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Drawknife for Bark Stripping

April 18, 2020, 8:52 a.m.
Posts: 69
Joined: March 13, 2017

I have found a 5" blade draw knife at KMS Tools, Lee Valley has one that is 9" long. I don't have any experience using one, so my guess is the wider one will be better/more puroposed to stipping bark off logs. Anybody feedback on other tools I could use for this purpose (obviously needs to be easier than an axe) and I won't be using it enough to justify a chainsaw attachment.


 Last edited by: TonyJ on April 18, 2020, 9:10 a.m., edited 1 time in total.
April 18, 2020, 9:04 a.m.
Posts: 17835
Joined: Oct. 28, 2003

I haven't used various lengths and done a comparison but the engineer in me tells you to draw a circle (the tree) with a tangential straight line (the knife). The knife only touches one single point in the middle.

From experience, they only cut a couple inch wide strip so length only matters if you want to show how big your knife is (that’s what she said!).


 Last edited by: heckler on April 18, 2020, 9:05 a.m., edited 1 time in total.
April 18, 2020, 9:08 a.m.
Posts: 17835
Joined: Oct. 28, 2003

The longer one is likely better for hand clearance if you've got massive girth but the big old trees aren't usually whats getting stripped.

Damn, the puns write themselves.


 Last edited by: heckler on April 18, 2020, 9:08 a.m., edited 1 time in total.
April 18, 2020, 9:13 a.m.
Posts: 69
Joined: March 13, 2017

I was thinking the same thing (I mean, about my knife length), but wouldn't the longer overall length help with leverage for cutting (not sure if that is what she said?)

Are you using one yourself?

More compact would be better for carrying purposes (definately no what she said), especially when I am hauling the chainsaw.

April 18, 2020, 9:53 a.m.
Posts: 17835
Joined: Oct. 28, 2003

We use only blowdown dead cedar which usually has bark able to strip off by hand. I use a hatchet or wedge, or wait long enough till it falls off by hand.  Nothing extra to carry that way.


 Last edited by: heckler on April 18, 2020, 9:54 a.m., edited 1 time in total.
April 18, 2020, 3:51 p.m.
Posts: 5
Joined: July 23, 2006

I find the 9 inch much easier to use that smaller ones. Mainly for ergonomics.  Great tools when preparing stringers, saves so much time.

April 18, 2020, 6:57 p.m.
Posts: 69
Joined: March 13, 2017

Got one of these (blue one), works like holy shit.... Work smarter, not harder.

Best part is I can modify stringers to fit slats.

https://www.ochsenkopf.com/en/products/tools-for-carpenters/drawing-knives/

April 19, 2020, 8:28 a.m.
Posts: 17835
Joined: Oct. 28, 2003

You did say for bark stripping. 🤤. 

Shaping stringers it sounds like a great tool, definitely go longer for leverage.

April 19, 2020, 8:47 p.m.
Posts: 69
Joined: March 13, 2017

Yup, did say bark stripping, like you say, most of the bark peels quite easily. With the tool it gets everything easier and has the bonus of helping shape the stringer when needed. 

It makes the work quicker, so I am quite happy to spend a few bucks to make my life/work easier. Plus it is something I will purchase once, and never have to buy it again.

Money well spent for me.

April 20, 2020, 8:20 a.m.
Posts: 17
Joined: April 23, 2008

I've been using this drawknife which has been pretty good after sharpening it on the bench grinder. Either way peeling stringers sucks. Dog for scale.

https://www.amazon.ca/Timber-Tuff-Tools-TMB-08DS-Pealer/dp/B00DS5QS9Q

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