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36 comments found

Washington State Bans E-Bikes on Trails - March 10, 2018, 1:45 p.m.

Is that referencing me? Because we do not make nor plan to make anything for the ebike market

Washington State Bans E-Bikes on Trails - March 10, 2018, 9:10 a.m.

There is a lot of ignorance in these comments.

I have an ebike and its great. I also have a regular mountain bike. My ebike is just an efatbike but its usefulness is outstanding. I use it for exploring, and will use it for trail building and commuting this summer. As a tool for accessing trail building spots, there is nothing better.

Ebikes go uphill faster. That's it. They do not descend any faster. I'm speaking about pedelec which is the only type of ebike I know.

The notion that ebikes will cause more trail damage is both silly and ironic, considering those are same argument put forth by hikers against us. Its based on ignorance.

I will probably go with a pedelec enduro type bike in the next few years as my primary mountain bike.

The only real issue I have with ebike users is that it allows for people to climb dh trails easier. But, with proper signage, I think that can be largely mitigated. There are also throttle control ebikes that blur the line between dirtbike and mountain bike, and I believe are open to discussion on banning trail access.

An Aerospace Perspective on Carbon - Jan. 30, 2018, 7:36 p.m.

Sweet! I had 3 Xprezos, 4 Balfas, and an Appalache. I don't recall any of them having a soul, but to each their own I guess! Steel does ride nice, but carbon can be engineered to ride exactly the same. I love steel bikes too.

An Aerospace Perspective on Carbon - Jan. 30, 2018, 7:21 p.m.

Joe is an awesome guy, and steel is quite a good material in which to construct a frame out of. Carbon frame building would be, by a huge margin, the most labour intensive material to build anything out of (no robots, all by hand), so its not something you do in your shed. Maybe a little bias here? But either way he's killing it.

An Aerospace Perspective on Carbon - Jan. 30, 2018, 7:15 p.m.

Did you actually just say that steel has soul?

USWE Airborne 9 Hydration Pack - Jan. 18, 2018, 5:48 a.m.

I've been using an USWE pack for a few years now. The strap system is so good it ruins you from looking at other packs. For riders who hate wearing backpacks, this is the brand that might change your mind. I like that they make small packs too!

Quick-Release Axles vs the Rise of Integrated Tools - Jan. 17, 2018, 5:09 p.m.

QR axles. The Donald Trump of bike parts. #controversial

Quick-Release Axles vs the Rise of Integrated Tools - Jan. 17, 2018, 2:31 p.m.

Cooper isn’t old enough to be that grumpy. Seems fishy (formerly REALLY grumpy internetter)

Quick-Release Axles vs the Rise of Integrated Tools - Jan. 17, 2018, 1:53 p.m.

Definitely grumpy, or just nerdy. Hard to tell. I might downvote you again hahaha

Quick-Release Axles vs the Rise of Integrated Tools - Jan. 17, 2018, 1:36 p.m.

You’re grumpy. Go ride your bike or take pictures of your Fritan

Quick-Release Axles vs the Rise of Integrated Tools - Jan. 17, 2018, 12:38 p.m.

With rear ends getting wider, the chances of bashing the outside of your bike becomes more frequent. I hit my rear axle lever a few times last year. Probably user error, but if I can tuck the end of that in an extra 20mm or so then its worth carrying a tool. Plus, bolt on axles aren’t an issue in dirtbiking, so why are we so different? They get flats as much as we do.

Quick-Release Axles vs the Rise of Integrated Tools - Jan. 17, 2018, 6:31 a.m.

I've always supported bolt on axles, mainly because of those pesky levers sticking a mile past your frame. But also, because they save a little weight, and offer a more secure fit (if you actually tension the bolts).

2018 Santa Cruz Hightower LT - Jan. 14, 2018, 7:50 a.m.

I have a DVO Jade with Super Alloy Racing coil on my regular HT. Feels great! This frame has 13% progression, so a coil is a good option. There was virtually no set up time. I bolted it up, turned a couple dials and... done!

Behind Pole's CNC 'Superbike' - The Machine - Jan. 7, 2018, 7:47 p.m.

Right. Like I said, to produce aluminum requires huge energy resources and the result is a very large carbon footprint. That's just based on the equipment used for mining it alone. Not to mention the process of producing it and the chemicals and waste in machining it. How much gets recycled? I would say a very tiny percentage. Yes, the resin used in CF is nasty. Sanding? Waste? Well, if you optimize your manufacturing then you can greatly reduce waste. Sanding is the earmark of shitty manufacturing. Let's face it, if we are partaking in riding high end mountain bikes, then we are all guilty of leaving a footprint. But let's not buy into the notion that aluminum is somehow an environmental saviour. Because its not.

Behind Pole's CNC 'Superbike' - The Machine - Jan. 6, 2018, 8:28 a.m.

Choosing aluminum for environmental reasons? Riiiight.

https://recyclenation.com/2010/11/aluminum-extraction-recycling-environment/

The issue of Chinese carbon production is one you can see first hand, with piles of scrap carbon frames being thrown into a landfill. I get it. However, let's not pretend that aluminum is a safer alternative because a tiny percentage of the end product might get recycled. Just the amount of fuel burned by haul trucks alone is astonishing.

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