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Znarf's posts

827 posts found

Nov. 27, 2021, 12:17 a.m.
Posts: 828
Joined: June 29, 2006
Re: Not what I ordered.

You are beautiful, no matter what they say! Maybe combine it with a bow-tie?

My buddies, wife etc all laughed everytime I swapped a t-shirt and wore a net-shirt.

But on topic. I had a couple similar (with short sleeves though) pieces and they did work for hot days. You feel a bit cooler.

Mine started to smell though after two seasons. ( I did wash them.)

I then swapped to thin cotton t-Shirts for really hot days. They’ll get damp and when you’re moving they cool you a bit. Cheap, easy to wash, don’t develop smell.

For everything else I have a couple of thin Icebreaker merino shirts and they too don’t smell and work terrific for everything under 28 deg for me, after I got used to wearing wool again.

Nov. 21, 2021, 11:44 p.m.
Posts: 828
Joined: June 29, 2006
Re: Bike frame/parts drought 2021

Probably depends on the difference between the smallest and largest cog. 11-46? 11-42?

Nov. 18, 2021, 3:56 a.m.
Posts: 828
Joined: June 29, 2006
Re: Bike frame/parts drought 2021

It's not all that selfless on my end ;-)

My wife bought a Thule bike trailer for our little baby last week. Guess what - my Occam (trail bike, really fun) is one of not many bikes on the market with a through axle which inserts from the drivetrain side. (which I should have noticed while building or wrenching it, before buying the trailer, but I absolutely didn't)

NO way to fix the Thule on there. (My wife LOVES biking, we´ll pedal with the trailer to our local trailhead and take turns there babysitting and riding, so not being able to fit the trailer would kill lots of riding opportunities as a family, no way ;-)

So I am swapping my Carbon Occam frame for a RAAW Jibb frame. It´s a lightly used Jibb from a guy who bought too small a frame for his height, he's selling locally. And I guess I can sell the newish carbon Occam frame for roughly the same amount and just swap parts.

I originally wanted the Jibb, but availability was a problem and I bought the Occam as a barely used (backup) demo bike instead during lockdown and came to like it very much.

What's great about the Jibb and somewhat in line with my earlier post, all bearings, tools etc. from my Madonna will fit. Also the special through axle for the trailer will swap right over.  Same stuff. Frame weight compared to the Occam is almost 2x

But I expect the bearings etc. to last much longer and it'll be much more robust as well.

=)

Hopefully I'll love the Jibb as much as the Madonna in terms of riding fun ...

Nov. 16, 2021, 2:24 p.m.
Posts: 828
Joined: June 29, 2006
Re: Bike frame/parts drought 2021

Maybe off-topic: I find it actually refreshing that the drought (of many things) seems to increase the perceived value of many things we already own. I am more likely to repair stuff, use it until it is in fact worn out and generally feel more and more detached from the long increasing product cycle frequency in the bike biz. 

I „sold“ ten sets of refurbished 40% worn shimano metal brake pads to some guy. And he was STOKED to habe them. He insisted on paying. 

Refurbished means in this context: I swapped loads of brake pads for family and friends who can’t do it before longer trips to the alps etc. and rather than letting them get stranded somewhere on a slope with worn pads and no knowledge to remedy that, I always put in a fresh set to be safe. And can’t bring myself to toss the half worn pads out. 

With no availability and some friends not being able to ride their bikes because of missing pads, I cleaned them (they were not contaminated, just dusty), brushed them with a copper brush, inspected them (they are not very old or something). And wanted to give them away for free. But someone ( a stranger) actually insisted on paying a considerable amount, not peanuts. And was stoked to do it, prized them like a little treasure. 

Same for some really wierd, unused parts and tools that collected dust in my bike compartment for the last 15 years. They sold within minutes. I was prepared to toss them out.

Remember the special tool for first gen Shimano Saint centerlock oversize lock nuts? I sold three to three different people. Nuts!

And for myself, I only am interested in keeping my family’s nice bikes in rideable condition and have some spares in the basement. And people seem to be less hesitant to pay Someone a fair wage to actually repair stuff, instead of simply replacing and tossing out. 

Of course my bikes are tricked out and they fit so much better than the bikes from a couple years ago. That hadn’t kept me from lusting over something new all the time.

Either I am old, my environmentalist consciousness is finally strong enough, bikes are finally matured and ripened or I just prize riding actually that much higher, because it keeps me sane. Or a combination. 

I like it and feel detached from the hype for new stuff. I still follow it, but unless there’s repairability, longevity and real world durability in the mix (lots of riding), aside from other qualities we expect from bike gear, I feel zero wish to replace stuff. I’ll be going into my fourth riding season on my main mountain bike. That’s mind blowing in my track record since I am not a broke teen anymore. (20years gone)

Nov. 6, 2021, 5:47 a.m.
Posts: 828
Joined: June 29, 2006
Re: Need help with a build

Posted by: RAHrider

I got an email tonight. They canceled everything except my $15 fork. They said that the items weren't in stock. Yet the leatt pants I ordered are still on their site for sale. Not sure what is happening at crc, but if they ship my $15 fox 34, I might forgive them;)

Brexit chaos :-)

Sept. 24, 2021, 10:10 p.m.
Posts: 828
Joined: June 29, 2006
Re: Anyone put an HC97 in a late model Lyrik?

One other idea:

Experiment with bar height. When I went to a shorter travel 29er with longish reach and longish chainstays, but steeper head angle compared to my Madonna with a 180mm fork, I had the feeling that my fork dived and the front end felt strange. I fiddled with spacers and even fork travel and compression setup etc. and a firmer fork worked better in this respect, but I find it beneficient to use more of the travel on my shorter travel rig regularly, compared to my Madonna ( I don‘t do stunts which require 180mm on every ride). I do ride stuff which kind of warrants 130/140mm on basically every ride (that‘s in relation to what my body can take long-term, not what a pro could do with my bikes…)

But what actually solved this divey, strange feeling for me, even though I didn‘t expect it at all, was a higher riser bar and a more linear fork setup with enough suppleness.

My stem is set up with plenty (3cm) of spacers underneath (Orbea Occam, size Large, short head tube) and a +35mm riser bar.

When I look at the bike I would absolutely guess that the bars are too high. Especially in comparison to my previous bikes. (But kind of in line with what works on my Madonna)

Actually +1cm of bar rise changed the bike for me from „I kind of regret buying it“ to „I am incredibly excited to ride it and can‘t pick between the Madonna (which I love) and the shorter travel bike“. I tended to run very firm forks and low bars. Which made me never use all the travel, but worked. But it is kind of pointless to lug all that travel around. (But some security margin is nice…)

Sept. 16, 2021, 6:03 a.m.
Posts: 828
Joined: June 29, 2006
Re: Short travel 29'ers

Wow, very detailed and interesting writeups! Thanks!

Aug. 8, 2021, 1:27 a.m.
Posts: 828
Joined: June 29, 2006
Re: Short travel 29'ers

Posted by: Kenny

Pulled the trigger on a size L Jibb with coil. Should be interesting.

Report back after a couple of rides, please! I am very curious for what kind of tires you'll settle on this sort of bike for shore riding!

July 27, 2021, 5:08 a.m.
Posts: 828
Joined: June 29, 2006
Re: New bike time on a budget - need advice

Glad to hear that! And cool that you already took it to all kinds of great riding areas!

July 1, 2021, 9:32 p.m.
Posts: 828
Joined: June 29, 2006
Re: 2021 - Full Suspension Bike Thread

Posted by: Hepcat

Posted by: Znarf

How about a video of my 2021 bike?

RAAW MADONNA V2 Long-Term Review with V2.2 Peek MTB.......

I made this little Video Review to practice my English and camera skills. With travel restrictions I don’t have many opportunities to speak English :-/

I wrote Pete and Cam if it’s okay to post a couple of days ago, but haven’t heard back. So I’ll just try :)

There was some interest for my Madonna in this thread a couple of pages back. So why not…

Haha excellent, that put the rest of our "reviews" to shame.  🍻

And nice manual!

Thanks! Glad you liked it!

June 29, 2021, 1:25 p.m.
Posts: 828
Joined: June 29, 2006
Re: 2021 - Full Suspension Bike Thread

How about a video of my 2021 bike?

RAAW MADONNA V2 Long-Term Review with V2.2 Peek MTB

https://youtu.be/DakbMIy_12M

I made this little Video Review to practice my English and camera skills. With travel restrictions I don’t have many opportunities to speak English :-/

I wrote Pete and Cam if it’s okay to post a couple of days ago, but haven’t heard back. So I’ll just try :)

There was some interest for my Madonna in this thread a couple of pages back. So why not…

June 28, 2021, 9:24 p.m.
Posts: 828
Joined: June 29, 2006
Re: 2021 - Full Suspension Bike Thread

Posted by: xy9ine

yer. lots of tech-gnar jank out there still; just sees relatively little traffic. many sanctioned trails that i *never* see people on. not complaining, of course.

That’s great to hear, I love all those rocks and fallen trees etc.

The forest in BC is so breathtakingly beautiful. An incredible attraction in itself, even without trails :)

June 28, 2021, 12:51 a.m.
Posts: 828
Joined: June 29, 2006
Re: 2021 - Full Suspension Bike Thread

Posted by: RAHrider

Posted by: Znarf

These riders must have dialed bike handling to the extent that stability and not going over the bars isn't a worry for them. And also a lot of it might have to do with being used to performing on too small bikes and not changing a winning combination.

Is the bike "too small" if they are a) winning on it and b) prefer it?

Moir's bike fits exactly as all mine do me. I wonder if the pendulum will swing back a little bit? The strive has geo numbers from 2 or 3 years ago and he is going down a size. I think this says something about how much you lose by going with such long bikes as people are.

Perhaps the take home is that wheelbase does not equal speed for a pro rider. Fast riders can go fast on any wheelbase, but they lose the ability to maneuver the bike when it gets too long?

That's good rhetoric on your part! =)

I love nsmb.com for the great discussions (no sarcasm!)

What I should have said/what I meant - most of the taller top pro riders who ride comparatively "small" bikes seem to have started riding on some "too small" bike of some sort, in the past. When they like their bike OR even win on it, it is a good fit for them, apparently. Athletes can be peculiar imho, because they can compensate insane stuff, when they feel there's a specific advantage etc. They MAKE things work. And that's a great talent and probably what makes them ride WORLDS better than me =)

Still: The bikes which were available before the geometry "revolution" around (2014/2015), were really (too) small for most people 6ft+.

And compared to these bikes even the "smaller" 29" Strive has a relatively modern geo. For illustration: my 2014 Specialized Enduro size LARGE - I am 6ft. Or any video of a DH World Cup pre 2015 and look at Peaty, Minaar, Ratboy etc. https://nsmb.com/photos/view/20341/

I absolutely agree with you, that there is a TOO big. And sizing is a fine line, highly dependent on anatomy, fitness and preference! The POLE EWS rider, even though he is fast, looks like an acrobat of some sort, maneuvering a longboard through the twisty tracks. I think that's not because of his riding style - he's super competent. But because his bike is HUGE.

I do think (but that might be cognitive bias) that most tallish "new-school" top pro-riders don't size down as much. But riding the smallest bike you can comfortably get away with probably still has it's benefits.

How tall are you and what are you riding?

June 27, 2021, 5:54 a.m.
Posts: 828
Joined: June 29, 2006
Re: 2021 - Full Suspension Bike Thread

Yeah, I think so! At least for people of average height. 

Posted by: velocipedestrian

Posted by: RAHrider

Speaking of new FS bikes. What's the deal with many of the EWS riders riding one size smaller? The winner of the latest EWS is 190cm and rides a size large with a 460mm reach. He says that on the gnarly courses, the smaller bike is better. Aren't we all riding "the gnarly trails" all the time here?

https://www.pinkbike.com/news/video-a-closer-look-at-jack-moirs-canyon-strive-race-bike.html

Those Germans at Enduro covered this by testing a bunch of racers bikes vs recommended sizes of the same frames. 

Seemed to come down to the longer bike being more stable + forgiving, vs shorter being easier to move around. So far so obvious, but for us mortals on tough terrain longer is better. For pros with the skills and fitness, mobility can mean better line choice and seconds saved etc... Are we hitting peak reach?

June 27, 2021, 5:52 a.m.
Posts: 828
Joined: June 29, 2006
Re: 2021 - Full Suspension Bike Thread

Posted by: RAHrider

Speaking of new FS bikes. What's the deal with many of the EWS riders riding one size smaller? The winner of the latest EWS is 190cm and rides a size large with a 460mm reach. He says that on the gnarly courses, the smaller bike is better. Aren't we all riding "the gnarly trails" all the time here?

https://www.pinkbike.com/news/video-a-closer-look-at-jack-moirs-canyon-strive-race-bike.html

In my experience (as a European rider, who got to spent three extended vacations in BC) the shore trails (most of the stuff I rode on Cypress, Fromme and Seymour, in Squamish and Whistler) is janky and gnarly, the rock stuff very much so, some of it is very steep and well above what I want or can comfortably ride (or risk). But to some extent most of these trails are "made" with some sort of two-wheeled vehicle in mind, going up or down. So, almost no matter how harsh and janky they get, the have some sort of flow for really good riders. Also the trails don't suffer from hundreds of years of erosion.

Over here in Europe more than half (personal estimation from the two handfuls of EWS circuits I've ridden recreationally across Europe, NOT RACING) the EWS tracks are either mostly based on farming, walking, donkey transport, smuggling (hiking) trails or paths, which are in many sections hundreds, sometimes thousands of years old. They can be incredibly rocky and janky, downright scary. Especially in the France there are sometimes nightmarish sections, made almost unridable in wet or not ideal conditions. (look at the crashes from the Olargues EWS races, even for top ten riders it was only a 70/30 hit rate) Or you have longer parts of stages which are just racing tape, sticks and an undefined grassy slope of a mountain or slalom on gravel roads for hundreds of meters. Sometimes the tracks are just reclaimed, long unused trails. We get more and more purpose built trails and that is great.

The "classic" European "trails" are often not as much fun to ride and require very different riding style and technique, some are scenic however. But if you see the EWS pros flick their bikes with incredible speed and finesse through switchbacks, sometimes hopping, muscling or jack-rabbit-jumping in (to me) unimaginable ways, the smaller frames might make sense for losing as little time as possible. Often they ride EITHER on the front OR the rear wheel in these sections or jump from line to line...

These riders must have dialed bike handling to the extent that stability and not going over the bars isn't a worry for them. And also a lot of it might have to do with being used to performing on too small bikes and not changing a winning combination.

I absolutely DON`T want to say that the BC trails are easier. I want to express that they are more fun and offer more flow, because they are actual biking trails and therefore there aren't as many situations where a longer bike (and not in a racing situation) would cost seconds. Even if it is much more fun, safe and more enjoyable to ride for moderate to great riders, when they are not racing.

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