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Timmigrant's posts

2429 posts found

March 18, 2016, 9:54 p.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
WBP 16

Worth every penny!

Hell yeah! I can't wait!

March 1, 2016, 11:50 p.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
2015 Fiver Feedback / 2016 planning

Anyone else got the itch for a Fiver race?

Itchin' real bad. I was riding the shore the other day and Dre called me out for being fat and slow on the climb up Good Sir Martin.

Feb. 13, 2016, 3:41 p.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
Welcome Alex Woikin & Marzocchi

That's great news, and a great combination! Congrats to Alex and Suspension Werx.

Now if only I could get my hands on a 2016 350 NCR Ti!

Feb. 13, 2016, 3:36 p.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
PSA: wash your bikes before crossing the border

A few years ago I went down with three friends to ride Galbraith. It was a 45 minute wait at the border. Canadian Border guard wouldn't allow us re-entry due to muddy bikes. They diverted us in to the line for the USA border. A lengthy wait there and the US border guard was unwilling to let us in to the USA with muddy bikes. After arguing that it was USA mud he let us back in to the USA. Washed the bikes in Blaine and re-entered Canada after another 45 minute wait. Moral of the story, always wash your bikes when heading back to Canada.

Jan. 1, 2016, 12:03 p.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
2016 Norco Sight C7.2

Tried the OEM base tune from Cane Creek for my first ride with the inline. Can't overstate the difference compared to the Monarch RT, even before tweaking it to my liking! Anyways I then talked to a Norco mechanic who deals with Cane Creek and he believes the base tune is way off and recommended the following as a starting point:

1 large volume spacer (vs 0 OEM)
0 turns HSC (vs 2.5)
10 clicks LSC (vs 5)
1 turn HSR (vs 2.5)
10 clicks LSR (same)

I haven't had a chance to ride with this tune yet… Obviously the biggest difference is to completely back off HSC in favour of volume spacers. Cane Creek seems to agree this is a good idea https://www.canecreek.com/products/suspension/lounge/forum/volume-spacers-vs-high-speed-compression-dampening

Since the OEM tune for the Alu Sight calls for 4 small spacers (4/5th of a large) I'm starting to wonder if the lack of spacers is just a mistake on their website.

I'm running a similar tune on the Range. I found the Inline is on the limit of flowing enough oil on high speed compression for me. The above settings will give good support when pedaling and through corners, but provide excellent bump adsorption.

Dec. 12, 2015, 12:41 p.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
2016 Norco Sight C7.2

I have been using this matte paint protector from a company in Quebec on my matte finish carbon bikes. It's almost invisible once applied. The matte clear isn't even listed on their site, but email them and you can order it. I paid $30 for a 2 foot x 5 foot piece, which is plenty for 2 bikes.
http://vvividvinyl.com/

The bike in this article is covered in the stuff; top tube, down tube, seat stays and chain stays. You can see a seam across "Norco" in one of the close up photos, and you can barely see a difference in the covered vs. uncovered side.
http://nsmb.com/cane-creek-double-barrel-coil-climb-switch/

Oct. 31, 2015, 12:29 a.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
Halloween Fiver

Kinda surprised to hear how few people have ridden the classics.

I noticed on someone's pre-ride Strava/trailforks that after upper Digger they cut back across St. Mary's to climb back to the BP.

We'll be going all the way down to the road.

As said the B route isn't really intended as "racing". Just a fun ride option. It will be spicy with the slick roots.

Glad I put on some fresh sticky rubber last night.

I'm sad I can't make it, but had already planned to host a Rugby World Cup Finals Party at my place. Have fun out there!

Oct. 11, 2015, 12:37 a.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
Bike Maintenance & Record keeping Apps

I personally use Strava. You can add parts to particular bikes on particular days and it'll keep track of the mileage. Easy since I log all my rides on there anyway.

Sept. 22, 2015, 6:05 p.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
Cane Creek Double Barrel Tuning Chat

bumping again so someone can tell me if they have put 2 "big" spacers or if they are using the small spacers (i.e. the big spacers can be cut into 5 small spacers each…)

PM Sent. Sorry for the tardy reply. I guess I hadn't been in here for a little while!

Sept. 10, 2015, 10:46 p.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
Cane Creek Double Barrel Tuning Chat

The best advice was likely DrewMs but it doesn't jive with your train of thought or recent purchase so you choose to ignore it.

Mildly curious, I assume you purchased the shock at a good price?

An Inline is a DBA XV without the piggyback?

