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Trail Magic alive and well on the Shore

May 2, 2022, 9:14 a.m.
Posts: 16
Joined: April 26, 2012

Yesterday I headed for a ride to Seymour, for the 1st time in a few months. I was on a tight timeline, had to be back in time to pick kids up from various activities as my wife was flying out for work while I was away riding. So like any rationale individual with a 3 and a bit hour window to get out for a ride, I decided to leave my car at home and ride from my East Van Hovel to the West Side of Seymour.  On the last section of Forever After I managed to taco my rear rotor and had just over an hour and half to get home. Not worrying at this point, simple solution, pull of rear wheel and bend back rotor as best I could and Bob's your uncle. 

Well No. I took off rear wheel and bent the rotor back to a manageable shape, when I ran into a road block. I couldn't for the life of me get my rear axle to thread back into frame. Ughh... For the next 30 minutes I wrestled with this and no dice. Made a couple of panicked calls to my wife who was on way to airport to reassure her I will make it home somehow and a lifeline call to a friend to see if I was missing something. While this was going on several very nice, concerned riders stopped to provide advice and support, but still no luck and mounting frustration.

I was now moving onto plan Z, which was deliberating the best way to haul ass out of trail system while carrying my bike  and getting to a suitable UBER pick up location or find an EVO (not sure I even had the fitness to make such a feat). Fortunately, as I was getting ready to hike out, a couple  riders happened by and without much question lent their assistance. Under the supervision of his friend, Jay, managed to get the axle to thread with some persistence.  

Wheel back on and game on, was able to ride out and make it back home with 15 minutes to spare to get a six pack before picking up the kids. 

With all this said, I just want to say thank you to all the riders who stopped to lend a hand (3 or 4)  and a big thanks out to Jay and his buddy who were able to make the fix and get me on my way again. These types of incidents are what helps keep the stoke for riding, whenever one gets the chance.

And Jay if I do run into you again I will make good on the beer I owe ya or other preferred beverage if beer is not your thing.

May 2, 2022, 10:32 a.m.
Posts: 304
Joined: Feb. 16, 2013

Great story and outcome! I really enjoy a good trail-side noodle, even when it has nothing to do with my equipment. A great way to exchange random conversation/anecdotes that may not have occurred otherwise.

May 2, 2022, 11:22 a.m.
Posts: 1642
Joined: Nov. 8, 2003

Well told, man glad it worked out! As a biker always on limited time and a Dad I was right at the edge of my seat there.

Somebody needs to write a novel like this. I would happily read 500 more pages of bike nerdery and drama.

May 2, 2022, 11:49 a.m.
Posts: 1224
Joined: Sept. 10, 2012

I'm glad you got some help and made it back on time. Repairs are 10x harder when the clock is ticking.

May 19, 2022, 10:45 a.m.
Posts: 16
Joined: April 26, 2012

Update for anyone that is interested. While I was replacing the rotor on my rear wheel last night, I uncovered the reason for why I had a terrible time getting my rear axle to thread back into the frame while on the trail. 

It wasn't a buggered thread or anything like that.  It turns out the replaceable derailleur hangar which the axel threads through, was loose and shifted a couple of ml's offsetting the hole the axle threads through and causing the issue. I shifted it back up and tightened and voila no issue. the movement of the hangar was so slight it took super close examination to notice it. 

I hope this helps anyone who has the same issue and saves them the hassle it cost me.

May 20, 2022, 7:19 a.m.
Posts: 901
Joined: Jan. 31, 2005

Amazing! That kind of thing used to be a feature of every ride when bikes were less reliable. Carrying tons of stuff in your Camelbak to be prepared for any eventuality. Bunch of guys standing around in the rain stroking their chins trying to figure out how to fix some weird mechanical.

May 24, 2022, 10:23 a.m.
Posts: 304
Joined: Feb. 16, 2013

Posted by: Sanchez321

It turns out the replaceable derailleur hangar which the axel threads through, was loose and shifted a couple of ml's offsetting the hole the axle threads through and causing the issue. I shifted it back up and tightened and voila no issue. the movement of the hangar was so slight it took super close examination to notice it. 

That used to happen with the Traces I had a few years back. Only one tiny screw and the 12mm axle held the hanger in place, so it could rotate a wee bit with the wheel out. I do all my own service, so found out about that little quirk before it became a trail-side annoyance. I can see how it could be a confusing situation in the heat of a trail-side repair battle.

May 25, 2022, 11:24 a.m.
Posts: 396
Joined: Aug. 10, 2012

Posted by: mammal

Posted by: Sanchez321

It turns out the replaceable derailleur hangar which the axel threads through, was loose and shifted a couple of ml's offsetting the hole the axle threads through and causing the issue. I shifted it back up and tightened and voila no issue. the movement of the hangar was so slight it took super close examination to notice it. 

That used to happen with the Traces I had a few years back. Only one tiny screw and the 12mm axle held the hanger in place, so it could rotate a wee bit with the wheel out. I do all my own service, so found out about that little quirk before it became a trail-side annoyance. I can see how it could be a confusing situation in the heat of a trail-side repair battle.

Yep....I was gonna say "must be a Trance". I never figured out the logic for such a poor design element.

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