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Timmigrant's posts

2429 posts found

June 19, 2013, 11:17 p.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
Prepare for the 650b Wheel-Size Revolution

You didn't even get my mailing address. Maybe my esarc meter is broken:(

I would have no idea on wheel size, you and your team seem to be the pros at that. Whether it is done with replaceable dropouts or by picking a wheel size is SCBs call.

Mini-DH bike that I can pedal up to anything with. Turner RFX-DW prototype comes to mind (man I wanted that bike!)

Base the frame around a RC4/CCDB/CCDBA.
Bump up the rear wheel travel slightly
Shock stroke and e2e length is probably okay, but if it has to increase no worries
66-66.5 HTA based off a 170mm Lyrik or 55 fork.
STA 73
with the ability to run a full leg extension seat post. Dropper or solid, stealth routing
Lower stand over, slightly longer front centre, drop the bb slightly
I haven't run a front derailleur in 2+years, so single ring specific works good
Base sizing charts around a 50mm stem
1.5" headtube let the rider choice what they want to run/use.
73mm threaded BB/142 rearend
Post mount rear brake mounts

Keep in mind, just because you create a bike doesn't mean someone in Florida should buy it to ride there, much like a Highball with a 40t single ring and 110mm horseback stem is a poor choice for here.

Only one problem, do you call it a Nomad or a Bronson LT?

Your bike already exists, the 2013 Norco Range. I've been running mine with a 170 mm coil Vengeance and it is sublime. More capable descending than either of my old Nomads and substantially more efficient climbing as well. I'd love to have a go on a Bronson for comparison.

June 9, 2013, 12:38 a.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
Suspension Therapy

Hello to all,

It's been a long time. As a few of you had mentioned, crashed in practice at the first Oregon Enduro late May 2012. Suffered a concussion and whiplash.
(The interesting thing is, this later mishap was due to an earlier dismount in March, where I tagged the back of my helmet on a stump. On crash scale of 1-10, this first one barely made it to 0.5. The impact was just "right" however to affect the structure of my cervical spine and as a result my balance. At the time, this was only apparent when I greatly elevated my heart rate (racing). I pieced this together in retrospect, almost a year later.) In late May and thereafter, most of the attention was directed towards my brain and the concussion. Rest was the only option for recovery. I slept 18+ hours a day for the first seven weeks. The more I rested the worse symptoms became.

It turns out I was misguided through nine months of my "treatment" as the multiple specialists I had seen saw my brain as being the culprit. It turns out my neck was the cause of my symptoms for the past ten months (as I figured out on my own). My concussion likely healed within the month or two after my crash, as I have no history of concussions. It's been an extremely challenging path to recovery as I spent ten months in a dark room, with only a few minutes of interaction with others, no books, screens and very limited audiobook time, mind numbing head aches, failing vision, very high light and sound sensitivity, facial numbness and burning sensations, strong left body side pain, locking jaw, developed complete sleep deprivation and very high levels of anxiety. At first I was living in someone else's body, and with time, in someone else's mind as well.

More recent months have been much brighter: have been going through rehabilitation for my neck (and soul) over the past three months. Improvements have been measured in leaps and bounds. Back to my normal weight (had lost 15 lbs), stronger than ever in the gym, and back on a cycling program. I've ventured on the mountain bike, but my treatments involve changing the muscular and bone structure of my cervical spine, greatly affecting my balance. Until my body has adapted, and regained its abilities, I will spend most my cycling time between the trainer and the road bike. Will be back on trails this summer: what is a few weeks after having waited this long.

Suspension Therapy will be back up and running starting Monday, June 10.

For next week, the booking system will be available to the wait-list only. I want to make sure that those who have been waiting for months have an early bird opportunity to pick their time-slots at their convenience. I hope everyone understands. Suspension Therapy will be sharing space with Marx Conditioning: 1439 Hunter St, North Vancouver. Conveniently located next door to Suspension Werx.

Warm thank you's to those who have expressed your support and concern over the past months. Knowing that a community was behind me helped more than one can imagine when things were grim. I am greatly looking forward to getting everyone set-up as quickly as possible; ready for the next race, event, bike park lap, or ride.

