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prestonium's posts

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Nov. 1, 2015, 5:37 p.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
vandalism on Leppard

Lol. You obviously don't know Peter. He loves old school tech, janky log rides and the such. If he took that log ride out it was because it needed to go. I'm sure he misses it and has ridden it far more than most of us.

Peter also loves his rockhammer and I think that was actually a smart way to drain that puddle. But if you would like to ask him about it be prepared for a 45 minute talk about rockhammers, armoring and riding. He won't be upset that you asked; he'll just be stoked to tell you all about it!

Yeah and to echo what others have said. Peter is an amazing person and deserves to be treated with respect for all the things he has done for the community over the years. This post may have been a knee jerk reaction but nonetheless it smacks of poor taste and lack of consideration.

Matt Preston

July 13, 2015, 4:23 p.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
Chainsaw bag recommendation?

Have used the dakine bag and really don't like it. It is really awkward and offers no support. I really think that bag is only appropriate for a small saw and for riding with a saw. The bag is so uncomfortable for my 362xp that I was on the verge of buying a smaller saw for carrying in to trails more than a 15 minute hike. My back and shoulders would just kill after hiking more than 10 minutes with it loaded up.

I them tried putting it in the arcteryx hiking pack and was amazed at how easy the saw carried. I forget the model but it's a 65 litre bag which is able to fit the entire saw inside (20 inch bar). I then stuff my chaps etc beside it to keep it snug and off you go. I've done 2 hour plus hikes with it easily. The extra nice part is the bag can be cinched up to fully enclose the saw which keeps it dry especially if I stash it overnight.

Highly recommend trying a good hiking pack over the dakine bag. However I'd be happy to send the dakine bag to someone who'd like it as I'll never use it again.

And in case you were wondering I build 5 days a week and carry my saw in each time so I'm speaking from experience.

Matt Preston

March 10, 2014, 8:11 p.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
bigger wooden structures?

Ironic you say that…

Lol. +1

Dec. 11, 2012, 6:11 p.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
bench cut cribbing

I will second Synchro's method.

Having used this technique to build on the Grouse Grind and other steep alpine trails I think that the key is to make the deadman part of a box structure that ties everything together.

To further cantilever the structure inwards we have used large boulders placed on top of the deadman to prevent the structure from sloughing off the steep slope. Without something to hold it in place the slope forces are often too great for the crib to stay in place.

Oct. 3, 2011, 10:01 p.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
7th Secret Work Complete

In this case the milled logs were put in to save time/money while keeping the work in character with the trail. There are a few other sections where that type of woodwork was done in the past and we thought it would be appropriate to do something similar.

I personally like ladder bridges more in terms of the ride and aesthetics, but milled logs let you build through straight sections easily and quickly. We used ladder bridges for all the turns and only used milled logs for straight shots so that people hopefully won't get skidding off janky logs in the wet!

Oct. 2, 2011, 11 a.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
7th Secret Work Complete

Totally agree that it needs some armouring… and luckily Peter has already done it ;)

Sept. 30, 2011, 8:48 a.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
Pemberton 2011

The Chain Lakes traverse is intermediate level rolling fun. But once it turns downhill at the Trapper's descent…. well…. it's definitely double black in most spots. Very steep sustained fall line sections, the bench cut in places is super narrow with a super soft shoulder and lots of exposure. Switch backs are tight and techy with little room for error. Big mountain riding for sure, be prepared.

We rode up from the bottom of Owl Creek FSR (not fun!!) and it took us 5 hours to finish the loop back to the car. Definitely recommend setting up a shuttle as the road up is 10k of pretty hard climbing and will sap you for the trail.

Sept. 13, 2011, 9:54 p.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
Fromme Wish List

Some really great ideas are getting generated here, but please remember that we are talking about smallish projects. Climbing trails and a new DH trail are all way beyond the scope of this wish list.

Try to come up with ideas that a 2-3 man crew could bang off in a week or two. Replacing rotten woodwork, cleaning up braided sections of trail, improving drainage, etc…

Aug. 5, 2011, 10:41 p.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
CBC structure removal

Yeah it would really be nice to see people respecting the trail designation. LSCR is very supportive of mountain biking and seeing tracks down the fresh gravel on Mystery Creek trail is really disappointing.

