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BikeYoke Revive 2.0 213mm Dropper Post Long-Term Review - Aug. 12, 2021, 11:52 p.m.

Thanks for reviewing the post. That indeed was a good long-term reivew! Gret to hear you liked it.

About REVIVE MAX (34.9) in longer than 185 : Expect to hear from us in just a couple of weeks. ;-)

BikeYoke Sagma Suspension Saddle - July 25, 2021, 1:21 a.m.

The bolts which attach the bumpers to the shell are torqued to spec @ 2NM only. That is not much and one should not overtorque it with more than 2.5Nm.
The important thing is to use loctite. Blue is enough and stronger is also OK, as long as you can open it again. ;-)
Even with the blue loctite, you will notice, that the loctite did its job, when you notice the sound and feeling of the glue breaking loose when opening the bolts.

BikeYoke Sagma Suspension Saddle - July 25, 2021, 1:15 a.m.

The protected edges are something we've been thingking about, too. However, in all our testing and testriding, the material proved to be extremely sturdy. We chose this material because I knew it from my Adidas soccer boots, which use a siliar material:

https://www.intersport.de/schuhe/fussballschuhe/rasen-fussballschuhe/143072/adidas-fussball-schuhe-stollen-predator-18.1-sg/?number=4059809025680&gclid=Cj0KCQjwl_SHBhCQARIsAFIFRVW5l92KVXInByZDWAXvj2DskCPWx8sZc22xbKz6-ryVoK5lbz9ebdUaAuDBEALw_wcB
I was surprised of how much this extremely think material can take a beating, even from other metal studs. can take a beatiSo we knew the base metarial and tried to copy the same composition.

I-Beam was not a real option for us, and the reason is very simple: While the SAGMA's suspension concept could possibly live with the almost non-existing flex/comfort of the I-Beam, the I-Beam design had very specific reuirements on post head design. Making a valve underneath the I-Beam design for instance is basically impossible. 
But obviously the main reason is that we DO want our saddle to be compatible with basically any normal post and not only work with our posts. I am not a fan of proprietary designs, if it does not have a clear advantage. 
And as I said, I can not sa, that the bolts or the creaking is a real problem. Otherwise we would have heard much more from customers about it. You would definitely read about it in the comments in the IBC-forum link, which I send before. ;-)

BikeYoke Sagma Suspension Saddle - July 23, 2021, 5:54 a.m.

...The point about the unneccessity of exchangeable rails I will definitely keep in mind, although this is indeed one more feature we thought could distinguish the saddle frokm others.

Most of my riding buddies managed to ben the rails of their saddles at least once - no matter shich brand or model. I have broken carbon rails myself, I have bend steel rails - shit happens. If you manage to bend the rails ona SAGMA, you can easily replace them. That is one of the ideas of exchangeable rails.

And I would like to mention again, that the creaking is not really an issue in the overall perspective. Not from what we receive from customers as feedback.

For what it's worth:

Here is a link to a German forum-thread about the SAGMA with hundreds of comments, also giving feedback and there is barely anything mentioned about creaking.

https://www.mtb-news.de/forum/t/bikeyoke-sagma-mtb-sattel-ausprobiert-wenn-der-hueftoeffner-mit-koernern-flext.941006/page-14#posts

If it's inappropriate to place the link here, please feel free to delete it, I just thought it might be interesting.

BikeYoke Sagma Suspension Saddle - July 23, 2021, 5:53 a.m.

...The saddles, which we sent to NSMB for the review were assembled before we found this out. That should be the reason, why the bolts initially came loose and maybe also caused the creaking.

So once the material has settled, the bolts should not become loose anymore. We have then changed the assembly process so this will not happen anymore.

What I am wondering about is, what Andrew said, that they kept getting loose. If they do come loose, they should only come loose once and after that it should be OK, especially if loctite was applied. The blue loctite, which we use in assembly is usually more than enough. That's odd and I am not sure why.

What I can say is (and I am being really honest), that we barely hear of bolts keep getting loose or of any noticeable complaints about creaking. So far we are very peased with the feedback we are receiving from customers and from media.

