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Coming OUT On A Ride - April 24, 2021, 1:42 a.m.

Yes, reading this and the - frankly, heartbreaking - piece about Corey Walsh makes me equal parts angry and sad that this is even still an issue. Why are we still talking about this?
But since it is very obviously still necessary to talk about it, thanks for sharing, Matt.

To Ride or not to Ride During a Global Pandemic? - March 21, 2020, 3:20 a.m.

I must say I find it difficult to follow your posts, which may be due to my lack of command of the English language or may be due to their rambling nature (as perceived by myself).

About the author of the article above: https://mdprevent.blogspot.com/2012/10/can-bill-sardi-be-trusted.html Also, I find his sayings (in other articles as well) contradicting most research I know of (no, I'm no MD and yes, he'd of course claim that's the big conspiracy and I'm just drinking the kool-aid).

According to several MDs of my personal acquaintance (people who have to deal with the situation right now), s*ht is really hitting the fan and it will get worse. The severe cases are here, even if the true death rate may be lower. If the ER is overwhelmed, it doesn't actually matter if the guys there are 10% or 1% of the infected population, the problem is the overwhelmed ER. And this situation is real and happening, not the construct of media/government/deep state/pick you conspiracy.

So, let's stay calm and do whatever we can to prevent any further spreading of this sucker. Afterwards, we can asses what could have be done better and who to blame, but right now, let's act.

Safe riding to you, have to go do the shopping for some elderly neighbours, will ride tomorrow.

To Ride or not to Ride During a Global Pandemic? - March 20, 2020, 12:45 a.m.

The claims made by Dr. Wodarg are judged as false, irresponsible and unscientific by most Docs. Only article I could find quickly is in German, sorry: https://correctiv.org/faktencheck/hintergrund/2020/03/18/coronavirus-warum-die-aussagen-von-wolfgang-wodarg-wenig-mit-wissenschaft-zu-tun-haben

I support your sentiment of taking precautions but not freaking out, though. I'll keep riding, but will take it a little easier (downhill, that is).

AXS Strikes Back! (Does The Future Have Fewer Gears pt II) - Jan. 26, 2020, 2:12 a.m.

Haven't you ever wished you could pedal a slightly higher/lower cadence while maintaining the same speed? Of course, this would be on long fireroad climbs, not on technical singletrack where a steady cadence is impossible. But even on steep, rocky singletrack grunts, just a bit more/less? Obviously, our pedalling preferences/habits differ vastly.

BTW, most of your guesses about me further above above were correct (for some reason, I could not reply to them), though I don't think I know anyone working for Scott. The 3x12-rider typeology (is that even a word?) was hilarious.

AXS Strikes Back! (Does The Future Have Fewer Gears pt II) - Jan. 23, 2020, 11:54 a.m.

36 TALAS yes, but only 160mm, and no remote lock-out. I did, however, once write an email to Marzocchi to ask whether it was possible to put something like an ETA (Marzocchi's travel-adjust system, for those too young to remember) in my Shivers.... only thing more Euro would be asking if you could run Eagle as 3x12. Moreover, I'm still proudly rocking a Pike DPA ;)

AXS Strikes Back! (Does The Future Have Fewer Gears pt II) - Jan. 23, 2020, 9:11 a.m.

Thanks for your reply. Manual shifting would be too frugal for me (yes, I have a remote lockout for the shock on one of my bikes, why do you ask?.....).
Moreover, the setup you suggest here has barely more top end than my Eagle setup (I know you don't need it, but I do, sometimes) and a significantly higher lowest gear. Gearing steps would be nice, though. You see, Im thoroughly European: GIVE US MORE GEARS, GIVE US MORE CABLES, GIVE US MORE REMOTES...   ;) No, but I need (or want) range, small steps and to be able to lock out my shock. And since the shock is tucked away in the frame...

AXS Strikes Back! (Does The Future Have Fewer Gears pt II) - Jan. 22, 2020, 11:56 p.m.

I still prefer the smaller steps of the 2x10 setup on my old trail bike to the larger steps od 1x12 Eagle on my bigger bike. Also, even the range of my 24/38x11-36 setup is limited for my riding (which includes commuting to trails, flat transfers to the next hill and some (too) easy high speed descents. With my 30t front ring (and on a steep climb after a few hours of riding, I'm glad I've got that bailout gear), Eagle seriously lacks top end. I've climbed our local hill (500m ascent) on a DH rig with 44-32 as a lowest gear (that's 44t in front for you youngsters) so it's not that I lack strength, but when the rides are longer and the climbs steeper, low end is where it's at.

I know that's an unpopular opinion here, but I feel that outside of racing or unfamiliar trails with a lot of uphill/downhill changes, 1x is inferior to 2x. Yes, you save weight and you get a tiny bit more ground clearance. . But apart from that? With a proper chainguide, my 2x10 doesn't drop chains more often than my 1x12 Eagle. And yes, that's even when racing enduro.

Are Mountain Bikers Accidental A-Holes? - Jan. 15, 2020, 3:39 a.m.

I don't think it's a generational thing. I observe teens acting considerate and guys in their 40s acting like a-holes and vice versa. Moreover, I stand my ground more firmly in unpleasant interactions with other trail users (because mtbrs are not the only a-holes out there) nowadays than I would have as a teen. Still trying to stay polite and even pleasant, but not letting anybody give me sh-- anymore. Usually, people are surprised when you stop and start a serious discussion about trails/trail access etc. when they just tried to get in a quick slur...

Also, I have to admit that I almost ran into/over hikers twice last year. Saw them to late, these new enduro bikes are faaaaaast...(one instance was my first ride onmy new bike...) no excuse,though, I have to be more careful. Made me realize how solw you actually have to ride if you want to be able to stop at sight distance, especially in dense woods. One lady was very pleasanly surprised, though, when I saw her again later (climbing back up) and apologized profusely. We had a nice chat after that.

Mountain Biking Can't Get Better Than This... - June 25, 2019, 8:54 a.m.

Same thing here, only just turned 40, all this old man talk is a real downer ;)
Great read, as usual, Cam, keep 'em coming.
Sometimes when I ride my 29er-carbon-long-travel long/slack jadajada-superbike down a rail, I ask myself: Do I really enjoy riding more than 26 years ago on my first "real" bike I'd saved all my money for (even had a suspension fork!)? No. Do I still enjoy it as much, does it still make my heart sing/my soul spread it's wings/whatever corny image you chose? Damn straight. Yes, the bike makes me safer, it's more comfortable, way more reliable and may even make me slightly faster. But bliss comes from riding, not from the bike. And yes, I admit I'd have a hard time going back to my first ride (would still buy one if I'd find one in good condition) and a lot of the trails I ride now would be almost impossible on an early-90s sled (unless you're Wade SImmons or Tippie).

Dear Uncle Dave: What happened to "ride don't slide"? - Feb. 26, 2019, 10:54 p.m.

Videos of berms being roosted in Slo-mo? Yawn. Give me something like the "Risk" thing from Sedona a couple of weeks back.

But on a more serious note: Since around here, legal trails are rare and purpose-built bike.trails even rarer, our attitude might not have changed all that much. Still, even here, some people seem to forget that we are guests in the forest, not lords of the manor, and should behave accordingly.

About an hour's drive away, an organizer got denied permission to hold an Enduro race since they hadn't sufficiently repaired the trails after the last one.

2019 Santa Cruz Chameleon Carbon - Jan. 29, 2019, 11:27 p.m.

Thanks for your reply. Even 3800 seems like a lot of money, compared to other brands, and I'm not even talking about conumer-direct. Not quite as outlandish as 5700, though.

When it comes to carbon, us consumers have almost no possibility to check quality. One LBS owner claimed BMC carbon frames were way better made than YTs. Of course he would, since he's selling BMC. But how would I go about veifying that claim? The Interwebz were no help (or my search skills lacking). Has anybody with some kind of idea what he's talking about ever taken apart a TURQ and one of the other Yeti frames to check if TURQ is more than a marketing spiel (not saying it is, but how could you check?)? With alloy frames, we may pay a premium for small, in-house manufacturing (Nicolai) and can check welds to some extent. But carbon? We have to believe whatever manufacturers tell us.

2019 Santa Cruz Chameleon Carbon - Jan. 29, 2019, 1:08 p.m.

Methinks I had a bike that came stock with two different hubs. 2008 RMB Slayer SXC 70. IIRC it was something that wasn' so rare in the times of 20mm axles and before the advent of color-matched wheelsets (do I look like I care about green accents on my rims?), but I may be mistaken.

Have to agree with Alex D on the price, though. My new full-susser (will be posted in the forums once it has arrived) will cost less. Carbon, GX, fork tuned to my weight/riding, Saint, Deity cockpit. Admittedly, crappy (let's say mediocre) wheels and no carbon except for the frame. Still, 5700USD for a GX and Fox Performance-equipped HT? Ouch.

Best Of 2018 - Andrew's List - Dec. 31, 2018, 1:32 p.m.

Thanks, and a Happy New Year to you, too.

Best Of 2018 - Andrew's List - Dec. 28, 2018, 4:38 a.m.

Like your "Best of" a lot, especially since it's a really acessible "best of". Tim's had me thinking "if only I had time/money/balls etc" (a nice read, nevertheless), yours reminded me that bliss can be found in simple things and close to home (*The most contemptible night on a mountain bike is like walking on sunshine. *). And, kudos for those last paragraphs.

Uncle Dave E-Explains Himself - Sept. 19, 2018, 2:15 p.m.

I hate to disappoint you, but unfortunately you're wrong about Switzerland. The Valais and Graubünden cantons have very liberal regulations (they depend on tourism), while in other cantons, regulations are very strict (similar to Baden-Württemberg).

You've forgotten France. While on the surface everything seems ok, I've heard stories of strong opposition to MTBers by hikers and hunters, leading in some instances to trail closures.

The increase of lethal accidents is logical when you look at how many new e-bikes are sold. Most (if not all) of these accidents happen in traffic, not in a "sports" context. Giving more and more people who haven't ridden a bike in years the possibility to zip through heavy traffic at 45km/h (legal limit here) on a bicycle.... what could possibly go wrong.... But that's a whole other issue.

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