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The Decline of Vancouver.

Feb. 9, 2017, 1:21 p.m.
Posts: 12655
Joined: Nov. 24, 2002

Just really curious, how has the riding in Vancouver changed when compared to 2007/2009?

"You don't learn from experience. You learn from reflecting on the experience."
- Kristen Ulmer

Feb. 9, 2017, 1:28 p.m.
Posts: 16082
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

Just really curious, how has the riding in Vancouver changed when compared to 2007/2009?

Nothing but enduro bro shit now …. show up with 26 inch wheels at your peril.

When one person suffers from a delusion, it is called insanity.

When many people suffer from a delusion, it is called religion.

Feb. 9, 2017, 1:39 p.m.
Posts: 4827
Joined: Nov. 25, 2002

Just really curious, how has the riding in Vancouver changed when compared to 2007/2009?

a few more buff trails, a few less janky. more sustainable trailwork. certainly more traffic, but it's still pretty easy to find solitude. the general character lives on, just matured a bit.

Feb. 9, 2017, 4:22 p.m.
Posts: 15019
Joined: April 5, 2007

Nothing but enduro bro shit now …. show up with 26 inch wheels at your peril.

:lol:

Why slag free swag?:rolleyes:

ummm, as your doctor i recommend against riding with a scaphoid fracture.

Feb. 9, 2017, 5:35 p.m.
Posts: 2110
Joined: Aug. 28, 2006

A friend of mine bought a 2 bdrm condo In East Van about 7 months ago for $570k. The unit across the hall, which is smaller and not as nice, just listed for $650. Another 2 bdrm down the hall, which was a bit bigger and nicer, was listed for $750k and sold for $808k in a week or so. My friend's agent told him he could easily pocket $100k if he wanted to flip it. In 7 months. He said that while houses have cooled slightly, the condo market is insane.

Feb. 9, 2017, 5:54 p.m.
Posts: 944
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002

A friend of mine bought a 2 bdrm condo In East Van about 7 months ago for $570k. The unit across the hall, which is smaller and not as nice, just listed for $650. Another 2 bdrm down the hall, which was a bit bigger and nicer, was listed for $750k and sold for $808k in a week or so. My friend's agent told him he could easily pocket $100k if he wanted to flip it. In 7 months. He said that while houses have cooled slightly, the condo market is insane.

$800K for a 2bed in east van?!?!?

where?

context is everything

Feb. 9, 2017, 6:05 p.m.
Posts: 2110
Joined: Aug. 28, 2006

$800K for a 2bed in east van?!?!?

where?

14th and Main. Old building too, although it is renovated and well maintained. East side seems to be up around $800+/sq. ft. these days.

http://www.rew.ca/properties/R2135066/418-4550-fraser-street-vancouver-bc?property_click=map

Wasnt very long ago, units in this building could be had in the $600/ sq. ft. range

Feb. 9, 2017, 6:43 p.m.
Posts: 3
Joined: July 4, 2003

When you talk about density - are you referring to density just inside the downtown peninsula or in Vancouver as a whole? IMO the downtown peninsula is very dense but the rest of Vancouver isn't dense at all. If you drive 5 mins outside of downtown you have nothing but single family homes on decent sized lots. That's the area they need to make more dense… knock down everything west of Main Street and replace it with townhouses and low-rise apartment buildings.

Vancouver doubled down on a all or nothing zoning policy.

You have transit related clusters of very high density land designated for high rise - this will never be affordable, the land costs will always go up lockstep with FSR allowed on site, and construction costs will continue to go up as codes becomes ever more complex, and material costs increase.

You are left with 80% of Vancouver being single family homes. Even though these aren't truly single family anymore, since most are suited, this is far, far from highest and best use.

The solution was to allow reasonable spot rezoning and much more infill.

Examples of this would have been;

- Turn hundredths of corner lots into 3 dwellings
- With this; allow taller structures to allow ground level parking, under units
- Allow row homes
- Allow laneway homes (before 2008 )
- Allow smaller homes

Key here is, do none of the above in broad strokes - allow developers and builders to apply with ideas. This eliminates speculators front running, land hoarding, and driving up costs. Fine example being the Cambie corridor.

All of above, combined with 3-4 story mid rise buildings could easily alleviate the housing crunch we are in, and go a massive way towards reducing traffic and congestion in the whole region.

That being said - all the above is pie in the sky, chances are slim to none of any of it happening since it would require we upend municipal and provincial politics.

Feb. 9, 2017, 7:06 p.m.
Posts: 944
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002

Vancouver doubled down on a all or nothing zoning policy.

