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Trail signage on sanctioned trails

Nov. 16, 2020, 4:13 p.m.
Posts: 108
Joined: Oct. 17, 2012

I know this is going to stir it up, but why is there no clear signage on trails saying "MTB only" or "hiking only" on specific trails? is this something the NSMBA has considered? it seems to work fine in other regions.

It just seems dangerous on fast committed trails where you come around a corner and there is a little dog or a 2 year old toddler and you have to slam on the brakes.

Nov. 16, 2020, 4:53 p.m.
Posts: 723
Joined: March 15, 2013

What trail are you referring to? 

Sure not everything is signed but there are definitely quite a few.

Nov. 16, 2020, 6 p.m.
Posts: 941
Joined: Nov. 6, 2006

Posted by: seanluge

It just seems dangerous on fast committed trails where you come around a corner and there is a little dog or a 2 year old toddler and you have to slam on the brakes.

Welcome to COVID-19. I think hiking has become the most popular family activity right now. If it’s not raining they’ll be out.

Nov. 16, 2020, 6:02 p.m.
Posts: 108
Joined: Oct. 17, 2012

Corkscrew, Pingu, JD, Severed, Boogieman/Nights. Maybe I'm visually impaired and never noticed the signs?

Nov. 16, 2020, 6:30 p.m.
Posts: 350
Joined: Aug. 10, 2012

Posted by: FLATCH

Posted by: seanluge

Welcome to COVID-19. I think hiking has become the most popular family activity right now. If it’s not raining they’ll be out.

Pretty much...but so has family mountain biking (same deal re: rain). If you haven't noticed, it's pretty damned busy between Mtn Hwy parking lot and Bobsled. ..and the summer was so busy, riding up Griffin and KOS  was like being a salmon swimming upstream with all the families riding down. That's fine....they should be out enjoying the trails...on bike or on foot. It's a new world. We just have to adjust.

Like the inference to new hikers, new riders may also not know what is hiking primary or riding primary.

Signage isn't perfect, so let NSMBA, Metro, and DNV know. Whether you're a hiker, trail runner, or rider.

Nov. 16, 2020, 6:37 p.m.
Posts: 1590
Joined: Aug. 6, 2009

I can't find the thread, but I thought someone had explained that the NSMBA isn't able to designate trails as "MTB Only", the best they can say is "MTB Downhill Primary", and leave it to people to use their judgement on whether hiking/running down, or up, it would be a good idea.

I've noticed that Boogie Nights now has a "Do Not Enter" sign at the exit, but a lot of trails don't.

I was running on Seymour on Saturday morning, and the number of hikers/runners/bikers was crazy.  To the point that it was almost comically inconvenient for everyone... when I went through the Mushroom/Powerline intersection there were about a dozen people standing around all politely offering the right-of-way to each other.


 Last edited by: PaulB on Nov. 16, 2020, 6:47 p.m., edited 4 times in total.
Nov. 16, 2020, 8:16 p.m.
Posts: 17893
Joined: Oct. 28, 2003

Posted by: seanluge

Maybe I'm visually impaired and never noticed the signs?

Slow down and read the signs.   

Most trails have trailhead signs on a 4x4 post, very few say bikes only (Bobsled, Empress bypass which had a hiking only bypass built). 

See Page 12 for lots more about signs, and then Page 6:

https://nsmba.ca/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/NorthShoreMountainBikeAssociation101-March-2018-1.pdf#page6

#trailsforall

Nov. 16, 2020, 9:44 p.m.
Posts: 108
Joined: Oct. 17, 2012

What I meant to say Heckler is I have never notice any signs saying MTB only or hiking only, except on Boogie nights. I just think it would be a wise move considering the traffic.

Nov. 16, 2020, 10:28 p.m.
Posts: 17893
Joined: Oct. 28, 2003

Please see page 12 for examples of both.   The key answer to your suggestion is “The Land Manager is the final authority on signage.”  

Most trails are multi-use, trails for all to enjoy.   Yes, this pandemic sucks.  

How would you have a land manager police “bikes only”?  

Better yet, how should they police “no bikes” signs blatantly ignored in provincial parks today?

Please remember that we are all ambassadors for mountain biking​. The behaviour of a single mountain biker reflects on the mountain biking community as a whole.

Nov. 17, 2020, 3:48 p.m.
Posts: 108
Joined: Oct. 17, 2012

Not saying they should "police" anyone, and yea I totally get that most of the trails are multi use, and I've never had a bad experience in 10 years here but it's just a bit dangerous on fast trails. Who would be best to contact if I wanted to send an email, would it be the DNV?

Nov. 17, 2020, 3:57 p.m.
Posts: 5
Joined: April 26, 2012

I understand the OP's sentiment, but as a rider we should always be paying attention for other users, especially those in front of us. That hiker could easily be biker with a different skill level or first time rider on a trail checking out a segment, etc. which means a marked trail designation would not solve the situation you describe.

I personally tend to follow the same etiquette I use when skiing, I am responsible for the person in front of me.

Bombing down a trail is super fun and desirable but that also increases your risk of an accident be it the result of a trail feature, stick in the spokes, tree, missed turn or other trail user. Best way to mitigate, is to be aware yourself and prepared.

So perhaps signage on trails should remind riders, hikers, users in general to be aware of other users on the trail, which they kind of do already.


 Last edited by: Sanchez321 on Nov. 17, 2020, 3:58 p.m., edited 1 time in total.
Nov. 17, 2020, 6:41 p.m.
Posts: 1590
Joined: Aug. 6, 2009

Posted by: Sanchez321

I understand the OP's sentiment, but as a rider we should always be paying attention for other users, especially those in front of us. That hiker could easily be biker with a different skill level or first time rider on a trail checking out a segment, etc. which means a marked trail designation would not solve the situation you describe.

I always cringe when I see kids hiking laps on the lower section of Empress Bypass, knowing how fast riders come ripping down that trail.


 Last edited by: PaulB on Nov. 17, 2020, 6:42 p.m., edited 1 time in total.
Nov. 17, 2020, 7:20 p.m.
Posts: 17893
Joined: Oct. 28, 2003

Posted by: seanluge

Who would be best to contact if I wanted to send an email, would it be the DNV?

depends on the specific location, or all of the land managers (see link for their contact)... Careful though, the bureaucratic response might be speed limit signage. (NSMBA, who you'd cc: is all riders, not bureaucrats if my e-sarc isn't clear)

https://nsmba.ca/contact-us/

also - - what Sanchez321 said.

Personally, one should always ride in control with enough visibility, no matter how "fast" the trail is. Trails aren't fast - riders are. My buddy in the hospital with punctured lung, broken collarbone and seven broken ribs because he ran into someone who crashed in front of him on some medium size table top dirt jumps in a field. * heal up Sealy!*

Signs, signs, everywhere there's signs...


 Last edited by: heckler on Nov. 17, 2020, 7:37 p.m., edited 3 times in total.
Nov. 18, 2020, 4:13 a.m.
Posts: 941
Joined: Nov. 6, 2006

Posted by: heckler

Posted by: seanluge

!*

Signs, signs, everywhere there's signs...

You need to brush up on your lyrics. 🤣😂🤣😂

Nov. 19, 2020, 5:43 p.m.
Posts: 17893
Joined: Oct. 28, 2003

I lie, I hope, I pray, 

I lie, I hope, I pray, 

I lie, I hope, I pray, 

But I guess that it's just not my forte

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