New posts

I think I've been doing too much 3D CAD lately

April 18, 2011, 12:08 p.m.
Posts: 569
Joined: Feb. 14, 2006

For work, right now I'm designing an earthquake rated battery shelf for a 48V system.

I take it you must be more on the engineering side of things more than the detailing?

April 18, 2011, 1:18 p.m.
Posts: 0
Joined: June 9, 2009

bah, get Solidworks. Inventor is not as good at sheetmetal(it's catching up), or assemblies. I miss Solidworks.

I havnt used any solidworks before. I like inventor because there is at least a little crossover to 2D autoCAD drawings.
The sheetmetal features in Solidworks have any features for use with flat patterns in heavy plate formings or just light gauge materials?

April 18, 2011, 2:04 p.m.
Posts: 10077
Joined: Nov. 19, 2002

Another former Acad [HTML_REMOVED] then Solidworks guy here.

For 3D, Solidworks is SO much better than Acad. (Although I never used Inventor)

Disclaimer: I guess I should add that I haven't touched either in 3 years so both might have changed since then.

April 18, 2011, 2:18 p.m.
Posts: 0
Joined: Oct. 9, 2009

Another former Acad [HTML_REMOVED] then Solidworks guy here.

For 3D, Solidworks is SO much better than Acad. (Although I never used Inventor)

Inventor is like solidworks powered by Acad. They are pretty much the same thing + or - some features and user interface. Solidworks is a little nicer IMO.

April 18, 2011, 2:35 p.m.
Posts: 1923
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

Autocad sucks for a drawing program.

Clunking is for retards.

April 18, 2011, 2:47 p.m.
Posts: 5329
Joined: Feb. 3, 2006

Autocad sucks for a drawing program.

Yes it does!! Good thing it's not a drawing program.

April 18, 2011, 2:53 p.m.
Posts: 2285
Joined: Feb. 5, 2005

I have closed my eyes at night to see schematics and i/o drawings falling into place like tetris behind my eyelids.

In camp a couple summers ago, I had been soil sampling for ~4 weeks straight. By the end of my rotation I would fall asleep and have dreams that I was out sampling.

There is a reason that you are only legally allowed 6 weeks in camp in BC. Any more and you would be past the point of being able to recover.

That's the problem with cities, they're refuges for the weak, the fish that didn't evolve.

I don't want to google this - sounds like a thing that NSMB will be better at.

April 18, 2011, 5:04 p.m.
Posts: 569
Joined: Feb. 14, 2006

Yes it does!! Good thing it's not a drawing program.

Are you kidding me. AutoCad is the best 2d drawing editor out there.

What do you think is better?

I wish I had access to solidworks.

April 18, 2011, 5:27 p.m.
Posts: 0
Joined: June 9, 2009

^agreed. People get way too carried away with 3D renderings of simple items that don't merit the time and effort in the slightest. Most items are constructed around 2-D measurments and work lines anyways. Now if you're designing hyrdoformed bike frames thats a different story.

April 18, 2011, 5:35 p.m.
Posts: 0
Joined: Oct. 9, 2009

^agreed. People get way too carried away with 3D renderings of simple items that don't merit the time and effort in the slightest. Most items are constructed around 2-D measurments and work lines anyways. Now if you're designing hyrdoformed bike frames thats a different story.

Lots of time the 3D drawings are made to do computer stress tests and stuff. Modeling is only 1 aspect of programs like inventor.

April 18, 2011, 5:39 p.m.
Posts: 0
Joined: Dec. 12, 2007

what where you hoping to find on the back side of the browser?

maybe he was looking for ass?

April 18, 2011, 5:48 p.m.
Posts: 2615
Joined: March 29, 2009

being able to click the negative sensitivity button is really helpful.

I wish I could turn down the sensitivity of my wife lately. :p

April 18, 2011, 5:54 p.m.
Posts: 3048
Joined: Nov. 20, 2004

I take it you must be more on the engineering side of things more than the detailing?

Network engineering actually… The 3D CAD is to make sure everything fits together properly in our equipment enclosure. Visio is really good for diagramming networks and making logical designs that are best suited to 2D, but when it comes to implementing hardware in three dimensional space, AutoCAD works great. I'm not making a lot of really tiny stuff so Solidworks is probably not necessary for my application.

In the most recent project we have an outdoor telecom equipment enclosure that is roughly a 10'x10'x10 cube, in it there's three 42U height two post steel relay racks and a 3 foot high battery shelf. I'm using AutoCAD to fill the interior with insulated foam panels, wall panels, surface mounted electrical (breaker panel, etc), and all the other equipment. Knowing how much room there is for extra stuff in the future is really important, and how much spare rack space to leave for batteries.

"Bicycling is a healthy and manly pursuit with much to recommend it, and, unlike other foolish crazes, it has not died out."
- The Daily Telegraph (1877)

April 18, 2011, 6:22 p.m.
Posts: 0
Joined: March 14, 2006

still learning solidworks here.

but i hear ya, im having a similar problem while switching from rhino to illustrator constantly and mixing commands. (hold spacebar to pan in illus, same thing in rhino repeats last command = disaster). i just busted an 8h solid to meet the deadline on my college project.

ps. oh and i have the most ackward workflow ever: model with pc, while making presentations in illus with a mac on the side, all with the help of synergy.

April 18, 2011, 9:50 p.m.
Posts: 3048
Joined: Nov. 20, 2004

synergy is fucking useful, just gotta remember to only use it on a network you trust, or in a ssh tunnel… it transmits everything in plaintext. I have a linux box here that has a monitor but no keyboard or mouse, I use synergy to roll my mouse off the edge of the adjacent laptop's screen and onto the linux system. saves a ton of desk space.

for those who don't know what it is, basically an inverse KVM switch, done in software.

"Bicycling is a healthy and manly pursuit with much to recommend it, and, unlike other foolish crazes, it has not died out."
- The Daily Telegraph (1877)

Forum jump: