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andy-eunson's posts

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Oct. 3, 2022, 2:06 p.m.
Posts: 564
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: XO1 Eagle shifting is stiff.

I worked a little Prolink into the clutch. Type 3 so there’s a plastic cover that comes off. It’s smother now and with actual Shimano housing and new cable it’s like buttah as it should be. Thanks for the back up folks.

Oct. 3, 2022, 12:42 p.m.
Posts: 564
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: XO1 Eagle shifting is stiff.

Oh yeah. The clutch. The stiff shifting derailleur’s clutch is stiffer. I think back in the spring one of the derailleurs had a stiff clutch. I removed the cover and dribbled some oil in it and worked it back and forth a bunch. I’ll try again and if not maybe source out a derailleur. I got a couple cables and actual Shimano housing to try too.

Oct. 3, 2022, 9:18 a.m.
Posts: 564
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: Incident on Cypress WuTang on Wednesday

Posted by: RAHrider

My wife and I moved to Vancouver in 2004. We both comment to one another how lucky we feel to have experienced vancouver at that time. We used to ride squamish a lot. This was pre University. You had to park at the golf course and ride up the road. We'd rarely see another biker. There were far fewer trails but they were all excellent fun. Pseudo pseuga was single-track and there wasn't a berm on it. Biking there back then was such a different experience to what it is now. 

We also remember having to go into local shops and buy maps (or have them hand drawn) when going to New areas. Growth and development has some advantages but I have to say, leaving Vancouver always feels good. I recently took a Jon in terrace and although I haven't actually had a chance to bike here, I hear it's amazing and I really can't wait. I love riding in towns this size that are not mtb destinations. 

I actually blaim enduro racing for some of the changes we see in the attitudes of riders on the shore. It used to be that shuttle trails would attract a lot of the assholes. Pedal bikes weren't as capable and so attracted less meat head types. Enduro racing attracts a very wide ranging group and brings them all under the same umbrella and onto the same trails. I hate it when I hear about riders doing ignorant rude shit like this. I liked it better when they were a very different group than mine wearing hockey pads and riding different trails. Now it looks bad on all of us! 

Thanks for raising awareness about this and speaking up.

In other words, perhaps this growth that we are told we need to keep out sport healthy is bullshit or at least needs some thought beyond "more is better". I’ve seen the parking areas in Squamish on nice days, I’ve been at the top of Lord of the Squirrels where there were about 50 riders milling about, I hear from hiking friends how many people he sees in North Van and how pounded the trails are, permit system in Garibaldi Park, no dogs at Joffrey to limit user numbers.

Oct. 3, 2022, 9:10 a.m.
Posts: 564
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: XO1 Eagle shifting is stiff.

Posted by: Kenny

B tension?

Yeah. I let the air out of the shock, squish to about 30% and lay and floor with my light and set it. It must be cable and housing. Each individual component seems fine when tested by itself even the cable and housing but I think sometimes what feels good in the hand sometimes is enough perhaps combined with something else to make it feel like crap. I’ll get new housing and cables today later and see.

Oct. 2, 2022, 6:54 p.m.
Posts: 564
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: XO1 Eagle shifting is stiff.

Posted by: Hepcat

Downshift problems makes me think cables, somehow? Housing few weeks old and a fresh cable though, hmm.

Shimano housing and cable? Btw I was always told to run the cables dry to avoid contamination.

Just pulled the Jagwire housing and cables off mine for Shimano, massive difference.

My Sram stuff was much more tolerant of cable issues than Shimano because of the straighter routing through the rollamajig though.

Hanger straight?

Same here. Yeah hanger is straight. I checked that too. With no wheel in the derailleurs on each bike feel the same when pushed in by hand. Upshifting (to higher gears) is perfect. If I could get Shimano housing I would. No one carries  it it seems. Just Jagwire. Must be cable and housing. I’ll change it tomorrow and see. There are threaded holes under the top tube for bolt on crap. I’ll bet I can fashion some cable guides from thin plastic and zip tie the balance along the seat stay and see if that’s any better. 

XXX I can’t remember if the bike shifted like the hardtail when new. It’s four and a half years and I can’t remember. I think the hardtail has always been better. It has perfect routing really.

Oct. 2, 2022, 4:09 p.m.
Posts: 564
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
XO1 Eagle shifting is stiff.