You have transit related clusters of very high density land designated for high rise - this will never be affordable, the land costs will always go up lockstep with FSR allowed on site, and construction costs will continue to go up as codes becomes ever more complex, and material costs increase.

You are left with 80% of Vancouver being single family homes. Even though these aren't truly single family anymore, since most are suited, this is far, far from highest and best use.

The solution was to allow reasonable spot rezoning and much more infill.

Examples of this would have been;

- Turn hundredths of corner lots into 3 dwellings
- With this; allow taller structures to allow ground level parking, under units
- Allow row homes
- Allow laneway homes (before 2008 )
- Allow smaller homes

Key here is, do none of the above in broad strokes - allow developers and builders to apply with ideas. This eliminates speculators front running, land hoarding, and driving up costs. Fine example being the Cambie corridor.

All of above, combined with 3-4 story mid rise buildings could easily alleviate the housing crunch we are in, and go a massive way towards reducing traffic and congestion in the whole region.

That being said - all the above is pie in the sky, chances are slim to none of any of it happening since it would require we upend municipal and provincial politics.

a perfect example of this was the marine gardens redevelopment from a few years ago. the city needs to be zoning for more of that type of development as rentals and not allowing rental stock to be rezoned and turned over to condos for sale.

context is everything

Feb. 9, 2017, 7:12 p.m.
Posts: 0
Joined: Dec. 27, 2002

Uninformed hipsters love to buy 800k condos. RE only goes up!

Feb. 9, 2017, 7:27 p.m.
Posts: 26384
Joined: Aug. 14, 2005

So, how has the current weather effected Vancouver real estate?

www.thisiswhy.co.uk

www.teamnfi.blogspot.com/

Feb. 9, 2017, 9:05 p.m.
Posts: 7707
Joined: Sept. 11, 2003

In 7 months. He said that while houses have cooled slightly, the condo market is insane.

The house market has cooled because detached homes are priced out of reach of all but the relatively wealthy. Condos are going up because people are willing to pay whatever it takes to get a foothold - any kind of a foothold - in the housing market before condos become unaffordable to the middle class as well. Christy Clark's grand scheme to enrich herself and her inner-circle is going according to plan. In fact, its going so well, that she is no longer having to extract cash payments (ie "donations") from the Liberal Party of BC on top of her salary as premier.

Feb. 10, 2017, 11:41 a.m.
Posts: 3801
Joined: April 13, 2003

Vancouver doubled down on a all or nothing zoning policy.

You have transit related clusters of very high density land designated for high rise - this will never be affordable, the land costs will always go up lockstep with FSR allowed on site, and construction costs will continue to go up as codes becomes ever more complex, and material costs increase.

You are left with 80% of Vancouver being single family homes. Even though these aren't truly single family anymore, since most are suited, this is far, far from highest and best use.

The solution was to allow reasonable spot rezoning and much more infill.

Examples of this would have been;

- Turn hundredths of corner lots into 3 dwellings
- With this; allow taller structures to allow ground level parking, under units
- Allow row homes
- Allow laneway homes (before 2008 )
- Allow smaller homes

Key here is, do none of the above in broad strokes - allow developers and builders to apply with ideas. This eliminates speculators front running, land hoarding, and driving up costs. Fine example being the Cambie corridor.

All of above, combined with 3-4 story mid rise buildings could easily alleviate the housing crunch we are in, and go a massive way towards reducing traffic and congestion in the whole region.

That being said - all the above is pie in the sky, chances are slim to none of any of it happening since it would require we upend municipal and provincial politics.

so with this increased density who is going to pay for the increased infrastructure? Sure the hell isn't the developers.

:canada:

Feb. 10, 2017, 11:45 a.m.
Posts: 1232
Joined: May 23, 2006

14th and Main.

Sorry nit-picking but that's Mt.Pleasant, not east van.

In fact, its going so well, that she is no longer having to extract cash payments (ie "donations") from the Liberal Party of BC on top of her salary as premier.

Four more years.

“.....with a malevolent fascist swine atop its titular apex, the pitiful wounded beast of a rotten, spiritually dead American Superpower is careening towards epic barbarism while pushing the species dangerously to the tipping points of extinction.”

Feb. 10, 2017, 12:29 p.m.
Posts: 6
Joined: Jan. 12, 2006

I still think Vancouver's excessive reliance on basement suites and laneway houses is stupid. It basically privatises the supply of affordable housing. You can't sell a suite or a laneway house separately to the main property, so all these policies do is allow existing homeowners to collect money from those who have been shut out of the housing market.

Yes, cities need rental housing, but Vancouver's high rental prices are partly driven by people that are stuck renting because they've been shut out of the market. Tear down large 4 bedroom houses on large lots and build row houses for freehold sale to address the lack of starter family homes.

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