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mattbc's posts

686 posts found

May 31, 2016, 9:11 a.m.
Posts: 690
Joined: Aug. 14, 2007
12hrs of Cumberland

Thanks

May 29, 2016, 8:59 p.m.
Posts: 690
Joined: Aug. 14, 2007
12hrs of Cumberland

10 of us from the Fraser Valley have signed up for this years race. A coed teams, a dad/son team, 4 person ladies team and 2 guys who used to race but are now old and out of shape. Long and short, we're all just going for the fun and enjoyment of riding bikes, drinking beer, camping and racing on the Island.

Does anyone know the course. Website doesn't say much. Is it similar to the first half of the BCBR stage? Do you go that high? Is it singlespeed or CX friendly? Just trying to figure out what bikes to bring.

Sept. 14, 2014, 10:39 a.m.
Posts: 690
Joined: Aug. 14, 2007
Heavy Equipment

Aug. 29, 2014, 8:28 p.m.
Posts: 690
Joined: Aug. 14, 2007
7 Day Moab Roadtrip this April

Four of us are heading down to Moab this coming Tuesday night. We'll be leaving the following Friday. This will give us 8 glorious riding days. Here's a list of some of the trails I was thinking about checking out.

Captain Ahab/Amasa Back - http://www.juicytrails.com/page/8-Captain-Ahab-Amasa-Back-from-town-Moab-UT
Big Porcupine Rim loop - http://www.juicytrails.com/page/4-UPS-LPS-Porcupine-Rim-from-town-Moab-UT
Whole Enchiladas - http://vimeo.com/32878878
Dead Horse Point loop - http://www.mtbproject.com/trail/5083590/dead-horse-point-tour
Mag 7 - http://www.mtbproject.com/trail/652241/mag-7
Bartlett Wash/Sovereign - http://www.mtbproject.com/trail/157019/bartlett-wash-slickrock and http://www.mtbproject.com/trail/611953/sovereign-cedar-mountain-loop

And maybe a drive to Fruita for the Kokopelli loop - http://www.mtbproject.com/trail/290187

Is there anything else near by with in a 2-3 hour drive from Moab we should check out?

Aug. 13, 2014, 12:53 p.m.
Posts: 690
Joined: Aug. 14, 2007
7 Day Moab Roadtrip this April

I'm heading down to Moab in September for a 10 day road trip. We're towing our travel trailer. Any recommendations on a good camping spot in town?

March 24, 2014, 12:53 p.m.
Posts: 690
Joined: Aug. 14, 2007
Guesses on the new RockShox product?

You seriously think they're only coming on S-Works bikes!? I hate to be the bearer of bad news but they will be available aftermarket and on many OE bikes. Yes, they'll be expensive but that doesn't mean that they won't be used on muddy or rainy days.

No, I don't think that the Big S will have exclusivity on the RS1. I was just using that as an example because of the previous picture showing an SWorks with an RS1. I'm sure it will be spec'ed on other brands and also sold as a pricy aftermarket fork. But I think you will be one of only a handful of ppl that will write this XC fork off because of the oversight of a fender mount. By the sounds of it, you wont be RS1's target market and I don't think it will hurt their sales.

March 23, 2014, 8:40 p.m.
Posts: 690
Joined: Aug. 14, 2007
Guesses on the new RockShox product?

Good point. Maybe more beer is needed to solve this problem of a fender that keeps mud from flying in the eyes of all the XC riders that are going to be buying a purpose built fork that most likely will only be spec'ed on bikes north of $8k. Have you priced an XC Sworks lately? You tend to leave it in the shed and opt for one of your other bikes for those muddy days that you'll need a fender.

March 23, 2014, 8:14 p.m.
Posts: 690
Joined: Aug. 14, 2007
Guesses on the new RockShox product?

Take a look back at my post and come back with a method for attaching a fender that will be effective. There's a reason that the Mucky Nutz Fenders are so popular.

The seemingly impossible can be possible. http://www.bikerumor.com/2014/03/14/spy-shot-prototype-enve-carbon-rigid-29er-mountain-bike-fork/

March 23, 2014, 9:22 a.m.
Posts: 690
Joined: Aug. 14, 2007
Guesses on the new RockShox product?

I for one am pretty excited for this. Aesthetically, that's a good looking fork. Innovation, good or bad, is what advances our sport. Inverted forks have been done before but maybe now technology has caught up to sort out issues from previous incarnations.

March 23, 2014, 9:15 a.m.
Posts: 690
Joined: Aug. 14, 2007
Guesses on the new RockShox product?

Certainly looks pretty cool but…… I guess the market is SoCal XC.

Sound familiar. Isn't this what everyone said 7 years ago about those big and awkward looking 29'er bikes. Good thing that market hype never caught on.

March 16, 2014, 8:05 a.m.
Posts: 690
Joined: Aug. 14, 2007
Steel Cross Bikes with Discs?

http://www.bikerumor.com/2014/03/16/taipei-sneak-peek-ritcheys-35mm-bars-and-stems-swiss-cross-disc-frame-new-wide-tubeless-wheels-more/

March 9, 2014, 9:41 p.m.
Posts: 690
Joined: Aug. 14, 2007
Do Trades Really Carry a Stigma? (I need life advice from the great NBR)

I think any job you do, the more you know, the more you're willing to make yourself available, the more versatile you are, the better you will be paid and will likely weathering a down turn in the economy.

