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Feb. 26, 2020, 8:29 p.m.
Posts: 260
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002
Re: Do you support or agree with the nationwide Protests?

here's a great history lesson to help explain why we've gotten to this point

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ob8FxjYbksJICPfIB2j0CLxNvrBLGusQ/view?fbclid=IwAR2ksfU4uLGd1lwMV-GMoEgb8ujhKHAqU5S-WkhJSVOv05cAdTsCa_mP_eU

Feb. 26, 2020, 8:18 p.m.
Posts: 260
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002
Re: Do you support or agree with the nationwide Protests?

Posted by: FLATCH

So how do we feel about those “protesters” trying to set a loaded freight train on fire. Seems reasonable.

I do like that some of the usual suspects are getting outed for their habitual protesting. Basically shit disturbing anarchists who protest anything and everything under the sun and seem to be enjoying their time in the spotlight. How do you think FN really feel about their protest being hijacked for others political gain.

Don't make the mistake of ignoring a serious issue simply because some nitwits have jumped on board the protest train.

Feb. 24, 2020, 10:30 p.m.
Posts: 260
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002
Re: Trump.

Posted by: ReductiMat

So do you hate Trump and Bernie the same amount?

sometimes, a funny pic is just a funny pic

Feb. 24, 2020, 8:39 p.m.
Posts: 260
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002
Avalanche awareness

I'm sure many of you who hit the backcountry have already read about this on FB, but in case you haven't Adam's story about the loss of his wife Laura is a strong reminder that we always need to be mindful of the environment we're playing in. 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/laura-kosakoski-avalanche-death-1.5473338?fbclid=IwAR2YQNtwzxPI85__v4uhYOYj53bizhY-K71YI-RAqOJDmfKhVN_h6NpbXmk

The following is from his FB page

After Laura’s eulogy and obituary, this accident report is the hardest thing I have written. I have been putting off writing it for weeks, but it has been eating at me. I did check with our partner on the day, Kevin, before sharing it and had him review it for accuracy. We hope that by sharing this that someone can learn something that may save them from enduring the horror that we, as well as our families and friends, the search and rescue crew, the first responders and the medical staff have endured.

Kevin Hertjaas and I had been trying to coordinate schedules for a few months to ski together. We finally made plans to meet at the Fenlands Recreation Centre in Banff on Friday January 10th at 8:30am to carpool. My wife, Laura Kosakoski joined us too.

Kevin is a well-known and internationally respected ski guide with accreditation with the Association of Canadian Mountain Guides and the Canadian Avalanche Association. Laura and I both have operation level avalanche certification and training and both logged over 80-days of backcountry skiing in each of the past 3-years, with extensive experience before that as well as a lot of summer mountaineering. I am also a member of the Avalanche Canada Foundation Board of Directors. We were all very experienced and well trained. Despite Kevin being a guide, this was not a guided day out, this was a recreational ski day for all of us.

There was new snow that week, but temperatures were forecasted to be cold, around -15 Celsius and the avalanche conditions were considerable in the alpine and at treeline and moderate below treeline. There was a deep persistent layer in the snow that was reacting unpredictably that we all knew about.

We wanted a more casual day of powder skiing, with Kevin needing to get home early, so our options for where to ski were limited. After a good discussion, we agreed to go and check out the Hector South area in Banff National Park along the 93 North. It is an area that has increased in popularity this past year, but one that none of us had been to yet.

After locating the likely access point in the trees from the highway, we pulled over and sorted our gear. We had two inReach Minis with us, as well as a siltarp, a small emergency bivvy bag and full avalanche and cold weather gear. With the equipment sorted, we began climbing the ridge through the trees around 9:30am. We all commented on the surprising ease of access and quick travel up the trees. It was also warmer than anticipated, so we stopped to de-layer.

When we finally reached treeline, we opted to start by climbing a west facing slope. As we climbed above treeline, we noted that there was a solid windslab that had a drum-like feel and opted to transition before committing to bigger terrain above us. The wind had also picked up at this point and we put on warmer clothes.