The Inline isn't really just a DBA XV without the piggyback. It's a completely different architecture, and the internal fluid routing is different. In my experience on the 160 mm travel Range the Inline was at the limit in flowing enough oil during severe high speed compression. Cane Creek fully admits this and suggests that a 160 mm is on the upper limit of it's intended use. As such I ran minimal HSC on the Inline on the Range, but was really happy with the way the shock performed.

Sept. 10, 2015, 8:08 a.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
Cane Creek Double Barrel Tuning Chat

I'm running 2 and a half of the blue spacers in the DB Inline on the Range. This gives the shock a nice ramp up, allowing less air pressure, better suspension performance at sag, yet good bottom out adsorption. I found on the longer travel Range I had to minimize the HSC and HSR on the Inline. For the Prime as a suggestion extrapolating from my Range settings, try 2 of the blue spacers, one turn out on both the high speed adjusters, and 10-12 clicks out on the low speed adjusters.

Aug. 6, 2015, 12:26 a.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
Crankworx Enduro

Damn that looks like a fun course. If I were racing I'd seriously consider using my downhill bike with a dropper post, and full face helmet.

July 24, 2015, 8:30 a.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
Best all rounder front tyre

This!
Had a HRII on the Surface then switched to DHRII. DH bike was a combo of HRII front/DHRII rear and dual DHRII before going to Magic Marys

Yeah I've noticed the HRII compared to DHRII on 30mm Nancy carbon rims is more of a block profile, similar to the BFG ATs on my truck while the DHRII is more rounded.

I've ran a few DHFs on different bikes in various sizes/compounds and haven't really got what the circle jerk was/is about.

What this guy said. DHR II is awesome. The High Roller 2 is a good tire if it's soft or if you don't push it super hard in the corners. I find the side knobs too supple on the HR II.

I'm a fan of the Magic Mary in Vertstar for the front. I seem to mangle the side knobs on the rear though.

Like mentioned above the Vigilante is a an awesome front tire. Just mounted a High Grip version and rode it last night. Impressive braking traction, and the side knobs worked great, but it was fairly soft conditions.

I too never loved the DHF. It rolled pretty quick, but found it required a ton of lean angle to get any grip out of the side knobs. I always preferred the original High Roller.

July 23, 2015, 10:44 p.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
Low Speed vs High Speed Compression

I agree with James, it looks like your previously understanding might have been backwards.

Blackbird I am certainly no expert, but I personally believe in a near opposite philosophy. For the majority of folks fast rebound isn't the cause of being bucked on jumps. The easiest way to explain this is that more most folks the rear wheel isn't moving through it's rebound stroke until it's left the lip of the jump. I find in most cases folks get bucked off jumps because their body position is too far forward. If the rear suspension is too soft and bottoms out, that too will cause you to be bucked. Being bucked when riding down the trail on holes is generally a sign that the front fork has less high speed compression than the rear.

With suspension tuning is there is no simple statement like, slower rebound adds traction. If you follow that logic to the extreme the rear shock never extends from bottom out and you have a hard tail. Suspension tuning is all about compromises and finding an optimal balance of spring / damping for your riding style. What works for me, will be different to you.

That said I personally like to set my bikes up with relatively more low speed compression damping than high speed compression damping. When your suspension compresses the fluid passes through the low speed compression circuit. The faster the suspension motion, the faster the fluid flows through the low speed compression circuit, which builds pressure in the compression circuit. It's this pressure that resists the motion of your wheel. As the suspension continues to accelerate it builds pressure until the high speed circuit opens. In most suspension the high speed compression adjuster sets the pressure at which the high speed circuit starts to open. This provides an alternate path for the oil to flow and as such the pressure in the fork / shock more slowly increases as more oil flow through the compression circuit. I like a relatively low high speed compression pressure because I ride fairly quickly, like rough trails, and want the suspension to be supple over roots and rocks. However I want relatively high low speed compression to prevent excessive suspension motion when pedaling, pumping through sections, braking and pushing the bike through corners.

Cane Creek's Field Tuning Guide is fairly good at explaining the different between high speed / low speed, and a strategy for getting the most out of your suspension: http://www.canecreek.com/resources/images/home/TFG.pdf

July 23, 2015, 10:08 p.m.
Posts: 2,452
Joined: Jan. 8, 2004
Marzocchi to close for good??

No doubt there are disadvantages but there are huge advantages with air mostly with weight gains and changing air pressure versus springs.

I'm not sure those qualify as huge advantages? Minor weight savings, a 380 C2R2 is 0.2 lbs heavier than a Fox 40 Air with the 380 carrying a shwack more oil. Once you have the right coil spring you're done, no more "did my air spring lose pressure, maybe I should check it, it's a little cold, maybe I'll let it warm up first". Maybe we'll have to agree to disagree.

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