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Wax

Nov. 19, 2015, 9:40 p.m.
Posts: 11003
Joined: June 4, 2008

What are you using these days? I've been getting a block of Hertel wax every year but it doesn't work in the wet shit we've been getting the last few years… that said, I wonder if anything works in those conditions.

Nov. 19, 2015, 9:57 p.m.
Posts: 5731
Joined: June 24, 2003

Swix yellow high Fluoro is quite good for wet. I use it on my nord skis too. Skis fly. For wet snow the base needs structure and you need to scrape well and then brush the base to get the wax out of the structure. The structure is to break up the suction from wet snow. I had some Karhu skate skis once upon a time that were former team skis. They had micro grooves the length of the base to break suction. Some folks don't think wax matters that much. Well, last year I bought used skier cross skis from a national team skier. They were in superb condition. For the first time, ever, in skiing with my wife, I caught and passed her on Burned Stew piste at Whistler. We've skied together for 29 years. She skiied on the Nation Team briefly. Boy was she pissed. It was the wax and base prep that let me go fast.

Debate? Bikes are made for riding not pushing.

Nov. 19, 2015, 10:02 p.m.
Posts: 11003
Joined: June 4, 2008

This stuff?

There's other yellow Swix stuff but they want my left testicle for a shot glass sized square…

Nov. 20, 2015, 7:21 a.m.
Posts: 494
Joined: Dec. 29, 2006

or this..

hydrocarbon wax will be a little bit slower but not very noticeable and the fumes from hydrocarbon wont give you cancer as fast. base structure will make the biggest difference but you will get good results by keeping the iron moving over base so the wax stays fluid and get deep into the base then let it cool fully then scrape and get pretty aggressive with a nylon brush or use a brass brush. on the coast i use straight yellow wax or mix a little pink with yellow.

Nov. 20, 2015, 7:37 a.m.
Posts: 5731
Joined: June 24, 2003

This stuff?

There's other yellow Swix stuff but they want my left testicle for a shot glass sized square…

Yeah. That's what I have. Someone was staying with us a couple years ago and she had this on the wax bench so I used it. Was impressed.

Debate? Bikes are made for riding not pushing.

Nov. 20, 2015, 7:38 a.m.
Posts: 494
Joined: Dec. 29, 2006

There's other yellow Swix stuff but they want my left testicle for a shot glass sized square…

its gone cost you more then one nut if you really want to go fast.
http://www.racewax.com/p-674-swix-cera-f-100-fluoro-powder-ski-race-wax-fc8x-fc08x-warm-30g.aspx

Nov. 20, 2015, 8:49 a.m.
Posts: 0
Joined: Aug. 4, 2003

For wet conditions, the structure in your base is more important than the wax. Of course the right wax is still an issue, you will need the yellow wax from any of the big brands, Toko, Holmenkol or Swix, but the Fluoro is probably overkill for just regular skiing.

A proper stone grind will make the biggest difference, for the best speed, or consistent glide, the structure is still on the skis after the wax is gone, that is why it is important. You also need to brush the structure properly after waxing, to allow it to be open and do its job.

Nov. 20, 2015, 10:02 a.m.
Posts: 14378
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

that montana saphir stone grinder in whistler is an amazing machine, I had some concave BD's that were a bit evil in their handling traits … perfect skis in 10 min

I watch the over the hill DH skiers prep for the annual shussboomer race up at HBM and they take EVERY bit of wax off with the bases with a rotary brush

I don't sweat the day to day waxing I just try to make sure my wax is good for a temp lower than what I am skiing

Nov. 20, 2015, 11:35 a.m.
Posts: 6449
Joined: Nov. 19, 2002

I use a dish scrubbie to buff off excess after waxing, seems to help keep that suction at bay and provides a scary fast base..what do the nsmb experts say about that? Always done it, but some people look at me funny when I tell me that

Nov. 20, 2015, 3:20 p.m.
Posts: 1487
Joined: July 11, 2014

that montana saphir stone grinder in whistler is an amazing machine, I had some concave BD's that were a bit evil in their handling traits … perfect skis in 10 min

What shop has that machine in Whistler? Is it Profile? I've taken a few pairs of skis there over the years although I get 99% of my work done by Crystal Glide in North Van, those guys do stellar work.

I just use cheap pink and yellow Kuu wax blocks from MEC depending on the temperature, haven't ever bothered throwing green on. I use a combo nylon/brass brush after scraping and call it good. I used to wax constantly the first few years after I quit racing but can't be arsed anymore, probably only do it 2-3 times a year per pair of skis now. I am happy as long as I glide well enough on the flats and my friends aren't passing me. The most annoying thing is waxing a pair of skis and using glue skins on them shortly after which seems to strip em dry.

Nov. 20, 2015, 3:35 p.m.
Posts: 8935
Joined: Dec. 23, 2005

For wet conditions, the structure in your base is more important than the wax. Of course the right wax is still an issue, you will need the yellow wax from any of the big brands, Toko, Holmenkol or Swix, but the Fluoro is probably overkill for just regular skiing.

A proper stone grind will make the biggest difference, for the best speed, or consistent glide, the structure is still on the skis after the wax is gone, that is why it is important. You also need to brush the structure properly after waxing, to allow it to be open and do its job.

The Tonestar has it. Good structure is where it's at.

Nov. 20, 2015, 3:43 p.m.
Posts: 14378
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

What shop has that machine in Whistler? ..

5 yrs ago it was creekside next to that sushi place, the guys in the shop forgot to do
my skis twice, so not the sharpest knives in the drawer but once they remembered to feed them in the machine [HTML_REMOVED] press the button … fucking awesume job

Nov. 20, 2015, 3:56 p.m.
Posts: 494
Joined: Dec. 29, 2006

I use a dish scrubbie to buff off excess after waxing, seems to help keep that suction at bay and provides a scary fast base..what do the nsmb experts say about that? Always done it, but some people look at me funny when I tell me that

i use one before waxing to clean off the base and take any oxide off the edges.

Nov. 20, 2015, 5:23 p.m.
Posts: 351
Joined: March 4, 2013

i think you're better off to wax frequently with cheap wax (i.e. well before you ever get the white oxidation on bases) than to wax once in a while with good wax. at least that has been my experience with xc skis.

the high-end race wax was also hit or miss, in some conditions the cheap stuff will be just as good (we used to glide test different waxes prior to races). also with the way temps change around here you might often be way off, i think getting the right ballpark is most important?

as for brushing, it helps, but on DH skis i don't see a huge deal as the snow will accomplish that in a couple runs? on xc skis it makes a lot of sense though

some random thoughts.

Nov. 20, 2015, 5:29 p.m.
Posts: 1123
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002

Swix yellow high Fluoro is quite good for wet. I use it on my nord skis too. Skis fly. For wet snow the base needs structure and you need to scrape well and then brush the base to get the wax out of the structure. The structure is to break up the suction from wet snow. I had some Karhu skate skis once upon a time that were former team skis. They had micro grooves the length of the base to break suction. Some folks don't think wax matters that much. Well, last year I bought used skier cross skis from a national team skier. They were in superb condition. For the first time, ever, in skiing with my wife, I caught and passed her on Burned Stew piste at Whistler. We've skied together for 29 years. She skiied on the Nation Team briefly. Boy was she pissed. It was the wax and base prep that let me go fast.

so did you let her in on the secret to your newfound speed or say that it your new training routine seems to be paying off?

context is everything

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