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Working in the USA...

Feb. 18, 2013, 10:41 p.m.
Posts: 16818
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

I'm sure human resources will supply me with everything I need to know if this goes through, but in the random bouncing that seems to be my career these days it appears as though I'm staring a transfer to the Dakota's in the face.

Norf Dakota? Well shit, that's right next to Montana!! With all those US states being about as big as two postage stamps - hell, you could be neighbours with Farmer!

Oh shit, you could just move on in and be roommates with the guy. I hear that his girlfriends eventually get super bored with all his prattling on about guns and ammo and the second 'mendment and on and on. So, there's that …

And then there's what he does with those guns. I mean, talk about "pork barrel politics" … I never imagined! Well, his girlfriend DID say a .22 is all he really needs.

Kn.

When one person suffers from a delusion, it is called insanity.

When many people suffer from a delusion, it is called religion.

Feb. 19, 2013, 8:36 a.m.
Posts: 7657
Joined: Feb. 15, 2005

http://www.frostfireskiarea.com/

Here's where you'll get to ski. I went there once, the runs are over pretty quick! It's more a social time than anything.

Ha - they celebrate Louis Riel day! Nice!

I have 21,474,850 rep points...

My blog - read it!

http://www.citizenclass.ca

Feb. 19, 2013, 8:42 a.m.
Posts: 15971
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

Can't emphasize that ^^^ advice enough.

Moving part way through the year can bring unexpected taxes if you're not careful:

Its not a big deal for federal taxes because tax treaties ensure you don't get bent over too badly. But there are no treaties between states and provinces. So, you will pay both state and provincial income tax on whatever you earned in Canada, and neither will give you credit for what you paid to the other

thats the cost of power my friend

Feb. 19, 2013, 4:40 p.m.
Posts: 2285
Joined: Feb. 5, 2005

Go-t moving the Land of the Free. Isn't that sort of like if I were to marry a freedom hating liberal?

Can't emphasize that ^^^ advice enough.

Moving part way through the year can bring unexpected taxes if you're not careful:

If you reside in the US for [HTML_REMOVED]183 days they will deem you to be a resident for the whole year. The state you move to will probably do the same. This means you pay US federal and state income tax on both your US and Canadian earnings for the entire year. Canada will also deem you to be a resident for the time you worked in Canada, as will your province - and you will have to pay Canadian/provincial taxes on this income.

Its not a big deal for federal taxes because tax treaties ensure you don't get bent over too badly. But there are no treaties between states and provinces. So, you will pay both state and provincial income tax on whatever you earned in Canada, and neither will give you credit for what you paid to the other. Ask me how I know all this…!

Canada is a little more into pro-rating so I don't think it's as bad if you reside in Canada for over half the year. But I think if you are a US resident for less than half the year you may lose your tax deductions, which can be a big deal.

And also important to note, even if you move to the US but maintain ties to Canada, the CRA can come back years later and deem you to be a Canadian resident for the whole time, and assess taxes, penalties and interest on what you earned in the US while away. So its important to cut ties to Canada (get rid of bank accounts, memberships, cell phones, cars you won't take with you, etc - having wife/kids remain in Canada is a definite tie). There is info on CRA's website about this and you can send them info to get an advance ruling on your situation before you go - highly recommended.

Like ceebee said, get professional advice because there are some complex rules you're dealing with here. And, make sure your employer gets you a green card. That way if you decide to stay, you have no issues doing so. A lot of other visas are tied to a specific employer.

This is good advice. One other thing I would suggest is getting residency in your state asap (drivers license). Turns out there is also a form that the CRA wants you to fill out when you leave Canada. You are supposed to do it before you leave, and that is how they determine if you have enough ties to Canada to be taxed as a resident of Canada. I didn't know this (guess I should have done it when I moved on my student visa) but I did it when I started work, by which point I was already a MT resident. That actually helped me because even though I closed all Canadian bank accounts, credit cards, owned no property, no vehicles registered in Canada, didn't have a wife or kids, and had spent most of the last 2 years in the US, the CRA still figured that I had enough ties to Canada to be taxed. Fortunately, as a resident of a country that Canada has a tax treaty with, they will consider me a non-resident anyways.

On the other hand, since you hate America so much, I'm guessing that you probably aren't welcome. :usa:

That's the problem with cities, they're refuges for the weak, the fish that didn't evolve.

I don't want to google this - sounds like a thing that NSMB will be better at.

Feb. 19, 2013, 10:08 p.m.
Posts: 3202
Joined: Aug. 4, 2009

Go-t moving the Land of the Free. Isn't that sort of like if I were to marry a freedom hating liberal?.

On the other hand, since you hate America so much, I'm guessing that you probably aren't welcome. :usa:

Thanks for the advice all (including farmer - that's quite valuable.) If I get this I'll only have a few weeks to prepare and move, so I want to be sure I know what to do on my own end of things. Sounds like clearing my credit card should be priority one (is anyway, for more obvious reasons). Do you folks know if my autos (truck/quad) are transferable down there with the loans (minimal, but still there) on them, or should I pay them out first and just off them in Canada and start fresh?

Also… to address the 'murica hate: I can act/chameleon for a year or two, and if I find a nice place away from people I can probably even do it for longer… if I get this the next logical step is Denver, Houston, or Calgary and I'd be just fine with any of them.

Feb. 19, 2013, 10:27 p.m.
Posts: 0
Joined: Feb. 2, 2005

Thanks for the advice all (including farmer - that's quite valuable.) If I get this I'll only have a few weeks to prepare and move, so I want to be sure I know what to do on my own end of things. Sounds like clearing my credit card should be priority one (is anyway, for more obvious reasons). Do you folks know if my autos (truck/quad) are transferable down there with the loans (minimal, but still there) on them, or should I pay them out first and just off them in Canada and start fresh?

Also… to address the 'murica hate: I can act/chameleon for a year or two, and if I find a nice place away from people I can probably even do it for longer… if I get this the next logical step is Denver, Houston, or Calgary and I'd be just fine with any of them.

Keep your Canadian CC's, you will have zero credit down south (as I learned the other coming
up here). That means you have no credit for a cell phone, gas, electric or rent. Have cash
ready and/or get a prepaid CC. I had/have about as good of credit as you can get in the
states, but that meant shit when I got here. Didn't take too long to get my credit up here
but it was a bit of a shock not having any credit for the first time in 20+ years.

I don't think you'll really notice to many differences. There are just as many rednecks
up here as there are down there, only difference is what flag they fly. Music's the same
the trucks are the same, the clothes are the same etc, maybe just a bit less polite and more
"real". I find there's good and bad people everywhere you go.

Farmer's right in filling out that form (forgot the number). My wife didn't do it for 18 yrs
she lived in Hawaii with me, and didn't file the whole time. There was no issue till she
moved back and she had to file. Turned out BC has reciprocal agreements with Hawaii (and many other
state) so I think all told she paid less than $100 in the end (like $10 + 90 in interest).

Haters goin to hate, enjoy your adventure!

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"i surf because, i"m always a better person when i come in"-Andy Irons
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Feb. 19, 2013, 10:41 p.m.
Posts: 15758
Joined: May 29, 2004

when you go,can you take gran torino and kenN with you?

Pastor of Muppets

Feb. 20, 2013, 1:14 a.m.
Posts: 286
Joined: July 22, 2010

Keep your Canadian CC's, you will have zero credit down south (as I learned the other coming
up here). That means you have no credit for a cell phone, gas, electric or rent. Have cash
ready and/or get a prepaid CC. I had/have about as good of credit as you can get in the
states, but that meant shit when I got here. Didn't take too long to get my credit up here
but it was a bit of a shock not having any credit for the first time in 20+ years…

This is good advice. I'm living in the UK right now (as a non-Canadian resident) and although we had to prove our ties were cut with Canada for tax purposes we still own a house in Canada and still have our Canadian bank accounts. How we proved that our ties were cut is that the house is rented and looked after by a property manager so we can't just come back to it at any time. And the bank accounts we leave alone unless doing business in Canada or travelling outside of the UK. If you ever plan to come back to Canada it's probably worth keeping at least one account/CC, even if it's nearly empty and never used.

I'm not sure if it's different with the US compared to Britain (since we're still part of the Commonwealth and all that) but that has been our experience and everything has seemed to work out from a tax perspective and otherwise.

Also, if you have investments etc, you may have to pay a 'departure tax' on your capital gains when you leave. I can't remember all the specifics now as it's been awhile, but something else to consider/look into.

And we had the same credit problem here. It seemed pretty crazy to have to start from zero again, and we had a hell of a time trying to get a credit card here.

Good luck with everything, and just hope you're doing it for the right reasons…

Feb. 20, 2013, 8:18 a.m.
Posts: 3447
Joined: Dec. 2, 2002

Thanks for the advice all (including farmer - that's quite valuable.) If I get this I'll only have a few weeks to prepare and move, so I want to be sure I know what to do on my own end of things. Sounds like clearing my credit card should be priority one (is anyway, for more obvious reasons). Do you folks know if my autos (truck/quad) are transferable down there with the loans (minimal, but still there) on them, or should I pay them out first and just off them in Canada and start fresh?

Also… to address the 'murica hate: I can act/chameleon for a year or two, and if I find a nice place away from people I can probably even do it for longer… if I get this the next logical step is Denver, Houston, or Calgary and I'd be just fine with any of them.

You could always hang out with me in Denver, thats a huge plus.

jake has come through for me before, I fully suspect he is just trying to find all his clothes and finishing up breakfast

Feb. 20, 2013, 12:26 p.m.
Posts: 3202
Joined: Aug. 4, 2009

You could always hang out with me in Denver, thats a huge plus.

Real, serious question: What's life in Denver like? Is "AMURICA WE LOVE BUTTER, GUNS AND FREEDOM" at least hidden on the sidelines of the city?

Feb. 20, 2013, 12:31 p.m.
Posts: 16818
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

Rumour has it that Austin is pretty much the opposite of the rest of Texas, and generally very pleasant and progressive.

Plus, Austin City Limits is one of the coolest concert series evah.

Kn.

When one person suffers from a delusion, it is called insanity.

When many people suffer from a delusion, it is called religion.

Feb. 20, 2013, 12:45 p.m.
Posts: 3202
Joined: Aug. 4, 2009

Rumour has it that Austin is pretty much the opposite of the rest of Texas, and generally very pleasant and progressive.

Plus, Austin City Limits is one of the coolest concert series evah.

Kn.

As such, the oil corp that I work for has no properties there.

Feb. 20, 2013, 1:43 p.m.
Posts: 8256
Joined: Nov. 21, 2002

i think they pronounce it like 'ol' down yonder

WTB Frequency i23 rim, 650b NEW - $40

Feb. 20, 2013, 1:54 p.m.
Posts: 16818
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

i think they pronounce it like 'ol' down yonder

Dat's NASCAR talk!

Mah tars wuz flat end mah ole wuz leekin!

Kn.

When one person suffers from a delusion, it is called insanity.

When many people suffer from a delusion, it is called religion.

Feb. 20, 2013, 2:31 p.m.
Posts: 3202
Joined: Aug. 4, 2009

Dat's NASCAR talk!

Mah tars wuz flat end mah ole wuz leekin!

Kn.

Ae man, I can' really insolt the way Americans talk. After oll, oop 'ere in Canada we've got oor way of speaking, if you know what I'm talkin aboot eh?

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