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Accident in Seymour?

Nov. 24, 2008, 12:09 p.m.
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Joined: Aug. 4, 2003

Let's not make more to this than there is, unless we find out the full story of how and what happened, we are all just making snap judgements about this issue.

There is a go around on that stunt, so I don't see a problem with having a more difficult line on an "easier trail".

I don't see the guy who injured himself complaining about the trail or conditions on here, maybe he is a really good rider who just made a mistake, it happens all the time. You get hurt, you deal with consequences, heal and get back on the bike when you are able. Hopefully you are a little wiser for your pain.

We all need to take responsibility for our own actions.

Nov. 24, 2008, 12:13 p.m.
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Joined: Oct. 2, 2007

MTB is serious business. Heal up quick injured rider!

That's all that really needs to be siad I would say.

Nov. 24, 2008, 12:36 p.m.
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Joined: Aug. 16, 2007

Not so much to find out who or where crashed, but just to get an idea of how many times the response teams are out attending biking specific accidents. It seems that we hear more about lost hikers and skiers, and the cost of those rescues.
We all ride at our own risk, but we also have to ride responsible.

Nov. 24, 2008, 12:56 p.m.
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Joined: Aug. 4, 2003

Not so much to find out who or where crashed, but just to get an idea of how many times the response teams are out attending biking specific accidents. It seems that we hear more about lost hikers and skiers, and the cost of those rescues.
We all ride at our own risk, but we also have to ride responsible.

Lost skiers and hikers are a bigger deal media wise, because they are lost, usually overnight, or need a longer more difficult retraction from the back country.

NSS[HTML_REMOVED]R tracks all their responses, as do Fire, Ambulance and Police, so the information is somewhere.

Nov. 24, 2008, 2:02 p.m.
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Joined: Sept. 20, 2006

When I hit the drop, I pulled up and locked brakes w/front wheel in the air and rear still on the boards. Bike pitches forward stupid fast and KenN lands like a sack o potatoes.

Kn.

:lol:

I'm sorry but I couldn't help myself :)

Nov. 24, 2008, 5:39 p.m.
Posts: 13
Joined: Nov. 22, 2008

A sign might be a good idea but i think that's all that's necessary.

On a general note, people who are new to Seymour should be smart when it comes to riding trails and stunts that they don't know by being careful and check out the stunts before just "given her". I'm from Edmonton and when I first went to Seymour I took my time riding the trails, made a mental note of what to void…
Maybe he did check out the stunt before riding it… accidents do happen.

Nov. 26, 2008, 1:37 p.m.
Posts: 227
Joined: Nov. 21, 2002

A sign might be a good idea but i think that's all that's necessary.

On a general note, people who are new to Seymour should be smart when it comes to riding trails and stunts that they don't know by being careful and check out the stunts before just "given her". I'm from Edmonton and when I first went to Seymour I took my time riding the trails, made a mental note of what to void…
Maybe he did check out the stunt before riding it… accidents do happen.

Signs aren't really the answer… and as long as the feature doesn't fail while you are on it… neither is the stunt, so then in this case it is rider error.

All good stunts etc have a choke point that will indicate what is upcoming so the rider doesn't end up on something over their head. A choke point should either make you fall off before the drop where there are low consequences or else make you get off and check things out.

Nov. 26, 2008, 3:56 p.m.
Posts: 16704
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

:lol:

I'm sorry but I couldn't help myself :)

Hey, it's funny in a droll, black humour kind of way. If I spent too much time being scared of the next crash and resulting pain, I'd never ride again!

Kn.

When one person suffers from a delusion, it is called insanity.

When many people suffer from a delusion, it is called religion.

Nov. 26, 2008, 5:45 p.m.
Posts: 0
Joined: Dec. 3, 2004

I agree, but maybe there is more to this right now.

With the winter conditions, stunts and woodwork is slippery right now. Maybe checking stunts like this one, before rolling straight onto it is a good precaution. What you have to remember, we are responsible for riding within our own limits, so we each need to use our best judgement, especially when conditions aren't perfect.

To quote Stu Loewen, "Ride to ride tomorrow". I avoid woodwork around this time of year as it is unpredictable in grip and the trannies are usually soft. For me there is no need to ride crazy over the winter when the conditions are less than favorable. I know that come summer, these stunts and jumps will be there, waiting and ready for me. That is not to say that I don't ride anything over the winter, but I most definitely reduce the amount of chances that I take and I definitely spend more time assessing the stunt before I ride it. Be smart so you can enjoy the winter sports as well as ride. Healing vibes to the rider down.

Shed head!

Nov. 26, 2008, 7:13 p.m.
Posts: 565
Joined: Oct. 28, 2008

To quote Stu Loewen, "Ride to ride tomorrow". I avoid woodwork around this time of year as it is unpredictable in grip and the trannies are usually soft. For me there is no need to ride crazy over the winter when the conditions are less than favorable. I know that come summer, these stunts and jumps will be there, waiting and ready for me. That is not to say that I don't ride anything over the winter, but I most definitely reduce the amount of chances that I take and I definitely spend more time assessing the stunt before I ride it. Be smart so you can enjoy the winter sports as well as ride. Healing vibes to the rider down.

On the other hand, I am a newbie to mountain biking as an "ex" trials rider, and when my friends and I are at Seymour, we view our riding in the rain as training. I know that if I can ride roots, rocks, drops, and skinnies when the ground is saturated and the grip level is low, I will be able to fly over this stuff when the ground is dry and the grip comes back. Riding downward sloping wooden elements in the pouring rain will teach you in a hurry about the important of smoothness, modulation, and above all maximizing grip - all things that are relevant in the dry too.

I come from a car racing background and it is a common school of thought that to be a really good racer, learning to drive a "momentum" car with very little power will make you learn to truly get 11/10 out of that car where as a guy who has a high performance car with grip and power will go out and attain 9/10 but never be willing to push it hard enough to find what 11/10 is like in something with that much potential.

Coles notes: IMHO riding in the rain is the fast-track to improving your dry riding.

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Nov. 27, 2008, 11:10 a.m.
Posts: 0
Joined: Dec. 3, 2004

Quote
"That is not to say that I don't ride anything over the winter, but I most definitely reduce the amount of chances that I take and I definitely spend more time assessing the stunt before I ride it. Be smart."

Most of the points you bring up are valid to increasing your riding skills, true. However, you don't need a ramp or a 3 inch wide skinny to prove it. Try riding any trail that has any type of root exposure on it this time of year and you will gain those skills without having to hit up the skinny 20 feet down the trail. You don't need a stunt to improve those skills, and that is what I am referring to specifically. The trails on the North Shore are challenging enough in wet conditions that stunts can be omitted. Trust me, I've ridden the Cherry Bomb on Cypress when it is pissing rain, and that section of trail is waaaaaaaaay more challenging then any ladder bridge made of wood.
I have personally witnessed good riders get seriously bucked on stunts they have ridden hundreds of times before, simply because the wood is old and is just as slippery as ice when wet. Do you have to ride that slick log or greasy rolldown to make yourself a better rider? I don't think so. Keep riding in inclement weather, it'll make you a better rider for sure, but you don't have to ride a skinny to do it.

Shed head!

Nov. 27, 2008, 1:25 p.m.
Posts: 6328
Joined: Nov. 19, 2002

I challenge ANYONE to clean Bridle on a wet day! Even the new stuff!

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Nov. 28, 2008, 10:31 p.m.
Posts: 232
Joined: Oct. 30, 2005

I challenge ANYONE to clean Bridle on a wet day! Even the new stuff!

shirley, you jest

Dec. 2, 2008, 1:03 p.m.
Posts: 16
Joined: June 10, 2008

Is there any follow-up by NSMBA, or trail authority/land manager after an accident on a trail stunt? When I read that a stunt has taken a number of people out, maybe something should be done!?!

This has been a pretty contentious comment, eh?

It might be a good idea to check the crash zone for this stunt. No one wants the world covered in mattresses, but moss makes for a pretty good landing in an accident, and no one will notice the difference on the shore.

Or this could just be a waste of effort. Riding is inherently dangerous, we all know it.

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