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Car vs truck for sea to sky mtb ppl

June 20, 2018, 10:45 p.m.
Posts: 1968
Joined: May 2, 2004

Any of you fellow sea to sky mtbers make the switch from a truck to a car? Regret it? Love it? 

My 26 year old truck has died, the idea of a smaller more economical car of some kind is appealing but worried I'll regret not having a 4x4 pick up anymore... 

I'm sure I'm similar to a lot of you, I bike+ski. Don't have a sled or moto or anything, commute within whistler mostly. Never shuttle anymore. Only make use of 4x4 on the snowiest days or a very rare bush camping trip. Very rare that I did 4 bikes +4 people. 

I'm a cheap bum so I'm looking at used vehicles that cost less than most of our bikes. Going to roll without a vehicle for a bit I almost never drive during bike season anyways.


 Last edited by: Kevin26 on June 20, 2018, 10:47 p.m., edited 1 time in total.
June 21, 2018, 8:25 a.m.
Posts: 1338
Joined: Feb. 17, 2009

I had a friend who was a ski instructor in Whistler and drove a 2001 Hyundai accent with the best winter tires he could afford, never got stuck. If you're willing to spend money on winter tires, I don't think that you need a 4x4 vehicle if you're not off-roading.

June 21, 2018, 10:21 a.m.
Posts: 12624
Joined: Jan. 27, 2003

Maybe an awd subaru would work for you?  An older forester or impreza wagon or something. Could carry a bike or two and still be capable for winter driving. 

As a side note my mom is selling her impreza wagon with a set of winters as she just got a newer forester. It's a good car and cheap as chips if you don't mind driving stick.

June 21, 2018, 11:07 a.m.
Posts: 10625
Joined: June 29, 2006

I drove Whistler to Van 5 days a week in the winter of 16/17 in a 2000 Nissan Maxima with decent-ish snowies and never had a problem.  And it snowed a lot that winter.  An all-wheel-drive would be better, but more gas too.

June 21, 2018, 11:24 a.m.
Posts: 19
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

Second rnayel

Just get a cheap front wheel drive car and good winter tires. I had a dodge colt, cost me 1000$ and it worked perfectly fine. Never got stuck, regularly passed SUV and pickup trucks in the ditch.

June 21, 2018, 11:37 a.m.
Posts: 299
Joined: June 21, 2010

When I was in my early 20's I had a 91 honda accord with good snowies on it. It was possibly the best vehicle I have ever owned.

June 21, 2018, 12:12 p.m.
Posts: 1535
Joined: Feb. 26, 2015

Posted by: Fast-Orange

Maybe an awd subaru would work for you?  An older forester or impreza wagon or something. Could carry a bike or two and still be capable for winter driving. 

As a side note my mom is selling her impreza wagon with a set of winters as she just got a newer forester. It's a good car and cheap as chips if you don't mind driving stick.

Please tell us more

June 21, 2018, 12:29 p.m.
Posts: 12624
Joined: Jan. 27, 2003

Posted by: Brocklanders

Posted by: Fast-Orange

Maybe an awd subaru would work for you?  An older forester or impreza wagon or something. Could carry a bike or two and still be capable for winter driving. 

As a side note my mom is selling her impreza wagon with a set of winters as she just got a newer forester. It's a good car and cheap as chips if you don't mind driving stick.

Please tell us more

Check your pms

June 22, 2018, 9:33 a.m.
Posts: 1461
Joined: April 25, 2003

Well, I'll go the other way and say truck.  

You don't drive much, so increased fuel costs won't hurt the wallet much.  You're buying cheap so you can walk away if fuel prices climb enough that they do hurt.  This way, for the increased fuel consumption on the little driving you do do, you have the increased utility of a truck.  I really like mine for getting things done on the house, getting a little further into the woods for camping/exploring, taking lots of bikes and other toys on road trips, and it makes me a little money doing a little carpentry and landscaping work on the side as well.  Also, when the weather is shit, a car with good tires is totally fine, but a vehicle with good tires AND 4WD or AWD is freakin' awesome.