We noted a small slide path to skiers right of where we were. We identified that there was a risk we would trigger a small wind pocket as we entered it. Kevin went first and, as we suspected, he triggered a small pocket of snow that he was able to ski away from easily. I followed a line more to the right of where he was, trying to avoid thin spots that were a concern. I skied without issue and then Laura joined us. We regrouped in a small cluster of trees and decided to go and look at a south aspect instead.

We climbed up through the trees to the ridge, happy that there was no obvious overhead risk. Once on the ridge, we traversed up to the high point. The wind was starting to pick up and the visibility was limited. We transitioned from there and skied back along the ridge to a bowl/chute a little farther down to skiers left of where we were. Kevin and Laura skied first and enjoyed great snow. I entered farther left of them and also had great powder skiing. We had no signs of any instabilities in the snow on that run. We did observe big wind lips and wind loaded areas on skiers left of the lines.

Since there was a track in already, we decided to do one more lap before heading out. When we ascended back to the ridge, we noted that the wind had really picked up and it was cold. We were happy to call it a day.

We stood at the top of the run, to skiers right of the chute we had just skied and identified a possible creek hazard below us. We also tried to spot a nice access across the creek to exit onto the lower slopes. There was a cluster of trees at the bottom to the right of the path that we said we’d regroup at.

At around 11:30am we gave Laura the honours of skiing first. She skied skiers right of the line and then enjoyed great powder turns down the 400 meter or so line. When she was about two-thirds of the way down, Kevin dropped in a few meters left of her line and started skiing. Wanting to keep my eyes on them, and wanting to watch Kevin ski for pointers, I moved forward onto the ridge crest. I was a further few meters left of Kevin’s entrance and as I moved forward onto a possible entry point, the slope below me gave away. I fell off the slab I was standing on that was starting to move at my feet. I secured myself, yelled avalanche as loud as I could and watched the avalanche pick up speed and move the whole length of the slope. I followed it, trying to see if I could spot Kevin and Laura until I saw a big powder cloud shoot through a small bench at the bottom into the creek. I was shocked at the size of the slide.

As Parks Canada Visitor Safety noted in an accident report posted on December 12, 2020, it was a “slab avalanche 80m wide[…] The crown tapered dramatically along the crest of the ridge from nearly 2m in heavily wind-loaded drifts to as little as 40cm. The avalanche ran approximately 550m. [It] ran on a weak layer of facets and depth hoar near the base of the snowpack. The avalanche caused most of the snow to be removed along its path, exposing the ground and scrubby trees in many places”. They rated it as a size 2.5 avalanche.

Once the powder cloud settled, I moved as far right as I could, to the other side of a small ridge, so that I wouldn’t trigger anything else on top of Kevin and Laura below me. I skied very cautiously down the line. I could see Kevin below me, so I skied towards him. When I was approximately 50 meters above him, he told me that he saw Laura shuffling out of the way of the path into the trees and that prompted him to do the same which saved him from being caught in the slide. He told me to start yelling her name. We both yelled “Laura” approximately 3-times without a response. Kevin then instructed me to put my beacon into search mode and to get out my shovel and probe. Being below me, he initiated the beacon search and was quickly drawn into the gully. The steep angle of the slope and the debris made doing the search complicated. As Kevin yelled out the reading on the beacon, the best reading we got was 3.8 meters. We both knew instinctively that the situation was very serious.

Due to the depth and angle of the slope, we began digging at that reading. We had to clear some snow before we could start probing. After removing over a metre of snow, Kevin probed and I deployed the SOS on my inReach at 11:45am. When he finally got a probe strike, we started moving snow as quickly as we could.

With the angle of the the slope, we had to start tunnelling from almost 10 meters back of where the probe was to avoid more snow falling into the trench that we were digging.

As the time ticked away, I was trying incredibly hard not to panic and Kevin was doing everything he could to give me tasks to keep me focused. It took us almost 45 minutes, or more, to get to Laura. We were pulling out small broken branches, as well as very large and heavy slabs of snow, which slowed our digging.

When we finally got to Laura’s head, there was no obvious sign of trauma, but she was very blue and non-responsive. Kevin checked her airway, but there was no breath, although he told me there was one to keep me on track. Due to the position of her body, we could not perform CPR, so we had to keep digging to remove her from the hole.

Kevin left briefly to correspond with the Parks team via his inReach to state how serious the situation was. I continued to try and dig Laura out. Kevin soon joined me and after a further 45 or so minutes of difficult digging we were finally able to free her. We cut off her pack and hauled her out of our deep tunnel. Due to the steepness and depth, I would sit up slope of her and drag her up my body and across my chest as Kevin hoisted her legs from below. We had to do this about 5-times before she was clear of the entrance.

There were no obvious signs of serious trauma on her head or body, but there was a deep laceration on her thigh likely from a ski. I removed all the warm clothing I had in my pack and the bivvy bag. Kevin started five rounds of CPR without any response. We opted to cease CPR and put her in the bag with all our warm clothes to try and keep her as warm as we could.

We then prepared a possible landing area and waited for the Parks team to arrive by long-line. I was trying not to panic and Kevin kept making up tasks for me to do. When the team finally arrived, around 1:30pm, they packaged Laura out and then flew Kevin and me out by long-line and I collapsed into a screaming crying mess.

We later found out that Laura’s core temperature had dropped to 24 Celsius and that she had no heartbeat. She was flown to Foothills Medical Centre on Calgary where they slowly began trying to warm her core temperature and revive her. We do not know how long she was like that. They were able to revive a faint heartbeat, but she never regained consciousness. After receiving very professional care, she succumbed to internal injuries and was declared dead just after 6:0ppm on January 11th.

Assessment of the day:

We were well trained, well equipped and despite it being our first day out together as a group, we had communicated well about our objectives, what we wanted from the day and our observations. Despite that, we made mistakes that had fatal consequences.

Mistakes we made:

We knew that the forecast was for considerable danger, but we were likely too complacent with that forecast and were not cautious enough. We often ski in that rating, or higher, but we let our guard down. We knew that any avalanche would likely trigger on a deep layer with serious consequence and that the layer was unpredictable.

There were also signs that we should have paid closer attention to. We had earlier reactivity on a different aspect, there was obvious wind loading along the ridge and we underestimated the terrain’s potential. Given the avalanche bulletin for the day and our earlier observations, we should have skied safe zone to safe zone and not skied until the person was clearly in a safe area.

I likely moved forward onto a wind-loaded convex roll that triggered the slide. I should have approached the line further right where there was less loading. I know this, but because I wasn’t getting ready to ski into the line, I didn’t think about it properly.

Based on where Kevin remembers last seeing Laura, it appears as though she was standing on the edge of the safe zone, but was not well placed in it. I speculate that she was taking a photo because we never recovered her phone, so she may have not been as well protected as she could have been to take the pictures. She was either knocked by the wind, debris, or part of the slide and pushed into the gulley below her, which compounded the effects of her burial. It is also possible that the part of the trees that she was by were taken out because of the branches and deadfall we were digging out around her.

Laura was not wearing a helmet that day, which was unusual for her. I do not know if this had any impact on her survival, but given that there were trees around, as well as the density of the blocks around her, it might help in a different situation or scenario. There isn’t a good reason not to wear one.

Performing a beacon search in complex terrain is difficult. Digging and moving that much snow is incredibly hard. Despite having done deep burial practices, being fit and motivated, it took a very long time to move that much snow. The tunnelling required to get to her was much more complex and difficult than I was ready for. It would be even more difficult if there was only one partner skiing. A factor to consider.

This was a worse-case scenario, on top of a worse case scenario. Even if statistically low, the worst can happen. It is a reminder that the mountains don’t care about your level of training, preparation, or how casual your days are. They are dangerous and demand full attention and respect and discretion is always warranted.

Feb. 24, 2020, 1:52 p.m.
Posts: 260
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002
Re: Water line in front yard - need a plumber - NV

it shouldn’t be an issue to reroute the line like XXX_er say but you do need to be aware of where any other services are located. I wouldn’t worry too much about the cracked line, you’ll have to shut off the water at some point anyway. If you do it yourself plan the new line and dig that trench first to leave the old line in place till you’re ready to switch it over.  

I’m working up in Berkley over the next few days, if you’re close I can come by for a look and give you some free advice. I’m too busy to offer any help with actually doing the work tho. 

Get a couple of quotes from say Milani, North Shore Plumbing and Daryl Evans Mechanical (mtb’er I think) as a place to start to see if it’s worth trying to save any money by doing some of it yourself.

Feb. 24, 2020, 12:29 p.m.
Posts: 260
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002
Re: Water line in front yard - need a plumber - NV

Imo your decision will be based on time vs cost. If you have the time to dig up the old pipe yourself which will be the bulk of the work then you may only need a plumber to actually do the connection. You can do it yourself tho as it will just be a compression fitting at the street side and at your pressure regulator inside the house. Finding the line should be easy, as it should basically be a straight line from the shut off to the house. As you already know where the shut off is just dig back from there. You could just replace the broken section of pipe, but it’s probably worth doing the whole thing. It ultimately depends on the condition of the pipe and where/why it broke.

Feb. 24, 2020, 12:23 p.m.
Posts: 260
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002
Re: Water line in front yard - need a plumber - NV

and expensive

Feb. 23, 2020, 9:53 p.m.
Posts: 260
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002
Re: Why did cush core have to be so good?

Posted by: RAHrider

The science says that your firmer tires go slower than my soft ones. This was shown in a study on road bikes that proved that wider softer tires went faster on uneven terrain. This would only be doubly so for mtb. When your tire hits a small bump it has to go up and over or deform a more firm tire whereas a softer one easily goes over everything. Also, I can run softer sidewall tires and have more support. Cc claims a decrease in rolling resistance. I can verify that although my wheels are heavier, the bike rolls nicely and I have some PR's on uphill segments on my 35lb warden running cc. I am curious where the limit of  "softer tires go faster" is though. For instance, what is the ideal pressure in my road tires? 

This all being said, go enjoy your bouncy slow tires. Nothing wrong with that. I put off trying cc because I have never ruined a rim and didn't think the weight was worth it. Now I have them in every bike because I didn't want to ride the ones that didn't have cc.

Yeah, I've heard about the science but have never seen it. Like you say there is a limit of "softer goes faster" and I've "experimented" enough with pressures on the road and mtn bikes to know that there is a sweet spot. I've found that around 85-90 psi is that sweet spot for road. I don't know if I'd say the gains go double for mtb tho, the pressures are in such a low range to begin with that I think there'd be more concern about being too low and causing way more drag or potential rim strikes. I can definitely notice the drag if pressure drops too low, under 70 for the road bike and under 20 for the mtb bike. I find that on a gravel climb like old buck or at sfu those couple extra psi (28) definitely feels faster and it's not bouncy. On a more tech climb a little less, say 24 seems to work well. Mind you I'm over 200 so I probably need a few more psi than the avg rider I see out there these days who seem to be around 120lbs or so.

Feb. 23, 2020, 12:56 p.m.
Posts: 260
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002
Re: Trump.

Posted by: aShogunNamedMarcus

Posted by: aShogunNamedMarcus

Posted by: tashi

Or you misunderstood someone.

Again.

I doubt anyone else thought I was serious but you.

Oh ya, all my fault lol? Leave it to an idiot liberal for shit like this.

I believe that the appropriate term is “libtard” isn’t that (far) right?

Hey in todays world, I dont stop people from identifying how they like. So call yourself whatever you want princess.

Reading comprehension failure is your strong suit.

Ya that had to be why I thought you said eliminate the relgious meant.. well what it did.

And it makes sense. Religious people are more likely to support Trump. You hate that guy so you blindly hate his supporters.

I'm not pointing fingers at anyone in particular here, but a big reason(IMHO) why these threads or discussions often end up in shitshows is due to the quality of the language that gets used. When points aren't addressed directly or vague references and inferences are used in the responses it often becomes downright fucking painful to try and follow what's being said. Maybe when we disagree with something, instead of responding with a veiled insult try and address the issue directly by stating what's wrong and why. If you have some evidence to support your position then that's even better. Sometimes some of these posts make about as much sense as reading a bowl of alphabet soup.

Feb. 23, 2020, 9:16 a.m.
Posts: 260
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002
Re: Rigid Single Speed

thoughts on having a small travel fork up front to make it a little more trail friendly?

Feb. 23, 2020, 9:12 a.m.
Posts: 260
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002
Re: Do you support or agree with the nationwide Protests?

Posted by: Stuminator

Tungsten, I think you just set a record by being the most recent poster on 6 threads.

pfffft, not even close. back in the days of the old board the late night crew sometimes someone would have the whole page of "new posts" lit up with their name.

Feb. 23, 2020, 9:10 a.m.
Posts: 260
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002
Re: Why did cush core have to be so good?

Posted by: FLATCH

Posted by: RAHrider

Posted by: Hepcat

Posted by: syncro

Meh, I'll save myself the cash and just stick with the 40psi I run. Haven't had a flat or rim strike in ages.

No...no, no, no. Wait what? No.

What he said... What was it again? Oh yeah, no

Interestingly my buddy runs his tires 25-30 with cush core because he "likes the precision" with higher pressures.he still finds the benefits out weigh the added weight. 

Spend the $250, you will wonder why you didn't long before.

Spent 130 bucks for valves and just one cush for the back wheel as I’ve never had issues tubeless up front. After a few rides on it now (I was sceptical at first) I think it’s a pretty good investment. As others have put it I’ve found better traction while climbing, and who wouldn’t want that. I like the sidewall support too. No tire rollover in the corners. They can be a challenge to install but with some patience I had it done in about 30 minutes even with a brand new tire.

Ok so not 40psi, probably hover around 24-28 depending on conditions/bike. I can see where the climbing thing makes sense, but I tend to run the slightly higher pressure on more climbing/predaling oriented rides for less drag so the lower pressure with CC seems a bit self defeating. There's a few patches on some climbs though where I have to be careful about losing traction, but that's probably as much to do with choice of rear tire and it being worn than anything else. I will probably eventually give CC a go starting with the medium bike first, but tbh I'm not in a rush. I definitely fall into the camp of not needing all the latest whizz-bang unicorn gear to have a fun ride. I still like taking the old skool 26" hard tail out for a rip now and then simply because it makes a familiar ride a bit more interesting.

Feb. 21, 2020, 8:12 p.m.
Posts: 260
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002
Re: Trump.

this seems like a good place for this. feel the bern?

https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2020/02/18/sanders-embarassing-ineffective-better-than-trump-column/4787722002/?fbclid=IwAR2J_sgYf1jspoIRbYcgN-UW87UImT0-j6GAqYAZNzP60WoVzzS2UCX_inA

Feb. 21, 2020, 2:18 p.m.
Posts: 260
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002
Re: Do you support or agree with the nationwide Protests?

Posted by: JBV

for real ^^ this happened?  man that's ugly.

All part of the revisionist history courtesy movies and tv that Indigenous people did the scalping.

Feb. 21, 2020, 12:36 p.m.
Posts: 260
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002
Re: Do you support or agree with the nationwide Protests?

Well, buckle up and hold on as it seems we’re headed for a shit show. Just listened to Trudeau’s statement and unless the barricades come down voluntarily it looks like government forces of some kind will move in and take them down.

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