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tehllama42's posts

26 posts found

Sept. 11, 2018, 8:17 p.m.
Posts: 26
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: long travel wagon wheelers

Posted by: cam@nsmb.com

The biggest difference in the new Yetis (beside the water bottle!) is reach. The new large is 480.2 while the 5.5 was 442. That's huge and very positive. I also appreciate the shorter seat mast. Some are complaining about the squashed head tube but that's not a big issue for me. I already loved the 5.5 despite its foibles so I'm pretty excited about the SB 150. And whatever else might be just around the corner... said the guy who doesn't know anything.

I feel almost bad looking at the new Yetis - because I'm already rocking a 150/130mm travel 29er with 481mm reach.
It's a 2014 Rocky Instinct, and I could set fire to it and buy a new one with carbon everything for the same price as the GX build... and it has room for two water bottles plus a full complement of bro-duro spares for repairs inside the front triangle.

If I want to go bananas (probably will eventually), I'll just get an Avalanche kit to coil front and rear, move it to a 160/140 bike, and laugh all the way down the mountain (admittedly after wheezing the whole way up).

March 12, 2018, 7:51 p.m.
Posts: 26
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: Bell, Giro and the AR-15

Posted by: cam@nsmb.com

Just about to bring Uncle Dave's voice to this shitshow. Did anyone notice how many NRA members gang-banged our Facebook post for our article? Those dudes hunt in pack.

[/quote]In some ways, it's like being surprised that launching a rocket into a thunderstorm with copper wire attached causes a lightning strike. I haven't had time to wade in, but having people from different bubbles talk past each other is seldom productive.

Feb. 27, 2018, 4:42 p.m.
Posts: 26
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: Bell, Giro and the AR-15

Thanks for the well thought out reply, I'm probably in the same boat.

Feb. 25, 2018, 6:41 p.m.
Posts: 26
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: Bell, Giro and the AR-15

There are a decent number of cases of firearms being used successfully in self-defense. It's not as frequent as [anybody selling you products based on that extremely unlikely event of a home invasion] most pro-2A sources would have one believe (2.5million per year is unrealistically high), but per FBI sources that are deliberately low-ball, that figure is around 66,000 cases per year. Not trivial at all, especially when compared to incidence rates of gun violence outside of impoverished areas.

More guns will mean more gun deaths - although statistically the person in most danger of being killed by a firearm is its owner. Accidental gun deaths are the same thing, and that hurts my especially because many of those are preventable. If we're going to be a country with as many guns as citizens, I don't see why a rudimentary gun safety class isn't part of elementary school curriculum (the recommended course basically consists of: Stop. Don't touch. Leave the Area. Tell an Adult), but there exists pushback against that because some people think it would normalize gun ownership (in a country that has 300million guns...).

I live in New Mexico, where the leading cause of death after obesity-inducing unhealthy life choices is death by drunk driver, so I don't even assume the idiots I drive around are sober and insured. Even with that generally low opinion of people who occupy my immediate area, those who choose to own guns seem to actually be less idiotic on aggregate.

In its original conception, the second amendment was predicated on the idea that having privately owned arms would limit power usurpation of the government and keep it as a government 'by the people and for the people', but with the side goal of having additional weaponry available in case we were invaded by a foreign power... but it's not like a foreign army would ever march into the US, and say burn Washington DC to the ground or anything, EH?

There are already schools with those safety precautions in place. Mostly poor areas, and to boot those are really overcrowded schools with poor parental buy-in to the teaching process. Having that widespread seems both dumb and a waste, but there are already areas where pragmatically that has to be the answer.

Guns are efficient tools, though numerically rifles in terms of total deaths (to include justifiable homicide) trail behind things like knives, blunt objects, and cars. No way around the intention of guns as designed, it's to cause damage at a distance, and to do so repeatedly because hitting anything with a high velocity projectile from a tube of steel and crudely installed amount of gunpowder is hard. My answer to anybody whinging about 'high capacity' magazines is to look at the statistics of even law enforcement successfully hitting what they're aiming at (circa 18%), and see if my explanation of how little in a terminal ballistics sense being able to get one or two impacts with a relatively small caliber achieves in a self-defense situation.  The practical answer is that most guns are still optimized around hunting, with the side effect of making somebody with one a more difficult target for assault than somebody who is unarmed, so for dealing with the stupidity biased criminal element, they work.  In practice, murder innocent and defenseless people can be achieved more quickly with cheaper tools, the only things guns improve for somebody looking to do that is the speed with which one can murder people.

Summary - if you accept the tenet that an armed populace can function as somewhat of a deterrent for anybody with schemes of despotic or even plutocratic rule, then weapons with approximate parity of weaponry with the weapons that would be used by a police state is a requisite. I can't state that is is an apodictic truth, but it's something that the founders of the USA felt so strongly about that the majority chose not to put it into the constitution because they felt it was so self-evident that it didn't bear stating, and added it as the second amendment because they realized how much federalizing aspects of government could concentrate both wealth and power.
There are downsides to this, I won't pretend they're not, but the practical answer is that if law-abiding citizens in the US were the problem, having 300 million guns among them it would be much more noticeable. The problems actually do emerge when weapons amplify the tragic effects of other things, and finding ways to prevent and/or minimize that is hard, but an area where we should be doing better with the tools we have but don't (as an example, the NICS system that should function for background checks is not integrated, is poorly ran and overseen, perpetually under-budget, and isn't easily accessible for private sales - the last one is particularly stupid). A fix there would be tremendously helpful. My answer to school shootings is to add school resource officers, but also enable teachers who voluntarily want to go through a LOT of extra training and screening to be able to extent their CCW permits to their shcools, but that's a small thing not really much of a fix in the big picture. The idea of gun-free zones is silly to me - to put it in MTB terms it's like posting signs and being shocked that bikers would poach trails - but instead of upstanding and overall moral human beings (I presume MTBers to be), we're talking about people already willing to murder others, so keeping law-abiding persons out feels particularly pointless.

Didn't get to ride, but did spend lots of time building racing drones (my other obsession that involves paying too much for nice carbon fiber things that I will subsequently ruin by smashing into things out of incompetence).

As for eMTB's - as long as it doesn't create access issues, those things should be awesome... but as it stands right now they create access issues if allowed onto trails reserved for non-motorized transport. They could share trails with horses, and I live next to an awesome network of trails that are already moto-accessible, but would make an ideal location to ride eMTBs... I just want to take some of the electronic controllers from drones (really similar devices) and fix the overrun issues when you stop pedaling, and manage the specific battery usage through a better P-I-D controller to make it feel more like natural pedaling and compensate for a bike that is running beefy tires.

Feb. 24, 2018, 8:58 a.m.
Posts: 26
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: Bell, Giro and the AR-15

Posted by: Mic

Posted by: tehllama42

FWIW, this moved me towards purchasing stuff from them. A lot (staggering amounts of well heeled rednecks) of people will think similarly, but not many will go voice it on a Canadian biking forum.

So you think that it is ok for US primary school kids and teenagers to have to live in a country that is at times as dangerous when it comes to school shootings and/or rifle attacks as Afghanistan, Yemen and Pakistan?

Being in the extreme minority of people who have spent time in both US primary schools and Afghan primary schools, the comparison is laughable, and I'd charitably describe that comparison as just ignorant at best. The AO we worked and lived out of (we inherited it from a British/Canadian coalition - those dudes are awesome) had a major feature - a primary school for girls, and it was the best Taliban magnet we had, because even those retards do manage to comprehend that literate girls become thoughtful and difficult to oppress women, which shuts off their supply to illiterate and easy to radicalize teenagers willing to blow themselves up inside a group of children...  Even a rudimentary understanding of statistics tells you how different an experience those two things are.

The notion that you would assume promptly that I'm a trogoldytic NRA shill is cute... People who own firearms are far more motivated than others to try and get this crap to stop happening (so that panic buys on materials, poorly crafted legislation, and other stupidity can stop affecting something we do predominately for fun). Even more so for individuals like me looking to find improvements to the education system at large (this is my dissertation topic), idiotic violence affecting schools will continue to force oversized and overfilled facilities for kids in order to amortize security and logistics costs instead of getting that focus onto delivering better educational content.

I'm here, happy to have intelligent discussion (I've been around NSMB since before the server migration, and I'm here because this is a nexus of useful and intelligent thought relating to how to set up and use mountain bikes that actually get ridden... If there isn't any hope of that then I'll spend my time elsewhere on the forum, or go back to refining giant tomes on how to apply modern model-based engineering methodologies to mountain bikes for fun.

Feb. 23, 2018, 7:19 p.m.
Posts: 26
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: Bell, Giro and the AR-15

FWIW, this moved me towards purchasing stuff from them. A lot (staggering amounts of well heeled rednecks) of people will think similarly, but not many will go voice it on a Canadian biking forum.

Dec. 11, 2017, 8:42 p.m.
Posts: 26
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: Looking for some input.

Evenly mixed, if you look at all the results.  Both solutions for wheel diameter work well, just in different ways.  For taller guys, bigger wheels will feel more natural to a larger fraction of people because of the proportionality of those, but somebody wanting agility and travel for chunk may still prefer smaller wheels (conversely some riders prefer wagon wheels no matter what). 

They roll things differently, with different characteristic feels. Big wheels have lower attack angles and tend to feel smoother over moderately rough stuff because less peak energy is involved in getting out of the way, but more unsprung mass and a lankier bike is always a tradeoff. Same deal with feeling in the bike (more bottom bracket drop) versus on the bike (less bb drop, but can initiate direction changes easier). 

For my part, a 29er with 150/140mm travel is able to get me into and out of plenty of trouble, with good tires climbs technical stuff brilliantly, and with modern geometry I can goo stupid fast. Low speed tech and climbing switch backs is basically compromised (but I personally suck at that anyway), and it requires a lot of commitment for frolicking.

June 25, 2017, 10:53 p.m.
Posts: 26
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: 2017 F1 Thread

That was a really entertaining fracas/debacle. I'm genuinely happy for everybody on the podium.  Seeing the still shot of Valtteri's cat from lap one, the fact that he scored points was insane... having a legitimate shot at the win (if one more safety car happened) is just unreal - dive of the race to me, even though Ricciardo was brilliant, and Lance proved he belongs in that seat with his pass on Massa and the Force India pair.  Wehrlien is still keeping Sauber ahead of McLaren in the constructors points, which may hold through the end of the season. 

Seb thew away a race win, without doubt. I think that in and of itself is significant, and Ferrari management can only forgive and forget at a certain rate - more wins and it becomes a footnote, more problems and whoever replaces Kimi has a better shot at being lead driver sooner. 

Ocon shoving Checo into the wall took Force India out of what could have been a double podium/probable first race win. I hope Verstappen and Red Bull can put together a complete race, because a real Newey car next year in what is now an aero efficiency formula could be his best shot.  I feel bad for Hulkenberg (self-imposed) and Grosjean (less so, but there had to be a way Magnusson is driving around those issues).

June 25, 2017, 10:38 p.m.
Posts: 26
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: Protective Frame Tape?

That all makes sense, it hadn't occurred to me that the reason mine looks only mostly trashed is that I covered it in electrical tape. Considering that it's an out of production diamondback frame, I'll probably never have the occasion to remove it.

I think I'll pony up and go with helicopter tape on my other carbon bike.

June 19, 2017, 11:28 p.m.
Posts: 26
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: Protective Frame Tape?

I can't possibly be the only person who had tried hockey tape on chainstays, over a thin section of inner tube... No idea how awful the tape residue is going to be, but I also see no reason to remove it.

June 19, 2017, 11:21 p.m.
Posts: 26
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: (+) 30mm on the bars - am I going to notice?

You should definitely be able to scoot stuff in and see how it feels. Is trying a 10mm shorter stem a realistic possibility? A lot of the bars feeling much wider is that you also end up a bit further forward with your center of mass, which draws more attention to that change

June 19, 2017, 11:18 p.m.
Posts: 26
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: Strong, Durable Wheels

Not many places have them, but the WTB ST i25s are pretty tough rims, but not exorbitant in term of weight (580g in widest 29er). 

I ride like a fat oaf, but somewhat quickly (usually into rocks, or cacti). That run has lasted the longest for me, the wheel is actually on its second SLX hub rebuild with the same rim. 

They'll still dent, but I was writing off tires due to sidewall immolation at the same time, and they bent back easily. Hadley hubs, Hope, or if you want to look at the hubs as as potential investment, DT350.

June 19, 2017, 11:11 p.m.
Posts: 26
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: Long-stroke Hightower

Posted by: jan

How do you know! TELL ME YOUR SOURCES!!!

I was curious about that as well. I had heard rumors that there would be an early June and an early July announcement, and we have the N4... but I haven't seen anything definitive. 

As for the 160 front, 150 rear setup that comes with the 57mm stroke and going to a longer fork, I think some of the magic is added capability up front. I got to beat on the full Enve/X01 demo build, and it still wasn't that snappy climbing (technical or flat) - just eminently capable. Longer shock isn't going to take that away. 

Since it's already a bit of a bulldozer downhill anyway, I can see the appeal of adding A2C while keeping the bb drop close to stock.  On a larger negative air spring shock, some of the kinematic hyperactivity from punchy pedaling efforts calms down slightly, while achieving a more supple feel on small stuff. The other contributor to why people love their long shock setups is that many went from a Monarch RT3 DBA, a good but not great shock, to a Float X2, Topaz, Ohlins TTX, or Vivid Air.

June 19, 2017, 10:44 p.m.
Posts: 26
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: Whistler waiver withstands test by severely injured mountain biker

Posted by: ReductiMat

If this were a case of an insurance company suing on behalf of the person, would it be general knowledge?

Usually situations that are screwy (or at least really obvious to anybody with common sense) but go through litigation anyway fall under that category... I think part of the reason is that the ramifications of this are mostly positive financially for new bike parks.

June 15, 2017, 11:03 p.m.
Posts: 26
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: Math nerdery, gears.... (The Truth About 11-Speed)

Posted by: sjshaw672

Any guesses on when the first 60T sprocket will arrive? We could all run 34/36/38s then...

I've always had the nagging feeling that the Eagle setup would win out over the e.13 type (9-46T) for the simple and tragic reason that people could e-peen harder about how large a chainring they run.

I've found that unless I'm on a long ride with over 2000ft of climbing, the 30(oval)/42 on my 29er isn't what's holding me back.  Even then, my biggest range limitation is on the top end.  I'm tragically slow on climbs anyway, but I'm spun out on a few high speed descents that in my mind are worth climbing to (30-11), so if I go to a 9-46T setup then I solve both of those issues at once.

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