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Climate Change - so I'm starting to panic a bit

May 21, 2019, 7:31 p.m.
Posts: 743
Joined: March 18, 2017

Cruise ships seem like a huge fucking waste. 

They either run off Bunker C or Heavy Crude. All the supplies needed for a voyage. All the shitty cunts flying into and out of the departure and arrival ports.

May 21, 2019, 7:43 p.m.
Posts: 14460
Joined: Dec. 30, 2002

Posted by: Brocklanders

Trying to reduce my family's waste and carbon footprint as much as possible. Have to say the amount of plastic waste we produce is insane.....I'm glad it's all on the table now, but  It's so disheartening to see when steps are taken for a more environmentally conscious reason some self centered group tries to sue or stop it. Like the plastic bag assn trying to sue Victoria or anti wind farm coalitions suing due to its an eyesore.

What if I sadly informed you that recycling and these efforts are generally just a Nothern thing? At least from what I've seen locally living with different people that recycling and sorting anything is a completely foreign concept to a lot of people. I'd say 1-2 in 8 people recycle world wide.

May 21, 2019, 8:30 p.m.
Posts: 977
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002

Posted by: Endur-Bro

Cruise ships seem like a huge fucking waste. 

They either run off Bunker C or Heavy Crude. All the supplies needed for a voyage. All the shitty cunts flying into and out of the departure and arrival ports.

Then start to think about where most of our consumer goods come from and how they get here. When you start to expand your thinking about what's impacting climate change suddenly the outcome becomes very grim. Our lifestyles need to completely change.

May 21, 2019, 8:41 p.m.
Posts: 122
Joined: Oct. 23, 2003

Posted by: syncro

Posted by: Endur-Bro

Cruise ships seem like a huge fucking waste. 

They either run off Bunker C or Heavy Crude. All the supplies needed for a voyage. All the shitty cunts flying into and out of the departure and arrival ports.

Then start to think about where most of our consumer goods come from and how they get here. When you start to expand your thinking about what's impacting climate change suddenly the outcome becomes very grim. Our lifestyles need to completely change.

I mean yeah, but cruise ships are the easy target of excess above and beyond all of what you said.. to heck with them!

May 21, 2019, 8:43 p.m.
Posts: 977
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002

Posted by: aShogunNamedMarcus

What if I sadly informed you that recycling and these efforts are generally just a Nothern thing? At least from what I've seen locally living with different people that recycling and sorting anything is a completely foreign concept to a lot of people. I'd say 1-2 in 8 people recycle world wide.

lol - I'd say maybe 1-2 in 80 or 800 recycle with any sort of regularity or volume. 

Instead of recycling though we should be focused on reducing the amount waste we unnecessarily generate - single serving drinks and food items and excess packaging of all sorts. As a first step I'd like to see plastics banned from use in any sort of disposable format.

May 21, 2019, 9:27 p.m.
Posts: 1457
Joined: Aug. 6, 2009

Posted by: aShogunNamedMarcus

What if I sadly informed you that recycling and these efforts are generally just a Nothern thing? At least from what I've seen locally living with different people that recycling and sorting anything is a completely foreign concept to a lot of people. I'd say 1-2 in 8 people recycle world wide.

When China stopped accepting used plastic and paper last year, it completely disrupted the economics of recycling. Many cities in the US cancelled their recycling programs because they couldn't get rid of all the stuff they were collecting, or the cost to get rid of it became too high. It turns out the rest of the world doesn't want our garbage anymore.

Ironically, Catalyst Paper's recycling plant in Coquitlam shut down almost 10 years ago because China was buying up all the recycled paper at premium prices, and Catalyst couldn't compete.

On the positive side of things, three weeks ago, Britain's power grid ran for a week without using coal for the first time in over 100 years. Their goal is to be coal free by 2025. Some of that will be replaced by natural gas, but some by solar and wind power. Change can happen, but it is slow.

Reducing the amount of waste we create is the message I'm trying to pass on to my kids.


 Last edited by: PaulB on May 21, 2019, 9:29 p.m., edited 1 time in total.
May 21, 2019, 10:43 p.m.
Posts: 2019
Joined: April 2, 2005

even in germany most garbage gets burned, i stopped separating my garbage years ago

May 22, 2019, 4:31 a.m.
Posts: 350
Joined: Nov. 6, 2006

How about water guys? I still believe we need to start work on building up our capacities to store water. I think in the near future water in some places will be in short supply. I’ve supported site c for some time,not for hydro generation but for the water. And in my mind site c should not be the only one. I would not be surprised if in the future water will be a very valuable commodity.

May 22, 2019, 4:36 a.m.
Posts: 350
Joined: Nov. 6, 2006

Posted by: Sethimus

even in germany most garbage gets burned, i stopped separating my garbage years ago

We incinerate some of our garbage to. I remember a ways back when either Vancouver or Burnaby wanted to ramp up incinerating but I dont really know how that went. Anybody else know? 