So, not the cheapest option, but based on how much you drive may not cost you much extra at all.  How much extra is worth the utility is your decision.  Personally I'm getting sick of how much fuel my DERGE uses, but I drive it more than I planned on and it has a big dumb 5.9L V-8 in it and I can't stomach the payments for a new, significantly more efficient truck.

June 22, 2018, 3:20 p.m.
Posts: 970
Joined: March 18, 2017

Posted by: Fast-Orange

As a side note my mom is selling her impreza wagon with a set of winters as she just got a newer forester. It's a good car and cheap as chips if you don't mind driving stick.

More details on this one. Year? Mileage? Price? 

If you don't get a Quad Cab TRD Tacoma how will people even know that you mtn bike and ski/snowboard?

In Whistler/S2S area if you're not driving often I'd take a look at an older Subie with the head casket issue fixed already or smaller older truck.

Ed. 

I have a 4L V6 SUV, a Subie wagon and an Acura EL 5-spd that I picked up for $500 almost two months ago.  The Acura is my DD now at ~6.5L/100Km compared to the truck at ~13+L/100Km.  The Acura may get scrapped for an EV at some point though.


 Last edited by: Endur-Bro on June 22, 2018, 3:24 p.m., edited 1 time in total.
June 23, 2018, 1:03 p.m.
Posts: 125
Joined: June 17, 2016

Maybe run the numbers on a couple of scenarios? Like buying a 4wd truck vs buying a subi vs buying a small economical fwd car and renting a 4wd truck x times per year?

I have an older Subi wagon which is great for our camping trips where we bring a lot of gear but the rest of the year it's basically just a car with pretty bad fuel economy.

June 23, 2018, 1:51 p.m.
Posts: 12624
Joined: Jan. 27, 2003

Posted by: Endur-Bro

Posted by: Fast-Orange

As a side note my mom is selling her impreza wagon with a set of winters as she just got a newer forester. It's a good car and cheap as chips if you don't mind driving stick.

More details on this one. Year? Mileage? Price? 

If you don't get a Quad Cab TRD Tacoma how will people even know that you mtn bike and ski/snowboard?

In Whistler/S2S area if you're not driving often I'd take a look at an older Subie with the head casket issue fixed already or smaller older truck.

Ed. 

I have a 4L V6 SUV, a Subie wagon and an Acura EL 5-spd that I picked up for $500 almost two months ago.  The Acura is my DD now at ~6.5L/100Km compared to the truck at ~13+L/100Km.  The Acura may get scrapped for an EV at some point though.

2004, about 150 on the odo, head gasket and belt done at 135, dark green 

Asking 3500 obo

June 24, 2018, 8:04 a.m.
Posts: 1461
Joined: April 25, 2003

Posted by: niels@nsmb.com

Maybe run the numbers on a couple of scenarios? Like buying a 4wd truck vs buying a subi vs buying a small economical fwd car and renting a 4wd truck x times per year?

I have an older Subi wagon which is great for our camping trips where we bring a lot of gear but the rest of the year it's basically just a car with pretty bad fuel economy.

I'd second this, old AWD Subaru's may be the size of a small car, but they're heavy and underpowered so they tend to guzzle gas.  A 4-cyl Taco or Colorado and a AWD Outback may have pretty similar fuel economy, depending on the year and condition.  If fuel efficiency is your top concern I'd look at Civics, Golfs, Matrix's etc. - simpler small cars with more efficient engines.

June 24, 2018, 10:13 a.m.
Posts: 1171
Joined: Nov. 8, 2003

Don't Subarus have a more robust frame for the hitch to mount to and better load capacity though? 

That is the one issue I've had going from a truck to an econo-box car, the low payload capacity makes the car's suspension struggle a bit with 2 big bikes on the hitch mount.

June 24, 2018, 5:37 p.m.
Posts: 3671
Joined: Aug. 22, 2005

Nissan X-Trail? Seem to be cheap these days. Selectable AWD, Same 2.5L engine as a lot of other Nissan cars. Suzuki SX4 hatch back is supposedly good too. 

Can get a manual transmission in both if you care about that sort of thing.

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