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Wayne-P's posts

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Nov. 22, 2004, 11:05 p.m.
Posts: 11,203
Joined: Nov. 18, 2004
Tubeless Question.

The last time I flatted was about 3 years ago. It was on a tubeless set up: Comp 24 2.5" in the back with about 40psi at about 50km's/hr on the old Whistler DH course. 2 holes right through either side of the tire. Needless to say the rock was sharp. But with tubes I would flat about 6-7 times a year.

Nov. 22, 2004, 8:06 a.m.
Posts: 11,203
Joined: Nov. 18, 2004
Tubeless Question.

Originally posted by thewwkayaker
**Michelins Comp16 2.5 (only 1 tire right now as a test).

So if a thinner sidewall conforms better to the terrain but I then need to increase the psi so it doesn't unbead (and thus conform as well to the terrain) haven't I lost all benefit here? **

There's less benefit loss with a thicker sidewall. The greatest benefits of tubeless tires are less rolling weight and less flats, in my opinion. I think overall grip is more dependant upon rubber compound and knobs. You're using the best wet weather tire there is, I can't see why you'd have a problem with grip (unless you're on green wood).

Nov. 21, 2004, 10:54 p.m.
Posts: 11,203
Joined: Nov. 18, 2004
Tubeless Question.

Originally posted by thewwkayaker
OK - explain to me WHY tubeless tires grip better. I cannot see the physics at all, certainly not to any real extent that I'll start running say 28psi and have the same grip as a tire running 20psi. Besides, the whole point is (so I read everywhere) that you can run low pressures. I agree that with higher pressures I won't blow the seal - but I cannot see running higher pressures giving me as much grip as low pressure.

28 to 20psi is a lot. Probably about 24-25psi would be more realistic.

I think what you're thinking about is why XC racers/riders use tubeless: to make skittish tires grip better in slippery terrain, and to help prevent pinch flats (not to mention less rolling resistance). They generally use less air pressure.

But for DH/FR, you've already got a grippy capable tire that can withstand alot, but a tube inside generally doesn't. You're hiiting rocks so much faster and harder that in theory you should run more pressure. And that's what DH racers/riders usually do: use more pressure.

I don't think they grip any better other than within a couple of PSI or so. I've never had a problem with loss of grip. The only real differences I saw was the lack of rolling resistance and less flats.

However, I'm sure due to the fact that you have less rubber inside would mean that your tire would conform to more uneven terrain. Think of a thin kevlar bead tire vs. a DH tire - which one will "give"? The one with less rubber on the sidewall.

But… I'm saying that you have to learn to use more pressure so as to not roll your tire. You have to compensate for the lack of rubber. A tubeless tire is weaker than one with a tube. Compare each at the same pressure and you'll see a huge difference.

All that said, I've gotten away with about 20psi once or twice.;)

What tires are you using?

Nov. 21, 2004, 8:23 p.m.
Posts: 11,203
Joined: Nov. 18, 2004
Tubeless Question.

I've been using Stan's or UST rims for 3 years now and I can say I'll never use tubes again.

When you mount your tire and inflate it, press in on the bead all the way around the tire. The small burps usually don't occur out on the trail after you do this.

Don't run to low pressure. You have to learn how to use more with tubeless. That's part of the appeal with tubeless: run more air [HTML_REMOVED] get the same grip. I used to be the 15-20psi guy but found I was burping out too much air and going flat. Now I consistantly ride high 20's-35 without any issues whatsoever. However, the thicker the sidewall, the less air you can use.

Grip is also a non-issue. Plus, you'll want more air pressure to keep your tires' sidewalls stiffer. Tubeless with low pressure equals a foldable tire.

The ghetto system seems to work for some, but I've found that with Stan's, I can set it up and ride for almost a season without any problems. The only time I switch my tire is because it's simply worn out. Might be worth the expense for some of the ghetto users to get the Stan's kit.

Nov. 21, 2004, 8:03 p.m.
Posts: 11,203
Joined: Nov. 18, 2004
Warning - roadie pics

Wow Goldstone, I'm getting a mental image of you in spandies and it ain't pretty.

Nov. 20, 2004, 7:53 p.m.
Posts: 11,203
Joined: Nov. 18, 2004
2005 sc v10

We've got the '05 V10 at Steed in Ano black. Pretty tight bike. Looks refined over the old one, and smaller than I thought. Noticably lighter too.

Nov. 19, 2004, 11:08 p.m.
Posts: 11,203
Joined: Nov. 18, 2004
Post your Kitchen Pictures

I can't believe I'm getting excited about kitchens pictures.

Nice work Wheeler.

I bought the Thomasville cabinets from Home Depot and put in a kitchen this summer. We had an original kitchen from the '50's, complete with 4 layers of lino. I also put down cork floor which I am very pleased with (it's so comfy).

The best part of the reno was sawing a hole in the side of my old stucco house to make way for the microwave hood fan vent.

Nov. 18, 2004, 9:54 p.m.
Posts: 11,203
Joined: Nov. 18, 2004
My Beef with The North Shore Ripper

All I can say is that the Ripper series was awesome. A race series in my own backyard. I have been waiting for this forever. Cam and James did a great job, especially considering it was the first season. Anyone on any bike can do well in these races. What other types of racing can you say that? I just hope more people turn out next year.

Coming from DH racing - where you're always looking for the shortest, fastest line - to a race where the slowest line was the fastest, it was fun. A totally different way of thinking about your lines.

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