LSCR has put a lot of time and money into fixing up that trail, and if they have to go back in and redo it because bikes just groove it out again they are not gonna be impressed.

Plus it just means more time and money spent on things other than bike trails……..

June 19, 2011, 11:40 p.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
What Small Dog for a Riding Companion?

Yeah, I gotta agree. I'm not saying that you should run your dog at full speed down Ned's or WBP. But most "normal" dogs are more than capable of going for a couple hour rip. Most trail riding has enough slow sections that the dogs get lots of breaks and aren't just running full tilt the whole time.

All I know is that if I asked my dog, "Would you like to come for a rip and maybe get some arthritis in your old age, or go for a nice casual walk around the park?"

well…. he's a rider at heart and I know what he'd say.

June 13, 2011, 4:53 p.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
What Small Dog for a Riding Companion?

King Charles Cavalier Spaniel.

Admittedly, I was a bit unsure when I first started dating my girlfiend and I saw this long haired "cute" little dog, but the first time I took him riding in Squamish I realized he was about the best riding dog I've ever seen.

They were originally bred as up-land hunting dogs to help flush birds out while running in front of King Charles horses, but still be a great companion dog for back home at the castle.

The running pedigree is super obvious as soon as you hit the trails…. cuz he just flies and can do it for hours. I've taken him on Comfortably Numb and the Nimby Fifty course and he's still going strong when I'm just about cooked. Weighs around 20 lbs and if you keep them shaved they don't get too hot in the summer and are ok with a jacket on for snowshoeing in the winter.

I tried to attach a picture showing him riding in Pemberton. They are an expensive little dog, but quite a good choice for riding and chilling at home :)

May 10, 2011, 9:23 p.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
Circuit 8/LSCR - how boggy?

There has been some new work done on the John Thompson side this year. We've had two trail days with Rocky Mountain and got some good work done, but there is still a ton of work to be done before the trail will be wet weather friendly. By the end of the summer you can expect to see the trail become a super fun beginner loop!

That said, the John Thompson side stays fairly dry in the wet and makes a nice loop before dropping down to Fisherman's Trail :)

March 9, 2011, 10:29 a.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
i feel stoopid-er

The log ride everyone is discussing is just after the uphill section past the intersection with Will's Way heading East towards Old Buck. It is off on the side with an on ramp that used to be quite tricky.

Thanks for all the support everyone. I know that 99% of people like the work that has been done on the trail. As I said before, it is a really hard trail to work on simply because of the number of people who use it. Not just bikers either, but hikers and dog walkers use the trail a lot. With that in mind, the new work is going to be focused on providing options for people to pass and to avoid people who are coming in the other direction. This isn't "dumbing down", but rather responding to the needs and interests of people who use the trail.

And like I said before, when a group of riders comes up to the modified log ride, I'm now seeing over 80% of them riding the log, when in the past it would have been less than 20%.

;)

Feb. 24, 2011, 11:27 p.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
i feel stoopid-er

Yeah, I hear ya on the consequence thing… We are going to re-install the easy out to let people get off it while it's still low to the ground. I know what you mean about giving progression options, and the decision to rework the log bridge was debated for a long time before it was done. Some progression features are in the plans for that area to address the issue that you raised, but Bridle Path is one of the most challenging trails to work on because of the wide range of people that use it. Every time you do anything on that trail you are bound to displease at least a few people.

To be honest, I've been quite turned off from working on that trail for a long time just simply because of the unpleasant actions/comments of a few select individuals.

The plan for now would be to make the optional woodwork flow better and faster so that less skilled riders will use it more and then to add in some more interesting options. The guy I'm working with helped build Sprock Kids on the SSC and he is full of all kinds of cool ideas for progression features.

Feb. 24, 2011, 9:49 p.m.
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Joined: Dec. 7, 2008
i feel stoopid-er

Sorry man, that was done to improve the safety of the far end of the log that had all the wobbly rungs.

I know people liked it the way it was, but it really wasn't built to an acceptable standard for the landowner. It is easier now, but then again Bridle Path is an intermediate trail and it would be nice to see more riders able to give the log ride a shot. Now that it's been tweaked at both ends, I have seen far more beginner/intermediate riders having a go at it which to me makes it a successful change :)

I'm always open to hearing how others feel about it however as feedback will only help to make the work better.

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