If you have any questions, email is always a great way to get a hold of me: arthur@suspension-therapy.com

See you on the trails soon,

Arthur

I had no idea you got hurt, and bummed to hear you've had such a difficult recovery. I couldn't think of a less deserving person to go through such a crappy situation. However stoked to here you getting better and can't wait to see you out on the trails with that infectious smile.

June 8, 2013, 10:46 a.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
Juicy 7 vs Elixir 5

Maybe I'm the odd ball, but I substantially preferred my Juicy 7s to any of my Elixirs. I thought the power was more consistent and I find the Elixirs required more frequent bleeding.

June 6, 2013, 4:43 p.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
any owners of the new killer b Norcos?

I'm not running a water bottle cage, never enough water for me, so I always ride with a pack. Also water bottles fall out of my road bike, I can't imagine they'd stay in when descending on a bike like the Range!

June 5, 2013, 11:08 p.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
any owners of the new killer b Norcos?

I may be biased, but I've ridden a bunch of trail bikes, and I own my personal favourite of the bunch. The Killer B Range is definitely a more capable bike than my old 26 inch Ranges and Nomads in that it is faster when pedalling and more competent descending. To make my Range even more comfy on the descents I'm running a coil 170 mm Vengeance.

The sizing does seem a touch larger than previous Ranges. My large 26" Range was a touch small, my large 650b Range is perfect. I'm 6' tall and like longer bikes.

I've heard folks talking about the bob, and don't know what they're going on about. It's an aggressive 160 mm trail bike. If you mash on the pedals the suspension is going to move up and down. Because the axle path is rearward you will get some chain growth. However that chain growth results in fantastic climbing abilities over rough terrain and the axle path gobbles bumps when descending. If you're in the habit of looking at the shock / rocker when pedaling you'll notice a small amount of movement. That said the bottom line is I'm substantially faster on every trail I ride and I'm having more fun doing it. WIN.

April 26, 2013, 1:05 p.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
Prepare for the 650b Wheel-Size Revolution

http://www.nsmb.com/5214-hey-coach-ep-1/

I think if you corner with lots of angulation as described in the cornering video you'll start to see the big difference between a tire like the HD and DHF.

Can't say I noticed and specific differences in straight line braking. I've only used the HD and DHF as front tires both in 26.

People do seem to comment that the HD is a better 29'er tier than 26, my guess is because it's one of the few high volume 29'er tires so it's actually size not tread pattern making it an okay 29'er tire.

I have a pair of 2.35 Nobby Nic 27.5 tires on the way for my future 27.5 project. Once HRII's become more available I'll likely grab a set of those also.

Totally agree, I find both the DHF and Hans Dampf require lots of lean angle to get maximum cornering bite.

I was fairly unimpressed with the 27.5 x 2.35" Nobby Nic as well. Again really tall supple side knobs. I put substantial wear on a set in 2 days in Sun Valley last summer. Surprisingly I preferred the 29 x 2.25" Nobby Nic, which I am hoping has similar knob sizing to the 27.5 x 2.25".

April 26, 2013, 9:12 a.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
Prepare for the 650b Wheel-Size Revolution

^^Hi airwreck, I was thinking of trying some Hans Dampfs this summer, what did you think of their performance? I normally ride Maxxis tires (Minion DHF specifically) and would like to try something new. Thanks!

Evil what type of riding do you do, and what is the ground / trail surface like? I'm personally a little underwhelmed by the Hans Dampf tire (I've only tried the 2.35" width version). My main complaint is the side knobs, which are very supple / unsupported, and roll over easily when cornering on anything but the softest of surfaces. The result is the tire feels very vague on the side knobs, and the side knobs wear very quickly. My center knobs are almost perfect, but the side knobs are so ruined the tire is almost unusable. Even thinking about braking when the side knobs are engaged results in a complete loss of traction. If your trails are fairly soft the Hans Dampf would be a great option (since the skinny side knobs penetrate the soil disallowing them from rolling over).

Unfortunately the Hans Dampfs and the Nevegals were about the only aggressive tire options for 650b until the High Roller 2, which still has limited availability. If you're looking for an aggressive 650b tire and can wait, I'd hold out for a set of the High Roller 2s. The biggest downside with the High Rollers 2s is that they are an aggressive chunky tire that do roll slower than either the Hans Dampf or the Nevegal, but unrivalled in terms of shear grip.

