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Trinity Western- Religious Freedom vs Human Rights

June 12, 2014, 2:19 p.m.
Posts: 1729
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002

well you did say "any and all."

so you just want to exclude faith based schools and???

Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity ~ Seneca

June 12, 2014, 2:34 p.m.
Posts: 16695
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

You failed to understand, mate.

Yes … any and all private schools should be cut off from public funding.

Special need schools should not be private, and should be fully funded, as should all public schools. However, if someone wants to start up a private school for "special needs" kids, then why should the taxpayer fund it, if the public system provides adequate services for special needs kids?

When one person suffers from a delusion, it is called insanity.

When many people suffer from a delusion, it is called religion.

June 12, 2014, 2:35 p.m.
Posts: 33664
Joined: Nov. 19, 2002

But as we've seen in this thread, you most certainly can. Here's a transcript of the LSUC doing such a thing on this very topic.

Comment starting near bottom of page 33 is pretty good.

It is easy to dodge our responsibilities, but we cannot dodge the consequences of dodging our responsibilities.
- Josiah Stamp

Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race.
- H.G. Wells

June 12, 2014, 2:42 p.m.
Posts: 16695
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RdgIe_9WUHA

When one person suffers from a delusion, it is called insanity.

When many people suffer from a delusion, it is called religion.

June 12, 2014, 2:45 p.m.
Posts: 1729
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002

You failed to understand, mate.

Yes … any and all private schools should be cut off from public funding.

Special need schools should not be private, and should be fully funded, as should all public schools. However, if someone wants to start up a private school for "special needs" kids, then why should the taxpayer fund it, if the public system provides adequate services for special needs kids?

good for you for clarifying your position, but it doesn't really work in the reality of the current public school system.

Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity ~ Seneca

June 12, 2014, 2:49 p.m.
Posts: 16695
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

good for you for clarifying your position, but it doesn't really work in the reality of the current public school system.

And that brings us full circle, to the first post I made in the BCTF thread:

Gee whiz. Two decades of ever-increasing tax cuts, and we're surprised that we can't fund the things most important to us. Health care, education and senior's care.

Go figure.

:rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

When one person suffers from a delusion, it is called insanity.

When many people suffer from a delusion, it is called religion.

June 12, 2014, 2:56 p.m.
Posts: 1729
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002

and that relates to twu's law school???

Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity ~ Seneca

June 12, 2014, 3:05 p.m.
Posts: 33664
Joined: Nov. 19, 2002

PRIVATE school, no public funding. If they want to make up some code of conduct, or require a dress code, that's their right.

It is easy to dodge our responsibilities, but we cannot dodge the consequences of dodging our responsibilities.
- Josiah Stamp

Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race.
- H.G. Wells

June 12, 2014, 3:07 p.m.
Posts: 26382
Joined: Aug. 14, 2005

You failed to understand, mate.

Yes … any and all private schools should be cut off from public funding.

Special need schools should not be private, and should be fully funded, as should all public schools. However, if someone wants to start up a private school for "special needs" kids, then why should the taxpayer fund it, if the public system provides adequate services for special needs kids?

And do you think the average school board does enough to help those special needs kids? And before you answer…think carefully about this. You are a dad with a kid not of school age yet and may one day be in need of those services. Keep in mind you have not dealt with the special needs system to date nor been through it.

www.thisiswhy.co.uk

www.teamnfi.blogspot.com/

June 12, 2014, 3:09 p.m.
Posts: 7707
Joined: Sept. 11, 2003

and just to follow that line of thinking you feel that independent schools that specialize in teaching kids with special needs such as: http://www.gleneden.org/ should lose all government funding?

i know, i know, sample of one. so here's a list of a few more:

http://www.ourkids.net/special-needs-schools-bc.php

The government could fund such schools 100%, but they would be woefully underfunded for their purpose and probably be more like the "benevolent institutions" of old.

It is actually remarkable how many higher-functioning people with special needs can now live independent, productive lives with many options instead of being housed, fed and clothed as "basket cases" by the government or by charity as in times past.

BTW, there will likely be a coming demographic of "special needs" - the mental special needs of the millions of adults with dementia whose bodies have outlived their minds and physical disability of those with chronic illness from unhealthy lifestyles.

June 12, 2014, 3:22 p.m.
Posts: 16695
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

PRIVATE school, no public funding. If they want to make up some code of conduct, or require a dress code, that's their right.

Only insofar as it doesn't conflict with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

When one person suffers from a delusion, it is called insanity.

When many people suffer from a delusion, it is called religion.

June 12, 2014, 3:30 p.m.
Posts: 26382
Joined: Aug. 14, 2005

The government could fund such schools 100%, but they would be woefully underfunded for their purpose and probably be more like the "benevolent institutions" of old.

It is actually remarkable how many higher-functioning people with special needs can now live independent, productive lives with many options instead of being housed, fed and clothed as "basket cases" by the government or by charity as in times past.

.

Only problem I have with private schools specifically the boarding type where the students live there for weeks at a time. Which I think can and is to easily abused by parents who's children have a hard time in school simply ship them off to these places and think money will make them better. It provides an easy out to those parents by spending money and make themselves think they helped their child.

Out of sight out of mind kind of deal. But this is more of an issue of idiot parents then it is the school.

www.thisiswhy.co.uk

www.teamnfi.blogspot.com/

June 12, 2014, 4:23 p.m.
Posts: 3
Joined: Sept. 27, 2005

Well, the guv should be funding such services to the point that they're not private.

and that being said, are you then prepared to pay more taxes to support the proposed increase in service delivery (I am btw…) One has to be concerned though that the opportunity for corruption within our government only increases with the more money that they take in and the more services that they over-see.

A fully transparent government with open access to all political decision processes would somewhat address this concern of corruption - but thats for another thread.

I'm ignoring Smedley.

June 12, 2014, 4:30 p.m.
Posts: 26382
Joined: Aug. 14, 2005

Since no one has asked….

KenN….did you attend an actual private school? If so what institution? For confirmation purposes of course.

I ask this because based on your record of previous posts in regards to anything related to religion and overall hostility towards this. And just wonder if this is clouding your judgement in the arena.

And just to be transparent….I have a understanding of private schools and how much they can screw up an individual. And have a level of hostility towards RLA being the specific institution.

www.thisiswhy.co.uk

www.teamnfi.blogspot.com/

June 12, 2014, 6:16 p.m.
Posts: 2055
Joined: April 25, 2003

PRIVATE school, no public funding. If they want to make up some code of conduct, or require a dress code, that's their right.

They have a right to have a code of conduct, even a discriminatory one (apparently).

They don't have a right to accreditation. They have to earn that. Seems that being discriminatory on the basis of a characteristic that is specifically protected by the laws that lawyers are responsible to uphold may disqualify them from accreditation. I can't say I'm surprised.

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