I have two XO1 drivetrains. The five year old one on the hardtail is like butter. The four year old one is quite stiff across all cogs but especially downshifting to the 42 and 50. If I detach the cable the shifter and housing seem fine. Cable and housing are about a month old and cassette, chain and ring 3 weeks. The derailleur seems to go across its full range by hand when the wheel is out. Lubricated pivots, changed just the cable last night, fiddled with b tension back and forth with the red spacing tool and without just to see. The hardtail housing curves around the left side smoothly then a straight shot down the top tube and seat tube to the derailleur. The Trek Remedy is inside the downtube, gently up and over the bb shell into the chainstay but the exit to the derailleur seems a bit tight to me. But it is what it is. I don’t recall the shifting being this bad when new. It was always a bit stiffer than the Chameleon I think because of the cable routing. When I shoved the new cable down the three week old housing I preceded that with a little tri flow and the cable went in easily all the way. Cleaned and lubed the roll a ma jig too. I might remove the housing and set it up again just to see what a straight line routing might do. 

Any other suggestions?

Sept. 30, 2022, 9:18 p.m.
Posts: 564
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: Bars with backsweep

Posted by: BC_Nuggets

So I just started using a PNW Range which has 10-degrees backsweep and I've got to say, despite being only 2-degrees more backsweep than the Fubar OSX I was on, it seems to be the sweet spot for wrist comfort and still getting the elbows out in techy stuff.  Still need to fine tune cockpit, stem spacers, possible trimming but most of that's because of a slightly higher rise and being 800mm compared to the 770 my Chromag was at.  I might even go from 60mm stem back to 50mm.

Suffice to say 10-degrees is noticeably more comfortable for me.

I just did the same swap on both my bikes. One bar had three years and was retired. I like my bikes set up as sme as possible so two bars and a set of their XL grips for each as well. A subtle difference but a difference. The 8° bars had some pressure on my hands on the thumb side which is lessened with the 10° bars.  I like 750 width on the squishy bike and 740 on the hardtail. My hands don’t seem to fall asleep the same. I’ll see in coming days on longer rides if the hands stay awake.

Sept. 30, 2022, 9:10 a.m.
Posts: 564
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: NSMB - 2022 - Hardtail Thread...

Posted by: BC_Nuggets

Do you guys/gals/other use the lock-out function on your forks often?  I would probably use mine on long paved climbs to the trail head if it wasn't for the one time I used it in the past I swear (and maybe it was my imagination) it seemed to be sticky and not work well after I stopped using the lockout (ie turned it back to fully open.)  Seemed off until I got the lowers serviced.  Was I imagining things?  It's an older 34 float (RLC...yeah it goes back a ways.)

I used to not really be concerned about lockout but I must admit it could be useful on some occasions.

Never. I figure if your fork is bobbing you need a coach. It will bob sprinting and standing but so what. But fork movement while spinning along on the flats or climbs while seated is from body movement. Plus as others have said, switches get left on or off at the wrong times. I don’t know how many times I went down something with my TALAS fork set at 120 instead of 160 and thought my fork felt harsh.

Sept. 29, 2022, 11:37 a.m.
Posts: 564
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: ebikes on the Shore

Posted by: syncro

Posted by: andy-eunson

My point is just that growth with ebikes (or regular bikes) needs some thought. Most trail systems rely heavily on volunteer efforts. If ebikes mean more trail use, maintenance and building needs to be addressed in some way. Big picture, philosophically I am anti growth. Pro sustainability.

Yup, big picture thinking.  More riders means we need more trails and, more importantly, more people doing trail work. If ebike riders are getting shunned by the greater mtb community then the likelihood of them getting involved with trail maintenance and advocacy is probably pretty low. That doesn't work for anyone in the bigger picture when it looks like ebikes are here to stay and will be a significant part of the trail using public.

I would suspect that the percentage of ebikes being contributing members of local trail organizations is pretty similar to that of regular bikers. Ebikes are here nd not going anywhere. We need to deal with them as the legitimate trail users that they are. That doesn’t mean that I want one. It won’t make my rides any better it will cost more and be more complex to work on and I don’t want that.

Sept. 28, 2022, 9:39 p.m.
Posts: 564
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: ebikes on the Shore

Posted by: RAHrider

Really? 10 speed MANUAL transmissions? Sure automatic, who cares. 12 speed manual transmission with no clutch and the potential to ruin the transmission if you shift while pushing to many watts? As I have always said, ebikes are some of the crappiest engineered products out there. Cables everywhere. Delicate drivetrains. Too many gears. I digress as I know some people here really like riding them. I'm sure they think my bike with no suspension is equally underengineered.

Just in big trucks are there manual 10 speeds. For cars and light duty trucks no.

Sept. 28, 2022, 9:32 p.m.
Posts: 564
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: ebikes on the Shore

Posted by: syncro

If people are going to get upset because an ebiker is getting in more laps and degrading the trails then they also have to dislike more people going riding on regular bikes cause that causes more wear on the trails too. It’s hypocritical to dislike increased wear from one group and not dislike it from another.

I hear you breathing son. But being human powered is a great limiter. My point is just that growth with ebikes (or regular bikes) needs some thought. Most trail systems rely heavily on volunteer efforts. If ebikes mean more trail use, maintenance and building needs to be addressed in some way. Overuse of parks like Joffrey and Garibaldi created the need for a permit system. That’s not an unusual thing in the world. I can easily foresee a permit system for parking at first as a way to limit trail use.  Big picture, philosophically I am anti growth. Pro sustainability. This endless economic and population growth is insane.

Sept. 28, 2022, 5:56 p.m.
Posts: 564
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: ebikes on the Shore

The emotional responses on either side are not really helpful in ebike discussions. My first reactions to ebike were emotional really and I get that on both sides but it’s divisive like politics. I’m trying to keep the knee jerk emotional reaction out now. The real issue that doesn’t get discussed often is how more riders riding longer, further or more laps might impact all trail users. We are told it’s a good way to grow the sport but do we want growth? The prime reason for ebikes if for riders to be able to ride more in a given amount of time. The target market is not old people or the sick and infirm but young people with enough money. I tend to ride places that don’t see a lot of traffic due to the trails not being well known or they are hard to get to.

Here in Whistler Vail is building two higher capacity lifts at Creekside and more next year at the Village side. Vail knows the ski business but I don’t think they know skiing. Most skiers I know would rather wait in a lift line than wait to to ski down in a crowd. More terrain is a better way to increase capacity. So with ebikes we will need to increase the number of trails and perform more maintenance of existing trails as higher traffic will require more work. And think about the parking issues we already have in Squamish and North Vancouver already.

Sept. 28, 2022, 5:47 p.m.
Posts: 564
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: ebikes on the Shore

Posted by: RAHrider

Posted by: heckler

Posted by: Hepcat

Posted by: heckler

I’ve heard this from a certified (usually on a pedal bike) instructor, who only realized her new to mtb students on their E-bikes did not use the shifter to climb a change in grade.  Only the power up button.  

She only realized this once she borrowed a powered bike cuz hers was down at Suspensionwerx. 

The lesson quickly changed to shifting.

This is hilarious. We went out while on vacation this summer on e-bikes for some mellow trail riding with a guide, the most emphasized instruction was to not use the shifters at all, just put it in turbo. 😆

I guess there is a difference between an E-bike tour guide and a certified MTB Instructor.

If I had a tour group on ebikes I would tell them to crank the power rather than shifting under the pedalling force of them + their 500w motor. Seems like a no Brainer for noobs on rented ebikes.

Also, who has ever heard of motorized transportation with a 12 speed transmission. They should make it three speeds - uphill, downhill and flat.

Well my 8 year old Audi has 8 speeds. I think the Honda Ridgeline is a 9 speed. Pretty sure there are 10 speed car and truck transmissions too.

Sept. 27, 2022, 8:10 p.m.
Posts: 564
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: So I’ve done a short mullet experiment.

Posted by: xy9ine

i mulleted my meta (just to see what all the hype was about), and the primary difference (unsurprisingly) was ease of initiating manuals. which translates a bit to easier corner exit manuals & what kinda/sorta feels like a more snappy exit once the cornering forces have transferred from front to rear. that said, i've found a couple full 29" bikes with the same reach - but with 10mm longer rear centers - were subjectively faster in corners. so my seat of pants experience suggests that front / rear balance is more impactful to cornering than wheelsize. but mullet can impart a wee bit of fun factor, which is always a good thing. a bit lighter wheel / tire is a nice bonus as well.

Being 5’4" what is this ‘manual’ of which you speak?

Sept. 27, 2022, 5:08 p.m.
Posts: 564
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: COVID-19

Today I feel just fine. So one night and day feeling a bit off. Like someone beat the shit out of me with a wiffle bat. Not that bad.

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