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what's a good wax for coastal mountains and whistler

Nov. 16, 2007, 6:19 p.m.
Posts: 11204
Joined: Nov. 18, 2004

what if I just got a liquid or rub-on wax. what would I have to do then?

Throw it out and and buy some real wax. That stuff is better than nothing but its for "emergency" use (waxing a board/ski an emergency?)

Dave, I hear you're pretty wirey and agile for a dirty old man. Hey a buddy from Van is coming up to twist some throttles, you in? I swear no noght time riding this time. lol

Nov. 16, 2007, 6:39 p.m.
Posts: 7594
Joined: July 25, 2007

i'm not a racer, and i'm not even an advanced skier, and I don't see why I should be buying everything everything

Nov. 16, 2007, 11:05 p.m.
Posts: 2197
Joined: Feb. 4, 2007

If people are putting their skis outside it is probably classic grip wax. You also use an iron to iron in a binder which sticks super well to the grip zone and then the rub wax or klister you apply holds to that way longer. With grip waxes you put them outside so they set up asap…but yes glide wax you let cool inside…

Rub on waxes have a use and are fast but they are for an immediate fix. They don't moisturize the base as they just sit on top and actually come off very fast. Waste of money in my opinion. It is simple to find an old iron some yellow or warm wax from another brand a plastic scraper and one brush and your set…

Wayne when ya thinking, getting ready for winter and heading to the Baja for 2 1/2 weeks to kite surf. But the guy who is lending me his house has a 650 in the garage, oh yeah:fu:

:woot:

@davenorona

@Dave Norona

Nov. 16, 2007, 11:56 p.m.
Posts: 0
Joined: Nov. 29, 2006

Did my first wax this evening, will provide superior sliding performance in the epic lift lines tomorrow.

Nov. 17, 2007, 5:07 a.m.
Posts: 11
Joined: Nov. 20, 2005

Did my first wax this evening, will provide superior sliding performance in the epic lift lines tomorrow.

They will be!

That said, time to go wait in them!

Nov. 20, 2007, 6:43 a.m.
Posts: 3840
Joined: March 10, 2006

Skis also need to be room temp and dry before waxing. I didn't see that anywhere in here, but I may have just missed it.

As for the brushing question, the texture on the base of the skis is what assists the film of water you ride on to run down the base of the ski. If you wax without brushing you are removing the texture and will actually make you skis slower.

Jan. 2, 2008, 3:43 p.m.
Posts: 203
Joined: Nov. 14, 2006

This thread is great information for newbie waxers like myself, but I have other questions that I didn't get here…

Prior to applying ptex to the bases, should the skis be cleaned? If yes, with what? and should I "deburr" the bases before dripping ptex into the gouges?

And when grinding the edges, I noticed that MEC sells kits that hold the stones at either 88deg or 90deg. I know that 88 is sharper, but dulls faster and 90deg is duller, but last longer. so really, I'm guessing that 90deg is good enough for a non-performance skier like myself, anyone care to comment on this?

thanks…

Jan. 3, 2008, 7:13 a.m.
Posts: 3840
Joined: March 10, 2006

The avergae skier will never notice the difference between 88 and 90 degrees. Having smooth clean edges will make a bigger difference for most than edge angle. That said if you keep your skis in good condition and maintain them regularly, an 88 is a better choice for performance.

I am definitely not an expert on petex, since coming from a racing background damaged skis were not used for anything other than rock skiing. The base needs to be wax free, but I have never been a fan of using wax remover on a base. I would rather ski off the wax and then just make sure the base is clean and dry.

Depending on the scope of the damage you might be better off either leaving the gouge, or getting a proper base repair done. As said above, texture is the most important part of the base. Petex is essentially textureless no matter how hard you try. Thus it really behave like a brake. Unless a lot of core is showing, I would generally leave it.

Jan. 3, 2008, 8:33 a.m.
Posts: 5225
Joined: July 22, 2003

Skis also need to be room temp and dry before waxing. I didn't see that anywhere in here, but I may have just missed it.

As for the brushing question, the texture on the base of the skis is what assists the film of water you ride on to run down the base of the ski. If you wax without brushing you are removing the texture and will actually make you skis slower.

brushing is pointless unless you're racing.

a quick couples laps down the hill on your fresh wax will achieve the exact result as brushing by hand.

brushing only affects the wax on top of the base, not the base itself.

you are correct in the rest though. if the skis don't cool at room temp (e.g. outside) the wax won't stay in the base properly. it's also easier to scrape skis when they're warmer.

Jan. 3, 2008, 8:52 a.m.
Posts: 14378
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

Prior to applying ptex to the bases, should the skis be cleaned? If yes, with what? and should I "deburr" the bases before dripping ptex into the gouges?

QUOTE]

I wouldnt use any petex repair you light [HTML_REMOVED] drip cuz it has wax in it to keep the candle liitwhich means the repair will wear out ,mine never lasted longer than a doz days.I use a pure petex reapir string that you melt in with a solderijng iron …lasts forever

I dig out any crap in the repair area but I don't sweat it , the hot ptex will float out whatever is in there

I don't use base cleaner except to clean tops [HTML_REMOVED] sides of skis … you can just wax and scrape while hot

Jan. 3, 2008, 9:20 a.m.
Posts: 3840
Joined: March 10, 2006

brushing is pointless unless you're racing.

a quick couples laps down the hill on your fresh wax will achieve the exact result as brushing by hand.

brushing only affects the wax on top of the base, not the base itself.

you are correct in the rest though. if the skis don't cool at room temp (e.g. outside) the wax won't stay in the base properly. it's also easier to scrape skis when they're warmer.

This is incorrect. If you don't brush your skis they will be without texture until the wax wears off, and even still the wax will remain longer in the bases textured grooves, creating a essentially flat surface unable to effectively channel water. Obviously a faster base is more important in racing, but simply skiing will not recreate the same base structure.

Furthermore using a hard brush does affect and clean the base structure. Especially if you do base repair, this is the only way to add structure to the new base.

Take a quick read of the KUU tuning manual here under structure and brushes.

http://www.kuu.com/how2tune.htm

Jan. 3, 2008, 10:59 a.m.
Posts: 5225
Joined: July 22, 2003

dude unless you race, a quick slap of wax and scape is sufficient.

i used to xc ski race and geek out on this shit but it's kinda pointless unless you race.

IMNSHO …

Jan. 3, 2008, 11:07 a.m.
Posts: 8935
Joined: Dec. 23, 2005

dude unless you race, a quick slap of wax and scape is sufficient.

i used to xc ski race and geek out on this shit but it's kinda pointless unless you race.

IMNSHO …

bingo.

I don't even bother to scrape anymore. Just means less mess to clean up. Waxing in the living room of our one bedroom apartment ain't the best.

Jan. 3, 2008, 11:26 a.m.
Posts: 5225
Joined: July 22, 2003

bingo.

I don't even bother to scrape anymore. Just means less mess to clean up. Waxing in the living room of our one bedroom apartment ain't the best.

im not that lazy yet … but it sounds good.

like how many runs does it take to ski them clean of wax?

Jan. 3, 2008, 11:59 a.m.
Posts: 11827
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

wax in the spring then put em away, scrape em in the fall.

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