New posts

Uber

March 26, 2018, 9:39 a.m.
Posts: 1422
Joined: May 23, 2006

A 65-year-old New York City cab driver from Queens, Nicanor Ochisor, hanged himself in his garage March 16, saying in a note he left behind that the ride-hailing companies Uber and Lyft had made it impossible for him to make a living. It was the fourth suicide by a cab driver in New York in the last four months, including one Feb. 5 in which livery driver Douglas Schifter, 61, killed himself with a shotgun outside City Hall.

Ochisor, a Romanian immigrant, owned a New York City taxi medallion. (Medallions were once coveted by cab drivers because having them allowed the drivers to own their own cabs or lease the cabs to other drivers.) Ochisor drove the night shift, lasting 10 to 12 hours. His wife drove the day shift. But after Uber and Lyft flooded the city with cars and underpaid drivers about three years ago, the couple could barely meet expenses. Ochisor’s home was about to go into foreclosure. His medallion, once worth $1.1 million, had plummeted in value to $180,000.* The dramatic drop in the value of the medallion, which he had hoped to lease for $3,000 a month or sell to finance his retirement, wiped out his economic security. He faced financial ruin and poverty. And he was not alone.

Corporate capitalism is establishing a neofeudal serfdom in numerous occupations, a condition in which there are no labor laws, no minimum wage, no benefits, no job security and no regulations. Desperate and impoverished workers, forced to endure 16-hour days, are viciously pitted against each other. Uber drivers make about $13.25 an hour. In cities like Detroit this falls to $8.77. Travis Kalanick, the former CEO of Uber and one of the founders, has a net worth of $4.8 billion. Logan Green, the CEO of Lyft, has a net worth of $300 million.

https://www.truthdig.com/articles/the-gig-economy-is-the-new-term-for-serfdom/

* This, obviously, is why Vancouver's taxi industry is fighting the entry of Uber/Lyft

Just three years ago, taxi licences in Vancouver were worth $800,000 to $1 million, largely due to the restricted supply. Those prices essentially guaranteed drivers’s investment in a cab and a job. They are heavily underpinned by home and business mortgages.

But now, as in many cities where Uber has targeted its ride-hailing app, Vancouver’s taxi licence system is in disarray.

“There are at least 100 licences on offer for sale. But there is no value at all at the moment,” said Kulwant Sahota, the president of Yellow Cab, the largest of Vancouver’s four taxi companies. “There is no certainty happening here. People are scared.”

http://www.vancouversun.com/news/even+before+uber+arrives+taxi+industry+disarray/11755601/story.html

“.....with a malevolent fascist swine atop its titular apex, the pitiful wounded beast of a rotten, spiritually dead American Superpower is careening towards epic barbarism while pushing the species dangerously to the tipping points of extinction.”


 Last edited by: tungsten on March 26, 2018, 9:57 a.m., edited 1 time in total.
March 26, 2018, 10:43 a.m.
Posts: 1108
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002

Posted by: tungsten

Just three years ago, taxi licences in Vancouver were worth $800,000 to $1 million, largely due to the restricted supply.

Some people might call that a cartel. 

I don't think the cab industry is going to get a lot of sympathy considering their relationship with politicians and the purposeful limitation of cab licenses. I know you drive and are fighting for your livelihood, but your fighting for a system that's been broken for a long time. All sorts of things in life change and one needs to be able to recognize that and adapt or risk being made obsolete. Burying one's head in the sand in the hopes that things won't change and one will get to keep their comfortable existence is sure fire way of getting run over.

March 26, 2018, 2:33 p.m.
Posts: 5486
Joined: April 10, 2005

The only constant is change. If you're not changing & improving with the times, you are falling behind. That is just the facts. Sometimes life is not fair. Deal with it. Sad to say sometimes, but that's the way it is. Maybe dude should not have put all his eggs in one basket, but that is easy for me to say.

March 26, 2018, 2:40 p.m.
Posts: 1485
Joined: July 11, 2014

Why the hell is a taxi license worth $1M? That is an absurd valuation based on the cash flow or any other metric. Glad to hear the secondary market is freezing up in the lower mainland, only a matter of time.

Doesn't look like we will get Uber/Lyft in 2018 here. Pathetic.

March 26, 2018, 3:53 p.m.
Posts: 16121
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

Posted by: syncro

Some people might call that a cartel. 

I don't think the cab industry is going to get a lot of sympathy considering their relationship with politicians and the purposeful limitation of cab licenses. I know you drive and are fighting for your livelihood, but your "YOU'RE" fighting for a system that's been broken for a long time. All sorts of things in life change and one needs to be able to recognize that and adapt or risk being made obsolete. Burying one's head in the sand in the hopes that things won't change and one will get to keep their comfortable existence is sure fire way of getting run over.

Oh come now, the taxi industry has been highly adaptive to change.

They have an app now ....

March 26, 2018, 8:09 p.m.
Posts: 1422
Joined: May 23, 2006

Posted by: syncro

I know you drive.....

.....a transit bus. I got no dog in this fight other than to point out our devolution towards a new feudalism.

But go for it dude. Drive them all into poverty for your own selfish interests. What goes around comes around.

Why the hell is a taxi license worth $1M? That is an absurd valuation based on the cash flow or any other metric.

Around 1981 or so the city decided they needed more taxis and ran a lottery. Winners could purchase a license for about $17,000 as I recall. Street value at that time was about double.

Typically two people will share a license, splitting it into day/night shift each responsible for finding drivers to cover the car the days/nights they aren't driving.

Or, the owner(s) could put the car in the fleet and just collect the residuals, and work a real job.

I drove nights Mon. - Fri. After $175 lease/$50-60 gaz I'd make $225/275 on Fridays. But I had to work Mon. -Thurs. to get the car when my take home Mon./Tues. could be as little as $40. 40 fuckin' $ for 10-11hrs work after gaz and $60 lease.

When they added extra cars (about 50(?) city wide) for Fri. night my take went down about 20%.

Adding Uber to this dynamic is why taxi drivers are hanging themselves.

I think you're all a buncha' racists actually. What if all those drivers were white? What then? You think the drivers back in the old days, when I was driving, were angels?


 Last edited by: tungsten on March 26, 2018, 10:29 p.m., edited 5 times in total.
March 27, 2018, 1:24 p.m.
Posts: 12676
Joined: Nov. 24, 2002

Racism? Really? Oh come on.

March 27, 2018, 1:56 p.m.
Posts: 34321
Joined: Nov. 19, 2002

He's always pulling the race card when he doesn't have a leg to stand on.

It is easy to dodge our responsibilities, but we cannot dodge the consequences of dodging our responsibilities.
- Josiah Stamp

Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race.
- H.G. Wells

March 27, 2018, 1:58 p.m.
Posts: 16121
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

Posted by: switch

He's always pulling the race card when he doesn't have a leg to stand on.

Next thing you know, he'll be pulling the disabled card.

March 27, 2018, 3:13 p.m.
Posts: 14378
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

There have been stories that none of the uber drivers can make enough money to make it worth their while and none of them are licensed

March 27, 2018, 3:18 p.m.
Posts: 5486
Joined: April 10, 2005

Posted by: switch

He's always pulling the race card when he doesn't have a leg to stand on.

That happens a lot when the person in question is losing the argument.

March 27, 2018, 6:57 p.m.
Posts: 14676
Joined: Dec. 30, 2002

Posted by: Stuminator

Posted by: switch

He's always pulling the race card when he doesn't have a leg to stand on.

That happens a lot when the person in question is losing the argument.

I do believe this sums it up.

March 27, 2018, 7:08 p.m.
Posts: 14676
Joined: Dec. 30, 2002

Posted by: tungsten

Posted by: syncro

I know you drive.....

.....a transit bus. I got no dog in this fight other than to point out our devolution towards a new feudalism.

But go for it dude. Drive them all into poverty for your own selfish interests. What goes around comes around.

Why the hell is a taxi license worth $1M? That is an absurd valuation based on the cash flow or any other metric.

Around 1981 or so the city decided they needed more taxis and ran a lottery. Winners could purchase a license for about $17,000 as I recall. Street value at that time was about double.

Typically two people will share a license, splitting it into day/night shift each responsible for finding drivers to cover the car the days/nights they aren't driving.

Or, the owner(s) could put the car in the fleet and just collect the residuals, and work a real job.

I drove nights Mon. - Fri. After $175 lease/$50-60 gaz I'd make $225/275 on Fridays. But I had to work Mon. -Thurs. to get the car when my take home Mon./Tues. could be as little as $40. 40 fuckin' $ for 10-11hrs work after gaz and $60 lease.

When they added extra cars (about 50(?) city wide) for Fri. night my take went down about 20%.

Adding Uber to this dynamic is why taxi drivers are hanging themselves.

I think you're all a buncha' racists actually. What if all those drivers were white? What then? You think the drivers back in the old days, when I was driving, were angels?

Calling the basics of supply and demand racist is ignorant at best. Are you aware how long some people wait for a cab - only to find it out that driver doesnt want to cross a bridge or two? Just because there's a good chance they wont get a fare back into Vancouver.

Any one know how the Aerocar drivers feel about Uber?

March 28, 2018, 11:42 a.m.
Posts: 832
Joined: March 18, 2017

My cab showed up the next AM last time I ordered one.

March 28, 2018, 3:16 p.m.
Posts: 4
Joined: March 11, 2007

I feel for their situation but it's one they've created. Catching a cab downtown can be difficult to say the least. I've been turned down by cabbies for not having cash and for living too far away.... I've never lived East of Nanaimo St. By limiting the number of licenses they've created the demand for a secondary service provider. When that provider appeared they tried to fight them instead of trying to stay ahead of them. Creating a decent hailing app can't be that hard.

Forum jump: