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Small trucks

Jan. 5, 2014, 8:45 a.m.
Posts: 2285
Joined: Feb. 5, 2005

right so enbridge basicly has been saying "this is what we are gona do and its the safest thing ever" and then a year later they say "now this is what we are gona do and its the safest thing ever" … wait a minute wasn't what you offered a year ago the safest thing?

So now you complain that they went back to the drawing board and improved their design?

One of my favorite quotes (which I sadly cannot remember the source, and I am paraphrasing here) is, "The most terrifying moment in my engineering career was when I realized that everything around me was designed by people as lost as I am."

Enbridge has a group of fairly smart people who are all human, who drank, partied, and fucked their way through 4 years of college. At the end, someone gave them a piece of paper that says others will listen to plans they draw up. They continued to draw up plans until they started to get a good idea of what works and what doesn't.

In the end, someone has to draw up the design based on the best they know, and present it to a group of their superiors who improve / change it with the best they know. Then, in a fairly short amount of time, it is presented to the board, who is told it is the best they can come up with and is economically viable. They vote to go for it, and suddenly some 23 year old's design is being presented to the world.

Give it a few years. Maybe technology has improved. Maybe half way through a 12 pack a new idea was drawn on the back of a napkin. Maybe someone went to a conference and saw an exciting new idea. There are a thousand maybes as to why that smart group of people wanted to change something, but in the end it is probably done because it is a good idea.

Yet this get vilified? What if they had stuck with their original design and a few years down the road something happens and you find out that in fact, they wanted to change it but they had already presented plan A (which is actually about plan T by the time it goes through the gauntlet), and some bleeding heart would be worried that they changed their plans.

That's the problem with cities, they're refuges for the weak, the fish that didn't evolve.

I don't want to google this - sounds like a thing that NSMB will be better at.

Jan. 5, 2014, 8:50 a.m.
Posts: 14458
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

RIP the Small Trucks thread.

The small truck IS actualy dead in NA and the reason is nobody bought them

if you can stop thinking and feeling how wonderful a small diesel truck would be long enough to goggle some sales figures you could see for yourslef that small truck sales peaked [HTML_REMOVED] 10 years ago … no mfger can make/sell what nobody wants to buy for very long

the pipeline thing is right on track and VERY far from done

Jan. 5, 2014, 8:58 a.m.
Posts: 14458
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

So now you complain that they went back to the drawing board and improved their design?

One of my favorite quotes (which I sadly cannot remember the source, and I am paraphrasing here) is, "The most terrifying moment in my engineering career was when I realized that everything around me was designed by people as lost as I am."

Enbridge has a group of fairly smart people who are all human, who drank, partied, and fucked their way through 4 years of college. At the end, someone gave them a piece of paper that says others will listen to plans they draw up. They continued to draw up plans until they started to get a good idea of what works and what doesn't.

In the end, someone has to draw up the design based on the best they know, and present it to a group of their superiors who improve / change it with the best they know. Then, in a fairly short amount of time, it is presented to the board, who is told it is the best they can come up with and is economically viable. They vote to go for it, and suddenly some 23 year old's design is being presented to the world.

Give it a few years. Maybe technology has improved. Maybe half way through a 12 pack a new idea was drawn on the back of a napkin. Maybe someone went to a conference and saw an exciting new idea. There are a thousand maybes as to why that smart group of people wanted to change something, but in the end it is probably done because it is a good idea.

Yet this get vilified? What if they had stuck with their original design and a few years down the road something happens and you find out that in fact, they wanted to change it but they had already presented plan A (which is actually about plan T by the time it goes through the gauntlet), and some bleeding heart would be worried that they changed their plans.

so it was all just a bunch of frat boys getting smarter or staying sober long enough to be smarter … not money/harper paying off his bro's

and in that case ^^ isnt that the human error part we gotta worry about?

you are uncharacteristically coherent and measured in your response today talking about being a fucked up engineer as opposed to being one today … slow saturday night?

Jan. 5, 2014, 9:37 a.m.
Posts: 2285
Joined: Feb. 5, 2005

Your comment about changing design is a pet peeve of mine. Basically goes back to the difference between science and religion. In science, we change our theories to match all of the fact that we have at a given time. As new facts become available, the theory evolves. In religion, once you pull an idea out of your ass, you stick with it regardless of facts and evidence.

I should add that in the case of engineering design, just because we move on from plan A to plan B, it doesn't mean that plan A was wrong or a bad idea. Some aspects of A may still be better than B, but based on what we are able to determine, B appears to be the better course of action. Plan A may have worked perfectly fine, been highly profitable, and had no real problems.

That's the problem with cities, they're refuges for the weak, the fish that didn't evolve.

I don't want to google this - sounds like a thing that NSMB will be better at.

Jan. 5, 2014, 9:52 a.m.
Posts: 14458
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

well I do believe the earth is way older than 6000 yrs old and while I will give you that the bible IS a best seller … I couldn't get into it

but your point on tech changes is all assuming you aren't just a bunch of giggling nerds sitting around drinking beer while you argue about the square root of pi

that you do actualy DO set policy?

so while you have a good point any changes to the enbridge proposal I will argue are brought about by the usual which are greed, money and politics …not technological change

Jan. 5, 2014, 10:23 a.m.
Posts: 2285
Joined: Feb. 5, 2005

Let me give you an example from a current project I am working on.

When it comes to secondary escapeways underground, our standard for years has been a steel tube with a ladder inside of it. I have better than 700' of this style of ladder planned in our development drifting, and included in the costs which have been approved by the board. Out of the blue I get a phone call from an Australian company just coming into the US, who offers a similar product, but made out of plastic. Rather than a contractor with a specialized machine, it can be installed by a couple of miners and a winch. Meets all of the legislated safety requirements, and allows the escapeway to be installed faster, thereby providing our miners with a second means of escape sooner. It may require slight changes to my raise design, which as I have stated, isn't a big deal and happens regularly. Now that the holidays are over, I expect to see a quote shortly. If the cost is better, I will likely change my design. My motives are driven my cost and ease of installation. Is there something wrong with that?

As a professor of mine once said, anyone can build a bridge. You hire an engineer to avoid two possible outcomes. 1) They build it 30 times, and after 29 collapsed bridges one finally stands up. 2) They overbuild it to the extreme and waste all sorts of money in the process.

If you want #2 (which is what many are calling for), I could design it right now as a quadruple walled stainless steel pipeline with an impenetrable unobtanium coating 24" thick on each of the four walls, with gate valves every 5 feet designed to shut if there is a pressure drop anywhere along the line, cameras between the walls in case the sensors fail, and a massive secondary containment tank around the whole thing. Guess what? Now the project is uneconomic and none of you see a god damned red cent. An engineer with training and experience in this can build one just as safe for a fraction the cost.

Now excuse me while I memorize the Fibonacci sequence over a few beers.

That's the problem with cities, they're refuges for the weak, the fish that didn't evolve.

I don't want to google this - sounds like a thing that NSMB will be better at.

Jan. 5, 2014, 6:51 p.m.
Posts: 17787
Joined: Oct. 28, 2003

small trucks. This one rocks.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=olczQaI0xow

Jan. 5, 2014, 7:27 p.m.
Posts: 12194
Joined: Nov. 19, 2002

^ I thought you were reppin' the Zuki for a sec…they made a neat truck, very rare in NA

https://www.google.ca/search?q=suzuki+samurai+pickup[HTML_REMOVED]source=lnms[HTML_REMOVED]tbm=isch[HTML_REMOVED]sa=X[HTML_REMOVED]ei=fyDKUveIGNL4oATrp4KgAg[HTML_REMOVED]sqi=2[HTML_REMOVED]ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ[HTML_REMOVED]biw=1510[HTML_REMOVED]bih=766

Jan. 5, 2014, 7:30 p.m.
Posts: 57
Joined: Oct. 23, 2003

^ I thought you were reppin' the Zuki for a sec…they made a neat truck, very rare in NA

https://www.google.ca/search?q=suzuki+samurai+pickup[HTML_REMOVED]source=lnms[HTML_REMOVED]tbm=isch[HTML_REMOVED]sa=X[HTML_REMOVED]ei=fyDKUveIGNL4oATrp4KgAg[HTML_REMOVED]sqi=2[HTML_REMOVED]ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ[HTML_REMOVED]biw=1510[HTML_REMOVED]bih=766

super rare! I've only ever seen 2.

Ha Ha! Made you look.

Jan. 6, 2014, 12:51 p.m.
Posts: 15019
Joined: April 5, 2007

Anyone else with a 2nd Gen Frontier/Xterra have the SES light come on after filling up with Shell 87, yet have it turn off after filling up with Shell 89?

Stock engine w/Volant Cool Air Intake.

Have had the fuel sending unit replaced on warranty a few years back

Im thinking IMS, and a chip, 33s, and a lift should solve the problem:P

Why slag free swag?:rolleyes:

ummm, as your doctor i recommend against riding with a scaphoid fracture.

Jan. 6, 2014, 1:18 p.m.
Posts: 1521
Joined: Nov. 21, 2002

Anyone else with a 2nd Gen Frontier/Xterra have the SES light come on after filling up with Shell 87, yet have it turn off after filling up with Shell 89?

Stock engine w/Volant Cool Air Intake.

Have had the fuel sending unit replaced on warranty a few years back

Im thinking IMS, and a chip, 33s, and a lift should solve the problem:P

If it came off right after you filled up, it could be that you didn't put your cap on right, that'll throw the SES light and it will clear a day or two after you fix it (ie: the next time you filled up).

My SES light (06 Xterra) also comes on due to a design flaw on the evaporative canister valve - it gets clogged with dust when you drive on gravel roads. It's not a critical problem, there are some DIY fixes if you google the problem, but I just clear the code and it's all good until the next time I drive on gravel.

Way back from the old school days of NSMB…

Jan. 6, 2014, 2:59 p.m.
Posts: 394
Joined: Feb. 25, 2003

I could design it right now as a quadruple walled stainless steel pipeline with an impenetrable unobtanium coating 24" thick on each of the four walls, with gate valves every 5 feet designed to shut if there is a pressure drop anywhere along the line, cameras between the walls in case the sensors fail, and a massive secondary containment tank around the whole thing. Guess what? Now the project is uneconomic and none of you see a god damned red cent. An engineer with training and experience in this can build one just as safe for a fraction the cost.

This is a fair point. But it's really about balance. There's a balance between the safety of the pipeline and the cost/profitability of the pipeline. Right now, our fine government seems more interested in the cost/profitability of the pipeline than in the safety side of the pipeline.

As well, Enbridge has proven through their actions that they're not very good at managing the pipelines that they've already built. They've shown that if their pipelines leak they won't respond quickly and they won't do a great job on the clean-up. Why would we trust them with another one?

Jan. 6, 2014, 3:27 p.m.
Posts: 17787
Joined: Oct. 28, 2003

super rare! I've only ever seen 2.

are you kidding? Rare? I've never seen a bus that can go like that one.

Oct. 16, 2015, 1:47 p.m.
Posts: 10077
Joined: Nov. 19, 2002

You want a Chevy truck, but do you still want a diesel?
http://www.nydailynews.com/autos/latest-reviews/review-2016-chevrolet-colorado-diesel-silverado-duramax-article-1.2398751

Oct. 16, 2015, 5:52 p.m.
Posts: 3661
Joined: Aug. 22, 2005

Pretty cool, Hopefully it's well received and the competition wakes up. I'm disappointed in the new Tacomas power plant.

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