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Trail use etiquette

May 6, 2019, 9:42 p.m.
Posts: 1106
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002

What is it? What do you think it should be? And even if you don't like them, if ebikes are allowed how should they fit into the lobsterarchy, err I mean hierarchy of trail etiquette? Feel free to disagree with people's ideas but keep it respectful and say why you think something isn't practical. One thing to keep in mind as well is how trail classification may fit into things, ie climbing only, mtb only/primary, hiking only/primary, ebikes allowed, etc.

I'll start with what I think should be the basis for most interactions is that the person who would have the greatest energy output loss, ie uphill vs downhill rider, should have the right of way. The problem with this of course is it means evaluating each situation on it's own merit especially when it comes to multi-use trails. I think this is where having trail designations really helps. So say on an mtb primary trail hikers should always yield to riders, and likewise on hiking primary trails riders should always yield to riders. The same thing for ebikers, on an mtb primary trail ebikes always have to yield to mtb's and vice versa. 

The NSMBA lists 7 rules of trail etiquette, but imo it's time they were significantly updated:

The seven commandments of trail riding:

1.Ride on open trails only.
2. Respect other trail users. 
3. Respect the environment. 
4. Always stay on the trail. 
5. Ride don't slide. 
6. Pack it out. 
7. Know your limits.

https://nsmba.ca/trail-etiquette/

context is everything

May 7, 2019, 10:22 a.m.
Posts: 699
Joined: Nov. 18, 2015

Carry the things that you may need.

I carry a pack filled with things I need and its hot and heavy. While I don't mind helping someone in need, when you're riding with just a bottle and you get a flat up top, Im getting frustrated giving away my spare tubes and waiting around for you to change your flat while using my tools and pump.


 Last edited by: Ddean on May 7, 2019, 10:23 a.m., edited 1 time in total.
May 7, 2019, 10:42 a.m.
Posts: 1136
Joined: Sept. 30, 2006

Posted by: Ddean

Carry the things that you may need.

I carry a pack filled with things I need and its hot and heavy. While I don't mind helping someone in need, when you're riding with just a bottle and you get a flat up top, Im getting frustrated giving away my spare tubes and waiting around for you to change your flat while using my tools and pump.

I agree with this completely.  I carry quite a few tools/parts in case of breakage or failure as well.  Im more than happy to help out a fellow rider who might find a circumstance that is beyond the 'usual' trailside repair.  If you dont have a tube or a pump (two essentials IMO), Im less inclined to give up my spare.

May 7, 2019, 6:11 p.m.
Posts: 1164
Joined: Feb. 26, 2015

Posted by: shoreboy

Posted by: Ddean

Carry the things that you may need.

I carry a pack filled with things I need and its hot and heavy. While I don't mind helping someone in need, when you're riding with just a bottle and you get a flat up top, Im getting frustrated giving away my spare tubes and waiting around for you to change your flat while using my tools and pump.

I agree with this completely.  I carry quite a few tools/parts in case of breakage or failure as well.  Im more than happy to help out a fellow rider who might find a circumstance that is beyond the 'usual' trailside repair.  If you dont have a tube or a pump (two essentials IMO), Im less inclined to give up my spare.

The only way the unprepared are going to learn is by not giving up your only spare tube. 

What do you guys carry?

Tube, pump, levers, sidewall tear patch, multi tool, tubeless plugs, zip ties, pair of semi worn brake pads. A bit of duct tape and on the big days a small bugspray bottle and some first aid stuff including pain killers and antihistamines in case someone has an allergic reaction to a sting.

It's all pretty light in my hipbelt/pack why people ride with none of these is beyond me.

May 7, 2019, 8:39 p.m.
Posts: 5486
Joined: April 10, 2005

Zip ties, black tape, space blanket and a flashlight are all good things to pack.

May 7, 2019, 8:53 p.m.
Posts: 832
Joined: March 18, 2017

Strava everything at all times! 

#ferdaboys #doitforig

May 7, 2019, 9:13 p.m.
Posts: 11002
Joined: June 4, 2008

Posted by: Endur-Bro

Strava everything at all times! 

#ferdaboys #doitforig

Are you going to ride bikes this year.

May 8, 2019, 12:50 a.m.
Posts: 12676
Joined: Nov. 24, 2002

Carrying the already mentioned things is a must, I like to add TP on loonger rides, at times I like to carry a folding saw as well to clear deadfall. And enough food. 

Concerning trail etiquette, I ride almost exclusively on multi-use trails, so I have gotten used to either come to a full stop (on tight and twisty singletrack) when meeting hikers and equestrians although most horses hear me well in advance and the riders have time to react. Still.... I think it has something to do with courtesy and manners. I always say Hi as well, despite from a few rotten apples most hikers and equestrians are thankful and up for a small chat. 

Uphill riders have a right of way on multi-directional trails in my opinion. I no longer fall for my mokey brqin who is hellbent on Strava. 

Kind of like using common sense. And what is important to not leave skids and thrashed trails on multi-use ones.

"You don't learn from experience. You learn from reflecting on the experience."
- Kristen Ulmer

May 8, 2019, 8:11 a.m.
Posts: 276
Joined: Nov. 25, 2013

In my waist pack: I have my spare tire/tools/CO2 + a small first aid kit from MEC - that thing has saved my ass and others over the years. I would recommend picking it up for everyone. It is the size of a small wallet and has key things to get you back to your car.

May 8, 2019, 9:21 a.m.
Posts: 699
Joined: Nov. 18, 2015

Anyone carry Bear spray?

May 8, 2019, 9:46 a.m.
Posts: 1136
Joined: Sept. 30, 2006

Not bear spray, but bear bangers and flares.  Thankfully havent had to use either yet, but we did run into a bear two weeks in a row riding in Squamish.


 Last edited by: shoreboy on May 8, 2019, 10:18 a.m., edited 1 time in total.
May 8, 2019, 10:18 a.m.
Posts: 1164
Joined: Feb. 26, 2015

Posted by: Ddean

Anyone carry Bear spray?

Locally no.

In Golden, Nelson, The Chilcotins a big yes.

Be sure to make sure the plastic wrap is off the spray bottle before headed out. Seems silly and obvious but I have had to point it out to a few people ( mostly hikers )over the last few years that you will never get it unwrapped in time with a Grizzly bearing down on you.

Have come across many black bears in the past running/ riding. The only instance that was concerning was I was chased down the techyist section of arm pump in Sun Peaks. I almost hit the big guy ( came out of nowhere ) as I went by him and he chased me down the trail. That was freaky... I find that the bears near the resorts are used to people somewhat and usually avoid us at all costs. Especially the ones sleeping one the putting greens. Too funny


 Last edited by: Brocklanders on May 8, 2019, 10:23 a.m., edited 1 time in total.
May 8, 2019, 10:58 a.m.
Posts: 133
Joined: Nov. 19, 2002

Posted by: shoreboy

Not bear spray, but bear bangers and flares. Thankfully havent had to use either yet, but we did run into a bear two weeks in a row riding in Squamish.

spray is the only effective deterrent, a work colleague is a grizzly bear expert with extensive experience in Kananaskis, Banff and says having it accessible and ready to go is pretty much the only thing that will work in an attack/charge situation. Bangers are easy to use incorrectly and can make a situation worse by overshooting the bear and having it scared towards you, better to group up, make noise, make yourselves big (bike overhead), and slowly move yourself away from the bear.


 Last edited by: FlipFantasia on May 8, 2019, 11 a.m., edited 1 time in total.
May 8, 2019, 11:02 a.m.
Posts: 699
Joined: Nov. 18, 2015

I see bears and generally they don't spook me at all - I actually hit a bear that knocked me off my bike in the early 90s and almost hit another one a few weeks later (both in the Gatineau Park). Ive never seen a Grizzly but I don't ride (or at least have not yet) in an area where I would see one.

Its more cougars that I think of.....and really mostly re my doggo.

May 8, 2019, 11:14 a.m.
Posts: 1136
Joined: Sept. 30, 2006

Posted by: FlipFantasia

Posted by: shoreboy

Not bear spray, but bear bangers and flares. Thankfully havent had to use either yet, but we did run into a bear two weeks in a row riding in Squamish.

spray is the only effective deterrent, a work colleague is a grizzly bear expert with extensive experience in Kananaskis, Banff and says having it accessible and ready to go is pretty much the only thing that will work in an attack/charge situation. Bangers are easy to use incorrectly and can make a situation worse by overshooting the bear and having it scared towards you, better to group up, make noise, make yourselves big (bike overhead), and slowly move yourself away from the bear.

I would agree that bangers are also a bit of a last resort.  Noisy groups and patience (we waited for about 20 mins for the last bear to move along out of our path) are the best course of action (at least for black bears).

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