So, of course it sucks for that Andrew had this issue, especially  during a review, but it is what it is. It was his experience, and then he needs to write about it. That is perfectly correct and absolutely fair.

Generally, the article is still very positive for me, because even these unusual issues he could solve very easily.

So, Thank you very much again!

...to be continued below

BikeYoke Sagma Suspension Saddle - July 23, 2021, 5:52 a.m.

...However, in our first production run in early 2020 we had some issue with the covering and we only had little number of saddles in the market. We then took our time (several months) to find a new process for covering and slightly changed the layer composition on our covering.

When we then did the first bigger production batch of the SAGMAs (in early 2021, if I remeber correctly out of the top of my head), we found out (after a few weeks after delivery), that sometimes bolts needed to be re-tightened, although we had used properly calibrated torque tools and blue loctite during installation on all of them.

So after thinking and evaluating we figured what happened was following:

The bumpers are made of carbon reinforced Nylon. Now when you apply pressure on this material (or on any material for that matter) for a longer period of time, it will creep.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creep_(deformation)

So lets say you torque the bumper bolts to spec with 2Nm. The bumper material, however will slightly deform/compress under the pressure of the bolt head over several days, thus losing pre-tension on the bolted connection - et voilà, the bolt will not be at 2Nm anymore, although it did not move. You can not really measure this deformation as it is too little, but the result remains, nevertheless.

...to be continued below...

BikeYoke Sagma Suspension Saddle - July 23, 2021, 5:51 a.m.

However, in our first production run in early 2020 we had some issue with the covering and we only had little number of saddles in the market. We then took our time (several months) to find a new process for covering and slightly changed the layer composition on our covering.

When we then did the first bigger production batch of the SAGMAs (in early 2021, if I remeber correctly out of the top of my head), we found out (after a few weeks after delivery), that sometimes bolts needed to be re-tightened, although we had used properly calibrated torque tools and blue loctite during installation on all of them.

So after thinking and evaluating we figured what happened was following:

The bumpers are made of carbon reinforced Nylon. Now when you apply pressure on this material (or on any material for that matter) for a longer period of time, it will creep.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creep_(deformation)

So lets say you torque the bumper bolts to spec with 2Nm. The bumper material, however will slightly deform/compress under the pressure of the bolt head over several days, thus losing pre-tension on the bolted connection - et voilà, the bolt will not be at 2Nm anymore, although it did not move. You can not really measure this deformation as it is too little, but the result remains, nevertheless.

BikeYoke Sagma Suspension Saddle - July 23, 2021, 5:51 a.m.

I can. ;-)

First of all I would like to thank Andrew and Cam for this really extensive test and review of our saddle(s).

While I obviously did not like everything I read (;-)) I always appreciate honest real-life, real-worl feedback and it f there is a problem, I should be mentioned.

I have to say, that we barely hear from customers about creaking saddles and we've sold a ton of them so far.

Of course, creaking is something we knew would be the biggest fear of customers and we knew we had to avoid this issue from the beginning. We wouldn't have come out with the SAGMA, if we were not sure, that creaking is not more of an issue (more less so) than on any other saddle on the market.

...to be continued below...

BikeYoke Divine Dropper Post Reviewed - June 24, 2020, 4:23 a.m.

The REVIVE just has superior performance over the DIVINE and you can feel it on the remote and on the post itself.

You can express it very easily in numbers. The REVIVE requires about 25% less force on lever and 35% less force on the drop force in factory settings. You can caclulate by the difference in pressures plus a little bit of more friction on the dynamic seals, because they are much bigger.
Although the DIVINE is on par with other posts on the market, the REVIVE is playing in her very own league in terms of smoothness drop forces.

People who have not tried a REVIVE before won't really bother, but I have also heard of people who never had a problem with the original Reverb Trigger or plunger remote - until they tried a proper remote.

You know there are people who pay a premium of more than 70€ to get golden colored dropper posts without the slightest noticeable difference in performance to a black one of the same brand. Our REVIVE requires less upcharge, yet you get a noticeable different performance.

BikeYoke Divine Dropper Post Reviewed - June 24, 2020, 1:41 a.m.

Let me swing my magic wand and give me a couple more weeks. 200mm is a little short though, don't you think ;-)

BikeYoke Divine Dropper Post Reviewed - June 23, 2020, 7:25 a.m.

Sacki here.

We still believe 34.9 is the future, unless a stupid other standard is created. 34.9 is an existing and well known standard and offers all we want/need in terms of strenght and stiffness to create drops up to around 230mm. More travel is maybe not nonsense but it would require a lot of compromises for the frame design, too, so it does not really make a lot of sense. 

34.9 offers great balance between stifness and weight.
REVIVE 160/34.9: 590g
Fox Transfer (2020) 150/31.6: 585g 
Despite 10mm more travel and a 34.9 oversize structure, the REVIVE MAX weighs more or less the same as competitor of the world's probably best bicycle suspension manufacturer. There is not a lot of weight penalty on a 34.9 platform, but the performance gain is immense.
Why don't we have a 34.9 DIVINE? 
We do have it ready in the box, but we simply can not afford another product line without other/more bike manufacturers jumping on the right train or at least getting an OE deal, which would justify our invest this complete new product line. This is expensive!

Why All Dropper Posts should be 34.9 - Dec. 6, 2019, 5:53 a.m.

Hi, this is Sacki of BikeYoke speaking.

The idea behind this is nice.
However, please do not forget, that the bushings in your seatube will need to be extremly well calibrated and perfectly in-line with each other. If this is not the case, your post will get stuck or have play.
In the majority, we are still talking about aluminum frames (and they are having a comeback on high end bikes now, too). Those AL-frames are welded and suffer a certain amount of distortion after welding (heat). Seattubes naturally are not 100% straight. 
Frame makers will (and they do) hate you for mekingg them produce a frame with that tight tolerances. Frame makers are not keen on doing this. At all.
Then, you are also restricted to certrain frame designs, as the seattube needs to be straight and can not have a bend. Implementing dropper into the frame will simply not work with most of the current designs on the market. Designs like the new Santas, EVIL, the new Spesh Enduro (which IMHO are amongst the top-performing suspensions) are simply not compatible. And so are more than 90% of other frames.

So again: The idea is good, but at the moment an integrated dropper requires too much compromise on top-performing rear-suspension. Droppers need to go up and down reliably. That is what the customer cares about. Who would sacrifice kinematics performance for an integrated dropper that does not make a reall difference for the ride experience. 

P.S: You may want to check in some forums or with some owners or dealers and ask them about reliability, then you may know, why I personally do not think, that it is a good idea.

BikeYoke Revive Dropper Post Reviewed - Feb. 7, 2019, 12:27 a.m.

OK, now I remember: Anyway, hanging the bike on the wall or storing it laying down or in any other way should not cause anything to seize up and make the remote hard to push. I really don´t know, what is happaning with your post, if it is not due to temperature change.

BikeYoke Revive Dropper Post Reviewed - Feb. 6, 2019, 5:04 a.m.

Did I really say it was a mystery? Unless there were some other factors, that I am not aware of,  I am almost sure, the reason is, what I explain below in the next comment.

BikeYoke Revive Dropper Post Reviewed - Feb. 6, 2019, 5:02 a.m.

That what you both describe is very likey coming from temperature differences between riding and storing the bike, but from not in which position you store the bike.

Explanation: If you rid in very cold temps and then store the bike inside the house with about +20€, then the oil will expand and create very high pressure inside the lockout-chamber. This pressure needs to be overcome by either the remote or by engaging the reset function (do not use the quick reset lever, but a regular 4mm allen key, as you quick reset lever my shear off).

How to avoid this form happening: Store the post while it is not fully extended, dropped about half an inch. Then the post can move, which gives the oil room to expand.

We actually do explain this on our website and also in this thread, which is very helpful in general:

https://forums.mtbr.com/components/bikeyoke-revive-info-tipps-tricks-troubleshooting-1087156.html#post13973870

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