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prestonium's posts

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April 3, 2009, 10:36 a.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
building goals for the summer

What am I talking about? Gravel. Blasphemy,I know, but maybe we need to be looking at different techniques to maximize the effectiveness of limited resources.

Yeah I have to say that it can be a very good trail hardening material. Look at the Lost Lake trails up in Whistler. They used gravel in key spots to harden up the surface while still keeping it narrow and fun. The major benefits being that it's super easy to work with and a heck of a lot less work than rocking in a section of trail while still achieving great sustainability!!

March 5, 2009, 10:48 p.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
Neds

poodle paths are not xc. "xc" mean cross country, as in going where there are no roads

So by that definition all mountain bike trails should be considered cross country~

Or I mean how close to a road do you need to be before it's considered XC? 100m, 1000m?

Have you ever considered the idea that maybe Neds has been used in those races because it was the only available option?

March 4, 2009, 10:19 p.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
Neds

hehe, guess I must be~

March 4, 2009, 9:15 p.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
Neds

Wow~ this thread is getting quite derailed. Admittedly I don't know what Neds was like back in the day, and I apologize for making it sound as if it was a DH trail to begin with. However, any attempt to refer to Neds as an XC trail is also quite misguided.

When it comes to ownership of a trail, the permitted builder can be assumed to be working on behalf of the landowner. Therefore, they have the basic right to do what work they see fit on the trail as long as it fits within the scope of such said permit. Feedback from the public should be considered in the course of such work, but the ultimate decision lies with the person doing the actual work.

For example, expecting that a builder will be content to drain puddles and clean the doggie poo off the trail for everyone is naive. They have a vision and a desire to put their ideas into action. That vision does not always match with the the wishes of the entire user group on the trail, but such is life.

March 2, 2009, 2:32 p.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
Neds

Nice to see Neds become a true downhill trail again. Stunts are nice, but it seems like almost all the trails on the Shore have become free-ride predominantly. Stunt this and stunt that. And of course all those stunts require maintenanceā€¦. and who will do that maintenance? Not likely to be those who complain about the work being done in my experience.

March 1, 2009, 1:40 p.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
TR: Seymour UPDATE - March 7/09

Good job man! There were some huge trees down that would have required considerable skill with a saw to clear. Your efforts are greatly appreciated and hopefully there was some cedar included in the fall down!!!!

Cheers

March 1, 2009, 9:34 a.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
TR: Seymour UPDATE - March 7/09

Did you even get the giant tree on Bridle just after the second or third bridge??

Jan. 29, 2009, 12:58 p.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
Who has right of way on a trail?

it all comes down to the demographics of the users. If lots of hikers use the trail, then something has to be done to accommodate them.
Declaring all trails multi-use is not the answer;some trails should be biking only and built so that it's apparent that is their primary function.
But regardless of a trail's purpose when it was built, you have to look at the "real" situation on it. If you just ignore the foot traffic, it will create massive braids and trample the surrounding vegetation a ton. Of course it's a more complicated issue than that, and as bikers we need to protect our interests. However, we also have to ensure that we don't continue to be seen as a radical element of society rather than one of the core components of it that we truly are. Taking an us and them approach to the matter is not likely to be conducive to discourse or progress in any direction.

Jan. 25, 2009, 10:24 p.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
Who has right of way on a trail?

Excellent discussion we have going here. I truly think everyone should ease up on Mr. Bond and realize he is honestly trying to gather constructive feedback and has bikers best interests at heart.

As far as ROW goes, it all comes down to common sense really. Hikers are not retarded and a lot of them are also bikers present or past. They know when it's appropriate to step aside or when to expect bikers to do the same. If we all just relaxed a little bit and realized that hikers and bikers do not represent diametrically opposed groups, but rather people who are both out to enjoy the great outdoors in their own ways, it would improve relations dramatically. Let's embrace hikers and welcome them to use our trails (and welcome them to visit our trail days, too ;))

Personally I have no problem with hikers using a trail that I have built/maintained with the primary purpose being to improve the riding experience. Horses and motocross is a another matter entirely and as previously stated not compatible with the vast majority of trails on the North Shore.

When building a trail it is important to consider the demographic of the users and work accordingly. The staircase that you spend a couple of days building to allow hikers to safely negotiate a steep section can make a great impression on hikers, as well as allow them an easy alternate path to take that will minimize or eliminate the need to worry about ROW.

Jan. 12, 2009, 2:42 p.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
Current Conditions

Bridle could be ridden, but it will be mostly on hardpacked snow. I cleared a lot of deadfall off it today and will try to get rid of the fallen trees on it by next week~

Dec. 12, 2008, 11:47 a.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
Why the IMBA hating

totally, what a lame comment~ maybe in Wales sustainable is no fun, but over here you can make a totally sustainable trail that is still a blast to ride. All you need is a slope, some tools and a vision. The main problem is it's very hard to do on flat terrian (ie. trans canada trail), you need some form of slope to achieve a sustainable trail unless you are going to gravel the heck out of it!

Dec. 11, 2008, 10:52 a.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
Why the IMBA hating

If the trail is built with a proper outslope that incorporates grade reversals, grade breaks, the half rule and armouring in the right places it can essentially be maintenance free. There is such a thing as a virtually maintenance free trail, but the lines that we have to work with here on the shore are so old and worn that it's almost impossible to achieve given what we have to work with.

If however it's built on loam, down the fall line, and with sustained periods of 10% plus grade it won't last. And sometimes that's ok. If it's built in forest that will be clearcut anyways in a few years for example. However, if the trail is located in a high profile area with limited space (ie. the shore) it probably isn't gonna fly.

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