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I've plateaued...what to do about it?

May 13, 2020, 9:12 p.m.
Posts: 625
Joined: March 15, 2013

I don't get it.

May 13, 2020, 9:40 p.m.
Posts: 5692
Joined: April 10, 2005

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ocTKTk7oExk

May 13, 2020, 10:03 p.m.
Posts: 481
Joined: May 11, 2018

That's right, Ice…Man, I am dangerous

May 17, 2020, 8:32 p.m.
Posts: 725
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017

Posted by: RAHrider

Posted by: cam@nsmb.com

I'm late to this thread but this may not have been mentioned. Tips from pro rider etc. about how to deal with a slump. 

https://nsmb.com/articles/15-tips-dump-slump/

I read that one, some of the advice seems questionable for people who have to work on Monday. For instance, One of Wade Simmons’ Tips was the following:   "Crash. That might sound funny and maybe a little painful but I find a crash is a good reset for me and I always find them a little comical – well, the ones you walk away from. You got to realize crashing is part of mountain biking and really if you’re not crashing you are pretty much in a slump all the time anyhow."

I get what he's saying but how many of those here subscribe to the philosophy that if you aren't crashing you're in a slump? I'm too old to crash and I worry about paying the bills....

i kinda get what he's saying as well, but don't necessarily agree. at a time in life, pushing hard and learning fast may very well involve a lot of this. i think Wade has probably done it all on a bike, including taking a helluva lot of chances and coming out mostly unscathed. i've seen the old videos, guy was/is immensely talented and took every risk to find the edge.  

i'm sure in a one on one conversation even he wouldn't advocate for this approach for most adults.

May 17, 2020, 10:08 p.m.
Posts: 449
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002

Posted by: JBV

...wouldn't advocate for this approach for most adults.

c’mon now this is nsmb, surely you jest?

Like you I want to keep my body complete and fully functional, but I appreciate what Wade is saying  and if you think about it crashing doesn’t have to be a warp factor 9 get off or missing the transition on a 50ft gap jump. 

You can have small consequence get-offs that test your mind without breaking your body. Things like trying to go a bit faster through a tight low speed corner can put you in the dirt and leave you laughing. You’re testing a skill set with a low consequence of error but still working on getting your brain to process that challenge and stoking the fire to get just a little bit better at the same time. 

That’s using sports psychology to its advantage.

May 20, 2020, 11:07 a.m.
Posts: 531
Joined: Jan. 31, 2005

Posted by: syncro

Posted by: JBV

...wouldn't advocate for this approach for most adults.

c’mon now this is nsmb, surely you jest?

Like you I want to keep my body complete and fully functional, but I appreciate what Wade is saying  and if you think about it crashing doesn’t have to be a warp factor 9 get off or missing the transition on a 50ft gap jump. 

You can have small consequence get-offs that test your mind without breaking your body. Things like trying to go a bit faster through a tight low speed corner can put you in the dirt and leave you laughing. You’re testing a skill set with a low consequence of error but still working on getting your brain to process that challenge and stoking the fire to get just a little bit better at the same time. 

That’s using sports psychology to its advantage.

This. 

You can be in a slump because you keep hitting the same stuff the same way. If you try new ways, say a different lean angle/weighting through a turn, or an alternate line up some tech climb, you're going to go wrong sometimes. Small tumbles might turn you on to a new way to do something, a new technique to work and boom, new skills. Learning means occasional failing, just try to keep it safe.

May 20, 2020, 11:57 a.m.
Posts: 1538
Joined: Aug. 6, 2009

...if you’re not crashing you are pretty much in a slump all the time anyhow.

I'd substitute "feeling uncomfortable" for "crashing".  It feels great when I ride through something that I'm not 100% sure I'm going to clean, rather than walking it when my spidey-sense starts to say "This is getting a bit sketchy!".  But, if it's something that 50/50 could result in a wreck, I'll walk it.  Injury recovery takes too long at my age.

On the other hand, most of my crashes have happened on relatively easy terrain, probably because I'm being complacent and not paying enough attention to everything.

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