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Hotter than your mom...

Feb. 4, 2016, 9:33 a.m.
Posts: 7707
Joined: Sept. 11, 2003

Sounds like it went well today? I didn't hear how long the plasma was sustained.
Background article I dug up:
http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2015/10/bizarre-reactor-might-save-nuclear-fusion

It was sustained for a few milliseconds. Perceptible to the human eye, but still a lot of work to do. The goal is to sustain it long enough so that it gives off more energy (released by nuclear fusion) than you put in by ignition.

In order for the plasma to be sustained, it must not touch the cold walls of the reactor, so the stellarator’s 425 tonnes (470 tons) of superconducting, super-cooled magnets are used to keep it suspended in one place. At a high enough ignition temperature – along with the aid of an effect called “quantum tunneling” – the hydrogen particles begin to collide and fuse, releasing energy and forming heavier elements.

http://www.iflscience.com/physics/germanys-fusion-reactor-creates-hydrogen-plasma-world-first

Feb. 4, 2016, 9:39 a.m.
Posts: 797
Joined: Feb. 16, 2010

;)Did nobody pay attention to the storyline in Halflife? This is how we are going to get headcrabs running around everywhere! ;)

On a more serious note, hopefully they pull it off successfully and send us into a new era of power generation.

I has more to do with pushing the big yellow crystal into the beam …


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hsTEoGoAxUk

at 14:56.

"You know what's wrong with Vancouver? You can't pee off of your own balcony without getting in trouble"
- Phil Gordon

Feb. 4, 2016, 9:42 a.m.
Posts: 797
Joined: Feb. 16, 2010

Not a physicist but yes thorium has a lot of potential, but so does improved reactors using uranium as a fuel source. I can't remember the exact figure, but current reactor tech only utilizes about 5 or 10% of the available energy in the current fuel sources. End result is more waste with extremely long half lifes and the dangers that come along with that, however it's great for enriching for nuclear arms.

Pending a major break through in fusion tech (not the iterative steps we are seeing here) the world would be much better off focusing on smaller scale safer GenIV fission reactors AND RENEWABLES than to hold off on the far off promise of fusion.

Enjoyed this CBC series from last summer. This episode talked about making current U reactors more efficient, and with less harmful waste.

http://www.cbc.ca/whatawaste/episodes/2014/07/07/nuclear-waste/

"You know what's wrong with Vancouver? You can't pee off of your own balcony without getting in trouble"
- Phil Gordon

Feb. 4, 2016, 9:57 a.m.
Posts: 0
Joined: June 9, 2009

Enjoyed this CBC series from last summer. This episode talked about making current U reactors more efficient, and with less harmful waste.

http://www.cbc.ca/whatawaste/episodes/2014/07/07/nuclear-waste/

Ah thanks this gave me the name that was escaping me - TransAtomic power - was trying to search for their TED talk but couldn't find the right keywords to post it.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AAFWeIp8JT0

And the Coles notes infomercial style vid:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YHwZJPBlwKc

Feb. 4, 2016, 10:22 a.m.
Posts: 797
Joined: Feb. 16, 2010

Ah thanks this gave me the name that was escaping me - TransAtomic power - was trying to search for their TED talk but couldn't find the right keywords to post it.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AAFWeIp8JT0

And the Coles notes infomercial style vid:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YHwZJPBlwKc

Right! I these guys. I thought that their technology seemed the most promising to me. Very neat stuff.

http://www.transatomicpower.com/

"You know what's wrong with Vancouver? You can't pee off of your own balcony without getting in trouble"
- Phil Gordon

Dec. 24, 2016, 6:53 a.m.
Posts: 4329
Joined: Oct. 24, 2005

This is pretty cool.
Didn't know this was going on in South Korea, will try and get a tour sometime:

Korean-fusion-reactor-achieves-record-plasma

The Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) tokamak-type nuclear fusion reactor has achieved a world record of 70 seconds in high-performance plasma operation, South Korea's National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI) has announced.

