New posts

The Critical Thinking Thread

Sept. 15, 2021, 7:24 p.m.
Posts: 1729
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002

From time to time some good things get posted here in regards to critical thinking and philosophy. I thought it might be cool to have some of that content congregated in one place. 

So the first thing to share is a fallacy quiz from the School of Thought website. I think this should be relatively easy for most of us here, especially if you're at all familiar with common logical fallacies. That said, unfortunately I expect KenN may struggle more than the rest of us with it so we should all give him some encouragement. 

https://www.schoolofthought.org/critical-thinking-quiz

Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity ~ Seneca

Sept. 15, 2021, 7:40 p.m.
Posts: 11911
Joined: June 4, 2008

That's pretty good.  Shame it's only 10 questions.

Sept. 15, 2021, 9:06 p.m.
Posts: 15557
Joined: May 29, 2004

Maybe pirates do prevent global warming.. .

Sept. 16, 2021, 10:54 p.m.
Posts: 15446
Joined: Dec. 30, 2002

Posted by: three-sheets

Maybe pirates do prevent global warming.. .

Depends how many cannons they have I suppose.

Sept. 16, 2021, 11:43 p.m.
Posts: 26
Joined: July 24, 2013

What I don't like is that it's easy to discredit everything based on these "fallacies."  Limits critical thinking imo.  I passed 10/10 and I don't really know/understand all the definitions of fallacies or care to.  "Science" is the new normal and can't be denied...right?

Sept. 17, 2021, 7:38 a.m.
Posts: 1253
Joined: Nov. 6, 2006

Right

Sept. 17, 2021, 8:11 a.m.
Posts: 1729
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002

Posted by: thefishtailbites

What I don't like is that it's easy to discredit everything based on these "fallacies." Limits critical thinking imo. I passed 10/10 and I don't really know/understand all the definitions of fallacies or care to. "Science" is the new normal and can't be denied...right?

I guess congrats on getting all of them right even if you're not sure of all the definitions. However, it's not "easy to discredit everything based on these fallacies." Fallacies are tests, or basically truth statements, and have strict definitions even though some of them may have weird names. Like a light switch they're on or off, so a fallacy will only discredit something if it's incorrect. Fallacies don't limit critical thinking, but they are an integral part of it and help define the boundaries. Without any rules and checks, critical thinking would be nothing more than unsupported opinion where anyone could claim anything. I think where some confusion can happen with fallacies is they sometimes get applied incorrectly or people misunderstand their use. That page above has lots of good info on fallacies and the rules of critical thinking and it's worth taking some time to check it out imo.

Re science, it's not the new normal and it can be denied if done or applied incorrectly. Like fallacies and critical thinking, science has a general set of rules to be followed and some branches of types of science might have specific rules. One thing that guides science is the scientific method. You sometimes might see it described/defined in slightly different ways, but it follows a pattern of observe, question, hypothesize, test, analyze, and most importantly reproduce/retest. Good science is reproduceable, meaning different people can do the same testing and get the same results as the original experiment.

Edit: We all use critical thinking and fallicies, often in an informal way, in our lives every day. Everytime you question something you're using critical thinking to asses how true or accurate something may be.


 Last edited by: syncro on Sept. 17, 2021, 8:12 a.m., edited 1 time in total.
Sept. 19, 2021, 10:20 a.m.
Posts: 62
Joined: March 12, 2021

Posted by: thefishtailbites

What I don't like is that it's easy to discredit everything based on these "fallacies."  Limits critical thinking imo.  I passed 10/10 and I don't really know/understand all the definitions of fallacies or care to.  "Science" is the new normal and can't be denied...right?

Being able to spot a fallacy when one is used does help with critical thinking.  Being able to identify that fallacy by name and call it out helps make some people feel superior when they are arguing on the internet.  The first thing is obviously way more important than the second thing.

Sept. 19, 2021, 4:53 p.m.
Posts: 26
Joined: July 24, 2013

Good posts above and I do agree.  From watching recent politics (leader's debate etc) there are a lot of fallacies used to (not) answer questions.  I think I will brush up on them.

Sept. 19, 2021, 5:24 p.m.
Posts: 1729
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002

lol - watching politicians talk is the perfect way to spot fallacies

Sept. 19, 2021, 7:03 p.m.
Posts: 11911
Joined: June 4, 2008

Posted by: thefishtailbites

What I don't like is that it's easy to discredit everything based on these "fallacies."  Limits critical thinking imo.  I passed 10/10 and I don't really know/understand all the definitions of fallacies or care to.  "Science" is the new normal and can't be denied...right?

Behavioral Psychology is a very real field of scientific endeavor. So much so, one of the early disciples from the likes of Kahneman is a Nobel laureate for economics.  (Assuming you believe psychology in of itself is useless).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Thaler

Sept. 20, 2021, 11:10 a.m.
Posts: 74
Joined: Feb. 2, 2021

Posted by: thefishtailbites

What I don't like is that it's easy to discredit everything based on these "fallacies."  Limits critical thinking imo.  I passed 10/10 and I don't really know/understand all the definitions of fallacies or care to.  "Science" is the new normal and can't be denied...right?

Fallacies do not limit critical thinking, they are an ESSENTIAL part of it. Critical thinking requires self-regulation, which is the practice of examining and correcting errors in your thinking, fallacies are just 'errors in our thinking' that are so common, we've given them specific names.

Even if you've come to the 'right' conclusion, but you've done so through fallacious reasoning, it's sort of like getting the correct answer on a math test, but when you show your work, your methodology is wrong and you've essentially stumbled onto the correct result.

Sept. 21, 2021, 8:01 p.m.
Posts: 1477
Joined: Nov. 8, 2003

Posted by: Schnickelfritz

Posted by: thefishtailbites

What I don't like is that it's easy to discredit everything based on these "fallacies."  Limits critical thinking imo.  I passed 10/10 and I don't really know/understand all the definitions of fallacies or care to.  "Science" is the new normal and can't be denied...right?

Fallacies do not limit critical thinking, they are an ESSENTIAL part of it. Critical thinking requires self-regulation, which is the practice of examining and correcting errors in your thinking, fallacies are just 'errors in our thinking' that are so common, we've given them specific names.

Even if you've come to the 'right' conclusion, but you've done so through fallacious reasoning, it's sort of like getting the correct answer on a math test, but when you show your work, your methodology is wrong and you've essentially stumbled onto the correct result.

Actually, exactly like math. In university I got a math credit for a logic class. 🍺

It was fascinating turning dialogue into a page of mathematical formulas.

Oct. 14, 2021, 11:10 a.m.
Posts: 1729
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002

Kinda cool and related TED vid about turning your life over to an algorithm that randomly picks everything you do.

https://www.ted.com/talks/max_hawkins_i_let_algorithms_randomize_my_life_for_two_years

Nov. 23, 2021, 7:54 p.m.
Posts: 1729
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002

Free will - yay or nay?

https://philosophybreak.com/articles/free-will-illusion-sam-harris/

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2016/06/theres-no-such-thing-as-free-will/480750/


 Last edited by: syncro on Nov. 23, 2021, 8:05 p.m., edited 1 time in total.

Forum jump: