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Working in Alberta

Jan. 30, 2013, 6:49 p.m.
Posts: 569
Joined: Feb. 14, 2006

Good conversation here boys. Nor really a drilling rig question per say but how long do you guys think the oil construction boom is going to go on in Alberta. I am thinking of moving to Calgary in the next couple of years after my GF is out of school.

Jan. 30, 2013, 7:05 p.m.
Posts: 298
Joined: Oct. 23, 2003

Ive been thinking bout it a lot. I really can't see an impending slow down when it comes to oil extraction. Youve got more people than ever before all demanding the product. Curious as to what nsmb says bout it as well

Ha Ha! Made you look.

Jan. 30, 2013, 8:09 p.m.
Posts: 33648
Joined: Nov. 19, 2002

If you're young, do it for a bit and save your money. Then pick what you want to do and where. Maybe you'll like it there. Maybe you'll want to go back to where you lived before. Thing to remember is that it's a lot easier digging ditches in the cold rainy weather when you're 25 as compared to 60.

It is easy to dodge our responsibilities, but we cannot dodge the consequences of dodging our responsibilities.
- Josiah Stamp

Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race.
- H.G. Wells

Jan. 30, 2013, 9:32 p.m.
Posts: 3202
Joined: Aug. 4, 2009

There are approved construction projects that will be demanding labor for the next 30-40 years.

If you want the biggest bucks in industrial construction, Ft. Mac, Fox Creek, and Grande Prairie are your destinations. If you want the biggest bucks in residential construction, Red Deer, Edmonton, Calgary, Estevan, and Medicine Hat are where you want to hang your hat.

There are several facets to the industry - your best bet is to find yourself working in extraction or processing in Ft. Mac - the capital outlay there won't allow the digging to stop in the foreseeable future. Drilling can be turned off like a light switch, stay close to the mines or close to the wellhead and you'll build a stable career - there are very few of us who land full time gigs with drilling contractors, it takes a lot of strong networking and good luck.

Jan. 30, 2013, 9:40 p.m.
Posts: 4885
Joined: July 9, 2004

The only way I would go to camp or shift work..

Ya that's my two year goal. Just got my Steamfitting ticket, applying for my blue seal, then I'm shooting for mechanical planning and eventually coordinating/execution managing.

Good conversation here boys. Nor really a drilling rig question per say but how long do you guys think the oil construction boom is going to go on in Alberta. I am thinking of moving to Calgary in the next couple of years after my GF is out of school.

That's the million dollar question. If I knew I wouldn't have to work anymore.

If you're young, do it for a bit and save your money. Then pick what you want to do and where. Maybe you'll like it there. Maybe you'll want to go back to where you lived before. Thing to remember is that it's a lot easier digging ditches in the cold rainy weather when you're 25 as compared to 60.

Power engineers don't dig ditches. In fact they don't do much physical work compared to the trades. They learn their system, control it, turn a few valves but any of the maintenance work is done by a trades person.

There are approved construction projects that will be demanding labor for the next 30-40 years.

If you want the biggest bucks in industrial construction, Ft. Mac, Fox Creek, and Grande Prairie are your destinations. If you want the biggest bucks in residential construction, Red Deer, Edmonton, Calgary, Estevan, and Medicine Hat are where you want to hang your hat.

There are several facets to the industry - your best bet is to find yourself working in extraction or processing in Ft. Mac - the capital outlay there won't allow the digging to stop in the foreseeable future. Drilling can be turned off like a light switch, stay close to the mines or close to the wellhead and you'll build a stable career - there are very few of us who land full time gigs with drilling contractors, it takes a lot of strong networking and good luck.

Definitely the truth here. The capital outlay on the extraction facilities is enormous so it makes little sense to shut off completly. Regula Maintenance and shutdowns will always be needed and generally provide lots of hours. New construction is a but hit and miss, they will literally shelve a project overnight- but once she's built and running they don't ever want to shut it off.

Jan. 30, 2013, 9:42 p.m.
Posts: 4885
Joined: July 9, 2004

Good conversation here boys. Nor really a drilling rig question per say but how long do you guys think the oil construction boom is going to go on in Alberta. I am thinking of moving to Calgary in the next couple of years after my GF is out of school.

Looking at your profile pic it looks like your a welder?

If you got your b pressure your laughing and will never want for work. If anything you'll probably be dying to get out of welding lol!

Jan. 30, 2013, 9:55 p.m.
Posts: 41
Joined: Aug. 6, 2004

what about the cost to ones soul? how does that factor in?

Have to quote the man here on this.

Also this.

Do you really want to be a further part of this?

Or be the change…

Jan. 30, 2013, 9:59 p.m.
Posts: 41
Joined: Aug. 6, 2004

And before anyone replies.

I sit large at 168,000 km on a peddle bike.

that's 4 times around our planet and more than 1/2 to the moon.

Jan. 30, 2013, 10 p.m.
Posts: 1181
Joined: March 5, 2009

Have to quote the man here on this.

Also this.

Do you really want to be a further part of this?

Or be the change…

So who is at fault for our current state of affairs? Is it the people working to supply a product which is at high demand, or is it the spoiled westerners living our plush, north american lives?

Those working in oil and gas are merely working to meet the demand of our society. If you want to change anything, get researching [HTML_REMOVED] lobbying the government for subsidies in green technology.

Bicycles!

Jan. 30, 2013, 10:02 p.m.
Posts: 41
Joined: Aug. 6, 2004

So who is at fault for our current state of affairs? Is it the people working to supply a product which is at high demand, or is it the spoiled westerners living our plush, north american lives?

Those working in oil and gas are merely working to meet the demand of our society. If you want to change anything, get researching [HTML_REMOVED] lobbying the government for subsidies in green technology.

Excuse…

"if we don't supply then someone else does" attitude.

Jan. 30, 2013, 10:04 p.m.
Posts: 41
Joined: Aug. 6, 2004

So who is at fault for our current state of affairs? Is it the people working to supply a product which is at high demand, or is it the spoiled westerners living our plush, north american lives?

Those working in oil and gas are merely working to meet the demand of our society. If you want to change anything, get researching [HTML_REMOVED] lobbying the government for subsidies in green technology.

Researching is what I have been doing. and Lobbying is what I am doing.

Jan. 30, 2013, 10:07 p.m.
Posts: 1181
Joined: March 5, 2009

Excuse…

"if we don't supply then someone else does" attitude.

Not an excuse. I make no apologies for my lifestyle.

Do you hunt and gather your own food, or do you buy it in a store? Is it local? Even if it is local, I bet there were plenty of fossil fuels expended to bring it to your table. Where did your bike come from? Was it made in Asia and shipped to you here? How about the buildings you live in, streets you ride on, etc…

Biking is a great start, but the only thing that will truly help is new technology. (or having a global population a fraction of its current level)

Bicycles!

Jan. 30, 2013, 10:19 p.m.
Posts: 41
Joined: Aug. 6, 2004

Not an excuse. I make no apologies for my lifestyle.

Do you hunt and gather your own food, or do you buy it in a store? Is it local? Even if it is local, I bet there were plenty of fossil fuels expended to bring it to your table. Where did your bike come from? Was it made in Asia and shipped to you here? How about the buildings you live in, streets you ride on, etc…

Biking is a great start, but the only thing that will truly help is new technology. (or having a global population a fraction of its current level)

Your response is a an excuse. You attack when faced with a mirror.

The Technology is already right now. 10 or so major Heliostat sodium paste solar power plants that are a closed loop system would power the entire planet. 20+ Tera watts.

These systems are 100% clean and not under pressure. combine that with Geo-Thermal Storage of the Sodium paste which can be heated to 1000C with a 98% percent efficiency will run 24/7 even in darkness when put in the right places. Canada has such places for this now.

I would much rather be working to polish the mirrors of such a system than doing harm to our ecosystem.

Jan. 30, 2013, 10:21 p.m.
Posts: 1181
Joined: March 5, 2009

Your response is a an excuse. You attack when faced with a mirror.

The Technology is already right now. 10 or so major Heliostat sodium paste solar power plants that are a closed loop system would power the entire planet. 20+ Tera watts.

These systems are 100% clean and not under pressure. combine that with Geo-Thermal Storage of the Sodium paste which can be heated to 1000C with a 98% percent efficiency will run 24/7 even in darkness when put in the right places. Canada has such places for this now.

I would much rather be working to polish the mirrors of such a system than doing harm to our ecosystem.

Cool! I'll have to read into them!

I really don't see what excuses I was making for myself. I don't work in the oil and gas sector.

Bicycles!

Jan. 30, 2013, 10:41 p.m.
Posts: 7967
Joined: March 8, 2006

You just build shitty highways, haha

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