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224 posts found

Nov. 19, 2020, 3:59 p.m.
Posts: 22
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: Cypress Upper Lands Survey is out - IMPORANT IF YOU CARE ABOUT CYPRESS

Thanks for staying on this!  I filled out the survey, even though I'm a Yankee/gringo/'murcan. I let them know in my comments that the world class expert mountain bike trails are a huge asset for commercial real estate and they should leverage that.

Thank you for what you do. Long live Cypress!

Oct. 12, 2020, 10:49 a.m.
Posts: 22
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: Custom Wheels- Which is more important to you? - Hub vs Rims

Posted by: RAHrider

Anyone use the park master spoke key? I have a kinda shit spoke key and I figure its about time I get a proper one.

I've used the master, it's beautiful, but went for the 4-sided SW-40 for my personal kit. For building new wheels it doesn't matter, but truing up beat to shit nipples, the 4-sided is a life saver. It's slower to use, so if you have a tool fetish or build a fair number of wheels, maybe get both.

Oct. 8, 2020, 11:17 a.m.
Posts: 22
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: how bout a good ol fashioned tire thread

I've got some good mileage in various conditions on the 2.6 DHRii EXO+ on the front. Rims are 32mm internal. Cornering and braking are fantastic, but I'm finding it a little bouncy off rocks. I've dropped the pressure to 20.5 psi, and might try 20. This is getting to the lowest pressure I want to go before I'm worried about burping the tire if I land weird off a jump, and keeping proper support on fast corners. OK for winter, but I'm not keen on 20psi on some of my favorite higher speed summer trails up higher in the mountains. 

With the 2.4 I can happily run from 21-24 psi with my preferred faster rebound setting, the 2.6 has a much narrower window. The 2.6 is good enough that I'll run it till the side knobs start cracking, but its back to the 2.4/2.5 next time. Maybe I'll throw in Tannus inserts for the winter to quiet it down a little bit and stay safe with lower pressures.

I was considering getting a hardtail with 2.6's. This is making me reconsider that.

Oct. 8, 2020, 8:49 a.m.
Posts: 22
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: Basic home gym set up

Know your goals, like ReductiMat said. I'm 47 and have been pretty hard on my body, so I focus on injury prevention and keeping old issues at bay. Back, hips, shoulders - focusing on the backside of shoulders, core, and a little bit or all-round strength, which include pushups and pullups. I had a physical therapist friend help me design workouts, and it's none of the "cool" stuff you see jacked people do in commercial gyms. If my workout is more than 30-40 minutes I get totally bored, I'd rather be outside, so I keep it modest.

I ended out going with interlocking floor mat, a sandbag and a couple bands. That said, I'm considering one of those fragile select-a-weight dumbbell sets so I can do overhead presses. I can do quite a lot with this minimal setup.  **** Edit: oh screw that, after watching Comrade Kettlebell, I'm getting a couple of those!  So good!

I used to lift pretty hard with a nice home gym when I was in my late 20's. Got pretty strong for a lean guy, though I did it wrong, and it contributed to a major shoulder injury. Was telemarking on an icy day on some lines around Spanky's Ladder. Lost grip and starting sliding into some steep rocks and had to self arrest, which I did successfully, but it yanked my should pretty good at a weird angle. Tore my rotator to bits, and my doc, a great sports medicine Dr, said my weight lifting made it way worse since my front-of-shoulder and chest were stronger than my back-shoulder. When the adrenaline hit it popped everything forward, combined with the hard torque from a weird angle and I had a 1-year recovery (shoulda had surgery).

Moral of the story, get balanced while you get strong. Bikers hunch forward, so upper back and back of shoulders are key. And don't neglect those hamstrings to balance out our over-developed quads.

Fast forward 20 years and I started doing swim workouts to enable my love of surfing when I go on winter vacation. I also have a desk job and ride bikes, and did a lot of trail building. Again, lack of body balance and I developed thoracic outlet syndrome, which started as finger numbness on rides and got pretty bad, and my lower back always went out. Had to stop trail building at this point. Got set up on a program of strengthening/shortening the back of my neck and back of shoulders. Doc also said to do as much backstroke as crawlstroke on swim workouts.

The focus on my back with band work, hip hinges, and back bridges have really helped my shoulder and back injuries. Plus my posture is great! I'm really quite stoked on my ability to stay healthy now even with a f'd up back.

40-45 was rough for me. I was one of those guys who could crash and and mostly be able to shrug it off and throw dirt with abandon. Then BOOM, 40 hit and I was always messed up. I had to learn the hard way, but my current program of core and balanced strength has me riding long descents without stopping and happily doing trail work again, though I need to stay smart about moving rocks.

Oct. 6, 2020, 11:21 a.m.
Posts: 22
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: how bout a good ol fashioned tire thread

Posted by: mrraulduke

I just set up a set of Conti Baron and Kaiser yesterday after a summer on the Michi Wild Enduros. I haven't put them to a wet test, but i did aim at some roots i'd avoid. i dint die, this was a good thing. with the weather getting ready to turn, I look forward to testing out the wet performance. I normally run a MM up front, DHRII in the rear for winters here.

The Kaiser felt a bit faster rolling than the Michi out back on an easy logging road climb. it looks quite ramped.

I'm Conti-curious. Haven't ridden that brand in ages, but I know they have good rubber.

Wouldn't the Kaiser be a better front, and the Baron rear?  Baron looks fast, but those side knobs look pretty wimpy (I tend to kill wimpy side knobs in weeks **cough cough Dissector cough ***).  I also prefer strong braking in the front, the rear can just follow along in the slop.

My dream rear rear tire is slightly faster rolling than a DHR 'Terra, but with better wet root grip than the Aggressor.

Sept. 29, 2020, 9:01 p.m.
Posts: 22
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: how bout a good ol fashioned tire thread

DHRii makes a better front (and rear) tire than a DHF in every way.  Get the DHR. 

I can’t believe it took me this long to try the DHR up front. I’m even (gasp!) trying a 2.6 just for grins, which feels pretty great after a few rides in tech/loamy/wet. Fairly wide 32mm rims, so not sure how it would be on something narrower. Last front tire was an Assegai - good tire but I like the DHR better.

Sept. 18, 2020, 7:46 p.m.
Posts: 22
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: Anyone ride an E13 TRS Race?

Posted by: RAHrider

I'm on a wide rim and run low pressure so that probably makes it way worse.

Yeah, I’m on wide-ish 32mm rims. E.thirteen’s rims were 28mm wide when these came out, so I suspect they’re optimized for that narrower profile. I’d give them a shot again if I was running narrower rims.

Sept. 17, 2020, 6:34 p.m.
Posts: 22
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: Anyone ride an E13 TRS Race?

I tried the Gen 3's. Agreed that they're really slow rolling. My theory is that they're (still!!) a really square tire, so the side knobs must be making a lot of contact when pedaling along. The MOPO version I had on the front had wicked good grip on wet roots/rocks. I like their casings. The low center knobs give up traction to the DHR, Assegai, Mary in anything deep, sloppy or soft while simultaneously rolling slow, so I quit running them.  If I lived in Squamish or spent a lot of time in the park they might be my tire of choice, but I'd want a sub 30mm wide rim to round them out a little bit.

June 26, 2020, 10:11 a.m.
Posts: 22
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: How much rise?

Don't forget that wider bars need to be run a little higher, as a wider hand position pulls your torso down. 

Second the opinion about playing with spacers. I'd make adjustments in 5mm increments if you can. I find 10mm to be a pretty big change in feel. I run most of the time a fairly high setup 38mm rise Deity Blacklabel bars with 10mm under them and 10mm over on an XL Patrol (I'm 6'2").  I swap a spacer and go 5mm lower when I'm doing a high-country ride with lots of tech climbs and no boosty moves, helps keep the front down, but I don't like that setup for my everyday rowdy riding with lots of xcdh and mostly non-tech climbs.

June 15, 2020, 5:50 p.m.
Posts: 22
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: hub bearings

Enduros are pretty good for a reasonably priced bearing. They're well known and easy to buy, so that's what most folks use. What hub? Sealing is probably going to be more or less the same between decent brands. Once you're using "good enough" bearings like Enduro, it's the overall hub design that's really going to determine how long they run in crap weather.

Due to tolerance mis-matching (bore oversized by .001 and bearing undersized by .001), you can get unlucky on certain hub-bearing combos and get play while everything is theoretically "fine". For example, plenty of people (including me) have had slight play running Enduro brand in Hope rear hubs. Confirm with someone who knows that hub really well whether your hub will happily take any particular brand of bearings. This is where experienced mechanics are worth their weight in gold.

I get good life even on lesser OEM Hope bearings by popping the bearing seals and cleaning if necessary, then stuffing them full of Phil's grease several times a year. In pivots and pedals I use heavier PM600 Military grease. Bike greases are all kind of wimpy, so I always go heavier if efficiency isn't at stake.

June 15, 2020, 3:34 p.m.
Posts: 22
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: Maxxis DHF MaxxGrip or Assegai MaxxGrip

Posted by: Ouch
Thanks for the feedback guys!
I should've mentioned I'm running 29ers. Sounds like my best bet is to go with the DHF MaxxGrip.

On a 29er you could run DHR MaxxGrip on the front, in either DD or EXO. Sadly, they don't appear to offer DHR MaxxGrip in EXO for 27.5.

June 15, 2020, 3:30 p.m.
Posts: 22
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: Maxxis DHF MaxxGrip or Assegai MaxxGrip

Maxxis really needs to add two more trail tire versions, just for me.

  • Assegai EXO+ in MaxxGrip
  • Aggressor EXO in 3C MaxxTerra.

Please Maxxis, pretty please?

I'm happy with my heavier wheelset options (Mary SG UltraSoft with DHR DD MaxxTerra).

On my lighter everyday wheelset I've been running a front Assegai EXO+, and it really needs MaxxGrip to be worth it. I disagree with the comments about it glogging, it's brilliant in gooey loam, but here around Seattle we don't have truly sticky mud, so YMMV.  It's just on wet roots that the lack of MaxxGrip reaches up and slaps you every once in a while.

Also tried the Dissector 3C rear in EXO on my trail tires for faster rolling since I'm doing a lot of bigger rides. Feel great, but then the wimpy little side knobs started cracking after only 10 rides or so, WAY faster than happens on a DHR in the same compound. 

I love the Aggressor, but not when it's wet out. If they just released it in a MaxxTerra EXO, I could run that all year for faster rolling without killing myself on rock faces. DC compound sucks when it's wet.

June 8, 2020, 10:16 a.m.
Posts: 22
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: broken rear hub axle

I've done it a few times. Twice due to crappy design + aggressive hackery (old Chris King design that was updated long ago, and some OEM branded hub). Other times it was due to frame axle coming loose, which will kill a hub in short order. Add on bent cheapo hub axles, and I could add a few more to the list.

There's no bike part that can't break given enough abuse, time or neglect. I've killed every single bike part in various ways over the years.

May 31, 2020, 11:32 p.m.
Posts: 22
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: Hambini on bottom brackets.

I feel (somewhat) vindicated. I’ve been railing against threaded BB’s in carbon frames for years. That bonded interface for your aluminum threads is just an extra part (incredibly high-stress junction) waiting to fail and ruin your precious frame right after the warranty runs out. Or all the companies now offering really long warranties on their carbon superbikes... holy shit, threaded BB’s are going to get really expensive for you.

I’ll take pressfit every time in a carbon frame. Aluminum frame, I’m happy with threaded, but either way works. Worst case scenario you need a Wheels manufacturing BB to solve creaking in a pressfit.

May 16, 2020, 10:36 a.m.
Posts: 22
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017
Re: Knolly bearings replacement

Posted by: RAHrider

With regards to cleaning and repacking bearings, I have always just replaced sealed bearings but I decided I'd give it a go on an old raceface bb on my single speed that was a bit crunchy. I watched a youtube video then went at it with a small screwdriver to get the seals off - that part went smooth. When I did the first one, the bearings were all visible so i cleaned them with a rag and then packed in a ton of fresh grease. When I went on to the second one, there was another "seal underneath" - I didn't realize the cartridge was in backwards so you couldn't see the bearings. Of course I went at prying at the retainer and partially removed it but couldn't get it to seat in again so I ended up just pulling it out. Now I have loose bearings on one side. Ended up throwing some grease in and putting the seal on. Seems to spin nicely.

I'm going to go and get a new BB but anyone ever run a bb bearing with no retainer ring?

What do you guys use to clean the bearings? Do you do it differently for a bb cup where you only have access to one side of the bearing?

Thanks for your advice

My method, whether doing it from one side still in the bike or removed is basically the same. I usually do this in the frame, once I pull them it's usually time to replace.

Pop the seal off, and shoot the bearings with penetrating oil. Spin them a few times, blast with a blow gun on your compressor (makes a mess, so beware), shoot with oil again, repeat until they seem totally free of gunk. Then blast them one final time with the blow gun to remove any remaining penetrating oil. It's a quick job.

This works without a compressor blow gun, just takes more time and more penetrating oil to get them clean. If you think the penetrating oil will get inside your frame while doing this, I'd use Triflow instead. It makes a fantastic (though expensive) cleaning oil, and won't dry sticky or caustic the way WD-40 or other penetrators can.

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