And what are the emissions like?

May 22, 2019, 8:05 a.m.
Posts: 1095
Joined: Feb. 26, 2015

Posted by: FLATCH

Posted by: Sethimus

even in germany most garbage gets burned, i stopped separating my garbage years ago

We incinerate some of our garbage to. I remember a ways back when either Vancouver or Burnaby wanted to ramp up incinerating but I dont really know how that went. Anybody else know?

And what are the emissions like?

It was shot down. The irony is all the trucks running garbage up to the landfill in Cache Creek create much more pollution than what the new tech incinerator/generators produce.

Sweden has been importing garbage to keep theirs going.

https://www.trtworld.com/europe/swedish-recycling-so-successful-it-is-importing-rubbish-24491/amp

Wanna really bum yourself out, watch the Plastic Ocean doc on Netflix. It's brutal


 Last edited by: Brocklanders on May 22, 2019, 8:17 a.m., edited 4 times in total.
May 22, 2019, 9:14 a.m.
Posts: 9884
Joined: June 29, 2006

The problem with a lot of the predictions is that our climate is inherently unpredictable.  We have been good at predicting the future as long as it follows a trajectory, but there are many different tipping points we can encounter, including our own behaviour that we cannot predict.  We might already be experiencing it, or we might not.  I think the best we can hope for is that we have not hit the tipping point but that warming coupled with a few anomalous years frighten the shit out of humanity so we act before it is too late.  

As a backup plan, we should figure out where RM's bunker is located.

May 22, 2019, 11:59 a.m.
Posts: 14460
Joined: Dec. 30, 2002

Posted by: PaulB

Reducing the amount of waste we create is the message I'm trying to pass on to my kids.

Idealistic. Put them in some MMA so they can "instill" a sense of care into those who don't :p

Consider what I posted about the 2L bottle and then realize things like this are happening all over Vancouver. Then consider most newcomer's to the City that arent Canadian probably dont give a shit about recycling and dont even realize the climate issue's because Vancouver's weather is just better than pretty much everywhere. Local affect?

What you posted about China was a) news to me and b) could explain the recent news video of the drone footage going over the massive garbage pile in Lost Angeles (and them rats have the Typhus).

Our current delivery systems and manufacturing need to change to a more local or balanced geo-centric idea (east and west side mfgr/distro). Why am I buying a new hard plastic container for my laundry detergent pods instead of just re-filling that same container via a bulk system (sure, they'd spill/break open) or going back to the much lighter bag (sure, kids would eat 'em again and die). Why does Tim Horton's ship donuts across the country in a truck? Then we could get into stupid things Canada does like export raw reimport finished (trans-oceanic shipping because why?) or sell hydro cheap then buy back at inflated prices.  But then we have to pay more as profits go down. So it's a lot more than just delivery systems. It's business models. Government reg's. Stocks. Futures and speculation of everything. And of course, human greed and purposeful ignorance.

This might be an extreme statement but (the majority of) people wont care let alone pay attention unless some sort of example was made of certain business's and people. And that example would have to be accepted by either a Country and or then the World. I can again sadly say that simply wont happen unless some crazy shit went down. Like crazy Georgia Guidestone type stuff.

May 22, 2019, 12:06 p.m.
Posts: 14460
Joined: Dec. 30, 2002

Posted by: Brocklanders

Wanna really bum yourself out, watch the Plastic Ocean doc on Netflix. It's brutal

I thought some young kid from Baltimore worked out a prototype reeler vessel that'd convert the majority of gyre's contents into plastic rope? Or someone and something had that a while ago. Possible better solution would be to retrofit any oil rigs the vicinity and just have them pull the gyre's in and process it as a site.

Found something close to it. This isnt quite what I remember but it'll do:

https://inhabitat.com/19-year-old-student-develops-ocean-cleanup-array-that-could-remove-7250000-tons-of-plastic-from-the-worlds-oceans/


 Last edited by: aShogunNamedMarcus on May 22, 2019, 12:08 p.m., edited 1 time in total.
May 22, 2019, 1:06 p.m.
Posts: 1265
Joined: May 23, 2006

Posted by: aShogunNamedMarcus

. I'd say 1-2 in 8 people recycle world wide.

I'd say your math is fucked up! Are you just naive?

How about water guys?

I'll tell you about water. When push comes to shove Nestle will just invade and take it.

Next question.


 Last edited by: tungsten on May 22, 2019, 1:08 p.m., edited 2 times in total.
May 22, 2019, 1:09 p.m.
Posts: 14460
Joined: Dec. 30, 2002

So if I'm reading that link right, thats 7.25 billion tonnes of plastic. Would the sea levels go down one iota if it was all removed?

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