I work for an American Aerospace company and the 08' economic crash hit our company hard. Over a seven month period, our Canadian plant went from 120 employees (Mech-techs, Engineers, Millwrights, Machinist, Fabricators and Welders), down to 26. Upper management survived and a core group of Millwrights and Machinist were left, myself included.

So to answer allix's original question 4 pages about being a Machinist, if you do pursue a machining trade, don't limit yourself to working just one machine or being a CNC operator. They're the first to go. Know CNC but learn manual. Lathe, Milling and Boring mills. Find shops that can offer you that exposure. And be willing to pay your dues working the "shitty jobs" as an apperentice. Cause that experience as a journeyman will better your chances of always being employed no matter what the economy is doing.

My company rebounded and has steadily been rebuilding. We're close to 140 employees now. Recently, over the past 6 months, I've transitioned off of the machine shop floor and into the office. Planning and Scheduling. I can tell you first hand, skilled trades (machinist [HTML_REMOVED] programmers) are in demand and hard to come by. And I earn more as a "trades person" pushing a desk then the Mechanical Technologist and Engineers do in our office.

March 9, 2014, 10:54 a.m.
Posts: 690
Joined: Aug. 14, 2007
Do Trades Really Carry a Stigma? (I need life advice from the great NBR)

My main concern is that because I have no concept of how much $52,000 (median machinist salary) is, I have no clue how well one can live off that.

Thanks
Allix

There is a shortage of Machinist right now. Typical starting wage of a journeyman machinist at most shops is $27/hr - $29/hr for the first three months. At my shop, if you're just an average machinist and only have experience running a smaller vertical cnc machine center, you'll stay at that wage. $56k to $60k is decent. If you're competent on large vertical cnc machines, horizontal or manual, your looking at $30/hr - $35/hr. $62k to $72k. If you have more experience and versatility, your wage will reflect that.

Can you live off this? That depends on your priorities, expectation in life and how comfortable you are with debt. Do you have a $700/month car payment ($34k car loan for 4yrs), $1900/month going out to a mortgage ($456k house), do you have $200/month in cable bills for channels your not even watching, are you putting $6k/yr into RRSP's, are you wanting a $7000 bike every second year, are you taking your family on vacation every year…. the list goes on. (est. $$$ for the purpose of this conversation)

The amount of money you make is relative to your expectations in life. The more you make, the more you'll spend.

March 9, 2014, 10:29 a.m.
Posts: 690
Joined: Aug. 14, 2007
Do Trades Really Carry a Stigma? (I need life advice from the great NBR)

I grew up in a Kootenay mill town. There was 4 saw mills, a pulp mill and a smelter all within a 30mins drive. Mill workers and trades people drove the economy. My dad and 4 uncles were in the trades - 3 Millwrights, 2 Machinists [HTML_REMOVED] 1 Fabricator. I grew up knowing it was important to get a trade, never turn down overtime and enjoy your life outside of work.

Straight out of high school, no education, I was making $52K/yr pulling lumber. Like a typical 18yr old, I pissed away all that money. It took 2yrs for me to realize I needed a trade because the forestry economy was on a down turn. Because of the union and seniority, there was no way I would get an apprenticeship at that mill, with that company. So I quit, got a student loan and took a 1yr pre-apprenticeship program. Best move I ever made. The saw mill I was at has been shut down for over a decade now.

I've been a Machinist now for over 17yrs. I mainly work manual but can program and run CNC and I've never been unemployed. It helps to be as versatile as possible. So try to get on as many machines as you can and take additional part course at BCIT. It can be a struggle to get signed up as a 1st year apprentice, but stick with it. Going the CNC route will help you get a foot in the door with a lot of companies. But my advice would be after you have a good grasp of G-code and set-ups, switch to manual as soon as you can. The majority of the older generation of Manual Machinist are retiring now and there already is a shortage of them in the lower mainland. Because of how BCIT's machining program is structured, the market is flooded with CNC operators.

The Machining industry in the lower mainland is big but not that big. There are lots of little mom [HTML_REMOVED] pop shops, one off jobbing shops and then there's the high volume sweat shops.

We have 38 machinist at the (non union) company I'm at. A third of us make $75k+ a year. What I really love about my shop is that we aren't high volume. A lot of one offs. Batch runs rarely go over 15 parts.

I became a machinist because I love making things with my hands and because I knew you'd always have a dry roof over your head, a lunch room, you knew where you would be working each day and because of the high earning potential.

I know I would have enjoyed and excelled at other trades too. I was working weekend shift a few years ago and during the middle of the week I was helping a buddy who owned a siding company. I really loved doing Hardy siding and reno's. Each day you could look back and see what you made. But you were at the mercy of the weather. Working in the rain sucked.

Millwrights, Electricians, Heavy Duty Mechanics, even welders can make a lot of money. But the earning potential of machining, coupled with a dry roof over head and being home with my family every night is why I choice Machinist.

March 7, 2014, 10:25 a.m.
Posts: 690
Joined: Aug. 14, 2007
Reliable dropper posts

I have a Specialized Black lite on my Epic and have absolutely no problems since installing it last season. I prefer having only 3 ride heights. Race height, moderately going down height and got-to-pay-attention-this-is-steep height. I do a lot of steering and maneuvering the bike with my legs against the saddle, so knowing the exact position of where the saddle is going to be is key to me.

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