The institute, based at Daejeon, 160 km south of Seoul, said a fully non-inductive operation mode - called a "high poloidal beta scenario" - has been used to achieve this long and steady state of operation using high-power neutral beam. It said various techniques, including a rotating 3D field, have been applied to alleviate the accumulated heat fluxes on the plasma-facing components.

"The world record for high-performance plasma for more than a minute demonstrated that the KSTAR is the forefront in steady-state plasma operation technology in a superconducting device," NFRI said in a statement today. "This is a huge step forward for realization of the fusion reactor."

In addition, the institute said, KSTAR researchers also succeeded in achieving an alternative advanced plasma operation mode with the internal transport barrier (ITB). This is a steep pressure gradient in the core of the plasmas due to the enhanced core plasma confinement. NFRI said this is the first ITB operation achieved in the superconducting device at the lowest heating power.

"With the progress of the Iter project, the KSTAR research will focus on the mission essential for the fusion reactor beyond Iter," the institute said. "They are new efficient mode of operation and a new divertor concept suitable for the Korean fusion demonstration reactor, the K-DEMO device, which will be the first runner in worldwide fusion energy development plan."

NFRI president Keeman Kim said, "We will exert efforts for KSTAR to continuously produce world-class results, and to promote international joint research among nuclear fusion researchers."

Construction of KSTAR, a tokamak-typed nuclear fusion reactor, began in December 1995 and it was completed in August 2007. The first experiment was conducted in KSTAR in 2009. It was the first in the world to feature a fully superconducting magnet system with a central solenoid, toroidal and poloidal field coils. It measures 8.6 m high, and 8.8 m in diameter.

Tokomak-design reactors like KSTAR use magnetism to contain a toroidal-shaped plasma at temperatures of up to 300 million °C. Despite this temperature it is necessary to cool superconducting magnets to -269°C. Inside the plasma, a few grams of deuterium and tritium atoms are stripped to the nuclei, which fuse to release energy. It is hoped that this form of nuclear energy could one day be used to generate electricity, but maintaining a steady plasma has proven very difficult.

The best things in life all start with the letter B
Hooray for: Bacon, Bikeys, Boobies, Boards, and Beer!

Dec. 25, 2016, 6:37 p.m.
Posts: 8
Joined: Aug. 20, 2010

It would be cleaner, but the end user will still end up paying.

of course! there are still costs to cover. who else can pay if not the end user, for anything that is manufactured or produced?

Dec. 27, 2016, 2 p.m.
Posts: 2285
Joined: Feb. 5, 2005

of course! there are still costs to cover. who else can pay if not the end user, for anything that is manufactured or produced?

But what happens to costs (long term) if energy were to become limitless and almost free? All the costs in the supply chain drop, cost of living drops, wages could drop, further dropping all other costs.

It could cause a massive deflationary cycle, completely upending the world economy. Might be interesting.

That's the problem with cities, they're refuges for the weak, the fish that didn't evolve.

I don't want to google this - sounds like a thing that NSMB will be better at.

Dec. 28, 2016, 1:53 a.m.
Posts: 2080
Joined: April 2, 2005

But what happens to costs (long term) if energy were to become limitless and almost free? All the costs in the supply chain drop, cost of living drops, wages could drop, further dropping all other costs.

It could cause a massive deflationary cycle, completely upending the world economy. Might be interesting.

newsflash: thats already happening with renewables

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-12-15/world-energy-hits-a-turning-point-solar-that-s-cheaper-than-wind

MTB-Freeride.TV

Dec. 28, 2016, 11:50 a.m.
Posts: 341
Joined: Jan. 24, 2008

But what happens to costs (long term) if energy were to become limitless and almost free? All the costs in the supply chain drop, cost of living drops, wages could drop, further dropping all other costs.

It could cause a massive deflationary cycle, completely upending the world economy. Might be interesting.

Energy is only one part of the economy. It could also create a boom as companies and people rush to provide services/equipment/automation that harness the idea of unlimited energy.

http://www.wildrootsphotography.ca/

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