April 24, 2013, 2:17 p.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
BBC Article on Strava

You must live in a special area where only considerate people are allowed to ride. I have seen the tools ripping past hiking groups with children, and others who have admitted doing similarly idiotic things for KOM glory.

I don't give a shit how good of a pinner anyone thinks they are, unless they are riding in Whistler bike park, they have no business ripping down multi-use trails without shedding speed around poor visibility corners for sake of hikers that may or may not be there. Just check the top finishes on any typical Burnaby mountain segment. The top 10 are all top 10 idiots that should not be allowed to rider there.

Maybe "most people" don't do this kind of crap, but one is one too many.

I'd like to know where you get this opinion from. I ride Burnaby Mountain regularly and one of the "Top 10 Idiots" you refer to. I like using Strava to track my weekly mileage, personal fitness and riding ability both up and downhill. I've shredded the descents as fast as possible for years before Strava was invented, but I always slow down for hikers / other bikers and always say hello as I pass by. I've yet to have a single confrontation on the mountain after 10 years of riding those trails. In riding / trail maintenance / hiking on Burnaby Mountain for years almost entirely all my encounters with rude folks have been dudes on commuter bikes shredding down Joes / Trans-Canada trail, or out of control sketch bags on beater bikes with no helmets. I know a bunch of the other Burnaby Mountain "Top 10 Idiots" and they're about the nicest most courteous people you could wish to meet. There are bad apples in every bunch, but calling an entire group of people out with no grounds is industrial strength weak sauce. Don't believe me, let's go for a ride sometime.

March 2, 2013, 12:33 a.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
Marzocchi Canada

Good folks that Alex and Naz!

Nov. 14, 2012, 8:23 a.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
An Open Letter To Chain Reaction Cycles

I thought his comment regarding CRCs "… avoidance of Australian Goods and Services Taxes, import duties …" interesting. It seems our taxation model almost promotes consumers purchasing online, if for nothing else, to get a 12% savings by not paying HST.

Sept. 21, 2012, 1:06 p.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
Prepare for the 650b Wheel-Size Revolution

I had convinced myself that, no matter how much i liked the concept and the rave reviews from folks i know, there just weren't the funds for the upgrade. Riding one has changed my mind on that too - time to find the funds.

I told you not to ride that thing!

I've spent the last 2 weeks on a 650b Range and there is no question what I'll be buying for my 2013 trail bike. My only (minor) gripe is the fork selection. Damn I'd love a 650b 55RC3.

Sept. 14, 2012, 8:02 a.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
Fox 34 Float 160 - anyone got any time on one?

There are 2 trail settings, not 3: firm and soft, with a huge gap in between

Huh? This is from the Fox website:
[INDENT]Adjustments
Climb/Trail/Descend (3 positions)
Trail adjust tuning range (1, 2, 3)[/INDENT]

I was really hoping that I'd be able to find a happy setting in there somewhere.

Sept. 12, 2012, 10:57 p.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
That Section on A line

Ask Timmigrant how it feels, that's where his forks separated. While manualing one of those drainage ditches…

I got some scars … don't really remember much otherwise.

Sept. 12, 2012, 10:51 p.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
Fox 34 Float 160 - anyone got any time on one?

fair enough, I just thought there were 3 selectable levels of firmness within the "T" mode… perhaps that's only on the "Factory" forks.

is the geo production? just wondering about the sizing/feel.

There are 3 selectable levels of firmness on the "Trail Select" versions of the CTD 34s. I'm not sure what the exact spec on the Killer B Ranges will be. Hopefully the higher end Ranges get the Trail Select. Whether or not those three settings are worth the extra dollars remains to be seen.

Sept. 12, 2012, 10:01 a.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
Fox 34 Float 160 - anyone got any time on one?

interesting, so the fork on that only has the single setting in trail mode. It's probably the one thing that weirds me out about the spec on the 2013 range 1, the dummy damper in the fork.

The Range I'm on is an engineering proto and has a custom build on it, so not indicative of the production bikes. That said all the 34s have that CTD damper, which appears to be the only viable long travel 650b option at the moment. After a couple more rides I'm sure I'll get a better setup dialed in.

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