so I thought I´d post this.

https://youtu.be/ZNAxkr6y_TY

http://enduro-mtb.com/en/pole-machine-superbike/

https://polebicycles.com/machine/

Nov. 27, 2017, 11:18 a.m.
Posts: 765
Joined: June 29, 2006

If the glued together part works and lasts, I will buy one in a couple of years.

It’s the most beautiful mtb I’ve ever seen.

And I am serious. It’s so rad I’d almost cancel my preordered Rallon 29.

Almost only though, so far it’s vaporware and has to proof it’s durability first.

The bike biz taught me that much.


 Last edited by: Znarf on Nov. 27, 2017, 11:20 a.m., edited 1 time in total.
Nov. 27, 2017, 1:53 p.m.
Posts: 14415
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

http://enduro-mtb.com/en/pole-evolink-140-29-review/

Nov. 27, 2017, 4:56 p.m.
Posts: 875
Joined: March 18, 2017

Says recommended 170-180mm fork.  When someone finds one let me know!  Only one I've seen so far is the 36 RC2 Orange lower model and a Formula Nero R dual crown.  Both 51mm offset.

Nov. 27, 2017, 7:41 p.m.
Posts: 198
Joined: March 6, 2017

Lyrik comes in a 180 29er I think. Either way, buddy is riding A fork in the video so they do exist.

Nov. 28, 2017, 9:58 a.m.
Posts: 6
Joined: July 18, 2017

https://www.amazon.com/RockShox-Travel-DebonAir-Control-Tapered/dp/B072DYPHB2/ref=sr_1_fkmr1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1511891742&sr=8-1-fkmr1&keywords=rockshox+lyrik+29+180+mm

https://www.amazon.com/RockShox-Lyrik-Position-Boost-Offset/dp/B072JKDHKD/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1511891869&sr=8-6&keywords=rockshox+lyrik+29

Nov. 28, 2017, 11:23 a.m.
Posts: 4855
Joined: Nov. 25, 2002

love the design / concept. some proper innovation going on. nice to see some exotic alternatives to carbon. frame only price of $4200 + whatever duties is certainly eye opening - though i've no doubt cnc machining something that large is going to be a pricey endeavor. looking forward to seeing how it shakes out.

Nov. 28, 2017, 9:49 p.m.
Posts: 2154
Joined: Jan. 10, 2003

CNC machining a frame seems like an insane waste of resources (recycling the chips notwithstanding).

The finished product looks pretty incredible though, more lust worthy than any of the current carbon frames in my eyes.

Nov. 29, 2017, 5:50 a.m.
Posts: 198
Joined: March 6, 2017

Being a machinist I have a few assumptions with this frame. The first being that given the amount of time to machine this frame, they must do lights out. Set it up and hit run then go home. Let the machine do its thing all night. The second is that the frame must start as a forging instead of just a block of aluminum. Machining a whole block would take so much time and effort nevermind the distortion from removing that much material.

Nov. 29, 2017, 6 a.m.
Posts: 2300
Joined: Sept. 5, 2012

the wonders of hi speed machining , with right machine and programming they could produce them pretty quick , and if they are using a stamped forging that would be even faster on the milling end , we have a mill at work that reads code 1000lines ahead , when running a Volumill program you can,t even read the code it,s moving so fast on the screen .

Nov. 29, 2017, 6:25 a.m.
Posts: 960
Joined: Feb. 28, 2014

T-Mack, my machinist buddy, whom you know, says that without forging, this frame will be either too weak or too heavy. Weak, because of the grain structure of aluminum and the inherent weak spots. Heavy, as they won't be able to machine enough material out to maintain strength. Can they efficiently forge blocks that big? Can they mass produce a product with that much machine time?

And this whole environmental push they are trying to create is a real funny one, as they probably don't realize the huge footprint that mining metals entails... and that's just from mining trucks alone. Pound for pound, I would guess that carbon fiber actually has less of an impact from a manufacturing stand point.

Nov. 29, 2017, 8:53 a.m.
Posts: 198
Joined: March 6, 2017

Posted by: Lowcard

T-Mack, my machinist buddy, whom you know, says that without forging, this frame will be either too weak or too heavy. Weak, because of the grain structure of aluminum and the inherent weak spots. Heavy, as they won't be able to machine enough material out to maintain strength. Can they efficiently forge blocks that big? Can they mass produce a product with that much machine time?

And this whole environmental push they are trying to create is a real funny one, as they probably don't realize the huge footprint that mining metals entails... and that's just from mining trucks alone. Pound for pound, I would guess that carbon fiber actually has less of an impact from a manufacturing stand point.

Yeah I mean, honestly I'd really love to know how the frames start off. I just can't see the frames being profitable if they're starting from a solid block of aluminum nor have the proper properties like you said. 7000 series is a different animal from 6000 series so it is tough to say. 6000 series you heat treat then bend to get rid of warpage right after as the grains are all in the proper direction. Interesting stuff.

Nov. 29, 2017, 5:46 p.m.
Posts: 875
Joined: March 18, 2017

Has anyone else found an info on "ocean-fill" besides the Pole article?

Nov. 29, 2017, 6:06 p.m.
Posts: 198
Joined: March 6, 2017

Posted by: Endur-Bro

Has anyone else found an info on "ocean-fill" besides the Pole article?

I think we can all agree that 'cancelled' carbon bike never even existed and the whole song and dance was to build hype for this bike. That being said, you have to commend them on creating a memorable campaign.

Nov. 29, 2017, 6:48 p.m.
Posts: 1770
Joined: May 23, 2006

Posted by: T-mack

6000 series you heat treat then bend to get rid of warpage right after as the grains are all in the proper direction.

Uh, first the surface table then the oven. Preferably right after welding while material's still soft and malleable.


 Last edited by: tungsten on Nov. 29, 2017, 6:59 p.m., edited 1 time in total.

Forum jump: