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DrewM's posts

1858 posts found

Feb. 22, 2017, 7:58 a.m.
Posts: 1,885
Joined: Oct. 16, 2005
Saint/Zee vs. Magura MT7/MT5 : mini review

What about the modulation? I find the gradual increase in power to be a substantial benefit to the Magura brakes.

My favourite thing about their on-trail performance for sure. Progressive power with tonnes on tap when needed.

In my experimenting performance with Servowave levers was very poor. No modulation and a weird power curve likely due to the pads sitting static much closer to the rotor with the Magura calipers compared to Shimano. Raw power is fine but definitely not an improvement over either system as a system.

Running the Magura calipers with non-Servowave Shimano levers performance is very good. No point in doing it with the MT-5 since those blades have a huge range of adjustment (unless if you're wrecking levers all the time - not something I've seen/heard of) but I played around with options because the 7's weren't the best with my small hands. Ended up modifying some stock 7 blades and preferred those.

Now I have HC blades and they're awesome for smaller hands. I prefer the feel of the Magura levers (modified or HC) for a few reasons but that's personal preference.

Feb. 21, 2017, 6:41 p.m.
Posts: 1,885
Joined: Oct. 16, 2005
The Big Stupid (Fromme)

It's one of the two (?) lines on this rock face. I can never remember if Big Stupid or Semi Retarded is on the right.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2gGdToEmpA

Feb. 20, 2017, 11:51 a.m.
Posts: 1,885
Joined: Oct. 16, 2005
What do you carry to remove tight tubeless and procore Presta valve locknuts?

Also works okay as a makeshift pair of tweezers, but not the best for that.

Re. Tweezers I started riding with a set of hooked tick removers that double as decent splinter removers in a pinch. F***ing disgusting little disease carrying parasites.

Feb. 20, 2017, 11:10 a.m.
Posts: 1,885
Joined: Oct. 16, 2005
What do you carry to remove tight tubeless and procore Presta valve locknuts?

I use the Stan's Tight Valve Lockring Removal Wrench. :lol:

That's a handy little piece of kit for anyone who doesn't have the space/desire to carry a Leatherman.

Space in even the smallest fanny pack…

Feb. 20, 2017, 8:46 a.m.
Posts: 1,885
Joined: Oct. 16, 2005
What do you carry to remove tight tubeless and procore Presta valve locknuts?

Fresh sealant works to heal surprisingly large leaks. Even one time when I had a knob tear out of the centre casing.

It's like anything else on a bike that requires upkeep. When a flat occurs in my ride group the sealant is usually dried out (and sometimes waterlogged).

Feb. 20, 2017, 1:22 a.m.
Posts: 1,885
Joined: Oct. 16, 2005
What do you carry to remove tight tubeless and procore Presta valve locknuts?

I carry a Leatherman too. Just an old clunky one but there are lots of lighter versions now. I've used it for tubeless valves, valve cores, bending rotors straight, clipping zip ties… always handy on the trail.

I had a similar situation (although just a valve stem vs. ProCore replacement cost wise) in my minimalist no-pack days. Can't beat a free rock from the side of the trail. One quick wham and it's easy to remove the broken valve. Better than walking home because my calve stem was stuck.

Feb. 14, 2017, 8:25 a.m.
Posts: 1,885
Joined: Oct. 16, 2005
Saint/Zee vs. Magura MT7/MT5 : mini review

I actually bumped into Murray yesterday on the trail and he is still loving his MT5 setup. Warranty was quick and easy for the leak and flawless since then.

My MT5 brakes have done duty on a bunch of different bikes from my Honzo to a Nomad and a few applications in between. They're still awesome after a few sets of pads and multiple bleeds.

The MT5 has a huge range of lever blade adjustment so whether you have tiny or titan hands they work fine.

With the MT7 or MT Trail brakes if you always wear a large glove the stock blades are good. I'm a M/L depending on the brand and I run
The blades as close in as they come.

The HC lever blades have an awesome shape and hook and I'm nowhere near running them to the bar, so I'd highly recommend them if you have small hands and prefer to run the higher end MT7 or MT Trail.

After testing the MT Trail I'd love to see a more budget trail system based off the MT5. The 4-piston front / 2-piston rear is a great mix of power and simplicity. I do think the MT5 offers one of (the?) the best braking values on the market in terms of power, price, quality, and ease of service.

Feb. 11, 2017, 7:19 p.m.
Posts: 1,885
Joined: Oct. 16, 2005
Highway 1 / Lower Lynn Improvements - Public Info Sessions

Google is your friend:

Well… you know what they say. If you have to explain the joke it wasn't funny…

If a guy does it to another guy is it still Mansplaining?

Feb. 11, 2017, 12:06 p.m.
Posts: 1,885
Joined: Oct. 16, 2005
Highway 1 / Lower Lynn Improvements - Public Info Sessions

would only be good for one month out of the year.thats about all the leg is in session these days.

Isn't that the issue with all renewables? How do you store the energy you don't immediately need for future use // how do you power sh*t in down times?

Feb. 10, 2017, 1:47 p.m.
Posts: 1,885
Joined: Oct. 16, 2005
Highway 1 / Lower Lynn Improvements - Public Info Sessions

There is already a Third Crossing. The train bridge crosses the Inlet about 200m East of the Ironworker's Bridge. The track runs within 100 m from Esmond Skytrain Station. "Coast Mountain Express" Squamish to Seabus in 30 minutes, or Squamish to Skytrain in 45. Oh yeah … the train has room for bikes, gear and other junk.

I can see that being beneficial to Squamish in a similar vein to how the West Coast Express transports professionals from the 'burbs to Vancouver and home each day but it would not be a substitute to daily driver/transit traffic back and forth across the inlet.

Never mind track rights (a huge issue with West Coast Express that prevents expansion of the service) that bridge is also going to have to open a lot more once Kinder Morgan's pipeline "twinning" project is complete and ocean traffic has right of way.

Anyways, what I obviously meant was a forth crossing not including Seabus (which rapid transit would replace), red canoes, amphibious cars, etc should bring rapid transit to the Shore.

The time savings alone would get people out of their vehicles especially if centres like Parkgate, Edgemont, etc were connected to the mainline by rapid buses.

Feb. 10, 2017, 7:13 a.m.
Posts: 1,885
Joined: Oct. 16, 2005
Highway 1 / Lower Lynn Improvements - Public Info Sessions

They should build a 3rd Crossing under the inlet from Lonsdale to Granville Street and put all that infrastucture spending to good use as a parking lot. No need for tolls. Just pay for parking while idling in a tunnel and on downtown streets.

How about a third crossing from Lonsdale to Granville but it's actually an extension of Canada Line that services the North Shore. Straight up Lonsdale to Lynn Valley. Replaces Sea Bus and is the focal point for most bus traffic on the Shore so provides further relief with less buses and cars on the other bridges.

Jan. 2, 2017, 3:45 p.m.
Posts: 1,885
Joined: Oct. 16, 2005
NSMB - 2017 - Hardtail Thread

Still loving my fatty. Switched to Hugo rims so I could run tubeless reliably, and keep thinking I'll get around to putting some 27.5+ wheels on there but it's so much fun as is that I haven't got round to it.

What sized tires do you run?

Would you consider running 27.5+ (27x3?) or even 29" (29x2.5) out back with the fatty up front for faster pedalling and way less noise in the summer but still a fun factor?

I've been riding 29+ (29x3") up front with 27 (27x2.5) rear and find the mixed wheel sizes works awesome.

My non-snow fat bike experiences have been loud/slow but I can imagine the potential fun factor with faster rolling/quieter rear.

Jan. 2, 2017, 11:10 a.m.
Posts: 1,885
Joined: Oct. 16, 2005
Photo Gear Question / Remote

Uncle Dave has a pretty sweet setup and takes some pretty damn awesome selfies for articles.

http://nsmb.com/ask-uncle-dave/

I don't think it was cheap but it would be worth sending him a message if you're interested as I know he's experimented with multiple setups (so at least he can tell you what not to do).

Dec. 31, 2016, 11:39 a.m.
Posts: 1,885
Joined: Oct. 16, 2005
Seymour 2016 Conditions (merged)

For this morning:

BP is mainly pedalable from Old Buck. Academy climb clear. Pussyfoot and Penny Lane were a mix of walking/riding and GSM was a relatively pleasant push.

Powerline was easily manageable. Again combo of ride/walk.

Severed was 100% rideable (and a lot of fun). It's slippery hardpack snow but staying light on the bike and brakes it was totally controlled.

Only scary moment was going in high/wide on the largest of the three rolls as it ended up being iced over (acceleration!). Staying low/tight was no issue.

Highly recommended if you need to turn some wheels and have the proper mindset to make it fun.

Dec. 24, 2016, 8:37 a.m.
Posts: 1,885
Joined: Oct. 16, 2005
time for a new pack

Uswe. Not even close. Once you try one you'll be wondering why you didn't do it sooner. Their strap system is light years ahead of whatever else is available on the market. It doesn't move and you eventually forget that you have a pack on. No joke.

http://www.uswe-sports.com/products/hydration-packs/bike

Have to agree that the "No More Dancing Monkey" harness system is very well thought out. I haven't ridden the packs off-road but when I tried them on at Interbike I was genuinely impressed.

I have a Mission/Acre pack (gift from my awesome wife a couple-or-few years back) and it's been awesome. As waterproof as they come, super durable, intelligent use of space and I like the roll top (or fold top) main compartment. It's very adjustable with multiple strap mounting points. Made in the US so not cheap.

I've owned/tried a lot of packs and I'm really happy with it. I recommend it to anyone.

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