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How To Get Started?

Dec. 3, 2005, 9:26 a.m.
Posts: 7707
Joined: Sept. 11, 2003

Another thing to consider is the materials. Carbon and Aluminum tend to be rigid frames which give you lots of leverage but are less forgiving over long rides. Steel and Ti are flex better and can give you a more comforable ride, especially over long periods of time. Carbon forks also add some forgiveness to the ride.

Check out used road bikes. Road bikes tend to take less abuse than mountain bikes and you can sometimes find used road bikes that look to be in mint condition.

My only other advice is to buy a bike, any bike that fits you and just ride, ride, ride so you get an idea of what you like and don't like. If you want to add more variety to road riding, check out a cyclocross bike. Cyclocross rules!!!! D.

Dec. 5, 2005, 12:39 p.m.
Posts: 669
Joined: Nov. 15, 2002

Who is the mod for this forum? This thread should be permanently stickied so first-time buyers read it first before asking more specific questions.

Done.

Where do people go for road bike reviews/opinions? My searches so far have resulted in next to nothing about our locally developed road bikes (Rocky, Norco, etc.).

Dec. 5, 2005, 1:28 p.m.
Posts: 7543
Joined: June 17, 2003

Done.

Where do people go for road bike reviews/opinions? My searches so far have resulted in next to nothing about our locally developed road bikes (Rocky, Norco, etc.).

Sweet, thanks for the sticky.

There aren't many reviews of Rocky/Norco/Kona road bikes due to lack of distribution or low sales numbers in the US. The only exception being Kona's cyclocross bikes, which have always had a great reputation.

RM even dropped road bikes completely from their lineup in 2002 and 2003. (I have an RM Team Scandium frame waiting to be built up as my main road bike.)

If you have a specific question, let us know and we'll steer you in the right direction.:) For reviews of the Giant/Trek/Cannondale/Specialized variety, you can try RoadBikeReview.com.

"The song of a bird…We used to ask Ennesson to do bird calls. He could do them. How he could do them, and when he perished, along with him went all those birds…"-Return from the Stars, Stanislaw Lem

"We just walk around, and sometimes we go out and dance, and then we listen to the environment."-Ralf Hutter, Kraftwerk

Dec. 6, 2005, 5:40 p.m.
Posts: 659
Joined: March 17, 2005

I need to know what I should be looking for, parts wise, size, price etc……

I`m looking at spending around $2000…….what should I be going for????

There hasn't been much talk about them, but check out Marinoni. They're Canadian built (Montreal) and a custom frame with carbon fork will run you less than $1K. Then add a wheelset and grouppo and you can squeek in for under $2.5k.

La Bicicleta carries them. A custom order usually takes 6 weeks or so.

I learned the hard way to towel off my bike before the dog. I'd rather have a slightly oily dog than a hairy bike.

Beautiful west coast, ocean inspired pottery.

Dec. 6, 2005, 6:25 p.m.
Posts: 3048
Joined: Nov. 20, 2004

reviews of the Giant/Trek/Cannondale/Specialized variety, you can try RoadBikeReview.com.

speaking of Giant, compare a high-res photo of a Giant TCR1 Carbon to Devinci's high-end carbon frame… they come out of the SAME FACTORY in taiwan. One gets a Giant sticker, the other gets a Devinci sticker. :D :D

"Bicycling is a healthy and manly pursuit with much to recommend it, and, unlike other foolish crazes, it has not died out."
- The Daily Telegraph (1877)

Dec. 6, 2005, 7:03 p.m.
Posts: 1213
Joined: Nov. 19, 2002

Check this out:
http://bikes.com/bikes/2006/solo/solo-30ac.aspx
I rode a Solo for a couple weeks; It handled great, was stiff, but the ride was not too harsh. If you want a cushier ride, they also offer a steel/carbon combo.

I am about 6'1", but have long arms and legs, and a short torso. The 57 fit real well with a 120 stem. My long arms compensated for the fairly big seat to handlebar drop.

With 10-speed Shimano, I find the greatest advantage isnt in the extra gear, but rather in the ergonomics of the shifter itself; The "waists" of the STI lever are narrower, and the bulk is moved up higher. This allows you to run the shifter further up on your hanldebar with a nice, flat transition from bar to hood. You can use the larger "top" of the shifter as a sort of aero bar as well.

intelligent designer jeans
cornichons > dills

Dec. 6, 2005, 7:48 p.m.
Posts: 3048
Joined: Nov. 20, 2004

That RM frame reminds me of the aluminum/carbon fibre seatstay frame used on the Felt F65 and F55:

http://www.feltracing.com/06/06_bikes/f65/

http://www.feltracing.com/06/06_bikes/f55/

"Bicycling is a healthy and manly pursuit with much to recommend it, and, unlike other foolish crazes, it has not died out."
- The Daily Telegraph (1877)

Dec. 6, 2005, 10:37 p.m.
Posts: 11204
Joined: Nov. 18, 2004

speaking of Giant, compare a high-res photo of a Giant TCR1 Carbon to Devinci's high-end carbon frame… they come out of the SAME FACTORY in taiwan. One gets a Giant sticker, the other gets a Devinci sticker. :D :D

Are you sure about that? My Devinci was made in the US and painted (I think) in Canada. Are you sure it wasn't a Chicane or something?

Feb. 14, 2006, 2:45 p.m.
Posts: 1911
Joined: Feb. 9, 2006

Hi there

was just looking at a lightly used Cannondale R600 - I am new to the roadie thing too and am looking for opinions..Is this a good starter bike or should I up the ante?

Feb. 14, 2006, 3:32 p.m.
Posts: 7543
Joined: June 17, 2003

Hi there

was just looking at a lightly used Cannondale R600 - I am new to the roadie thing too and am looking for opinions..Is this a good starter bike or should I up the ante?

Completely depends on your goals and what you want to use the bike for.

People rarely find the perfect bike on the first try, so I'm inclined to say buy within your means. You can buy your dream bike when you know exactly what you want in a road bike.

Also, I think there's a healthy market for used entry-level road bikes (of recent vintage), so you won't lose your shirt if you decide to sell it after a season.

"The song of a bird…We used to ask Ennesson to do bird calls. He could do them. How he could do them, and when he perished, along with him went all those birds…"-Return from the Stars, Stanislaw Lem

"We just walk around, and sometimes we go out and dance, and then we listen to the environment."-Ralf Hutter, Kraftwerk

Feb. 14, 2006, 3:54 p.m.
Posts: 1336
Joined: Dec. 4, 2002

Anyone interested in a 59cm Quattro Assi AluCarbonio w/ 105 components, carbon bar, Aerohead/DA wheels, Roox road stem? 58.5cm top tube. Got enough parts to mix match or whatever.

Lots of miles, a number of races but solid. PM me if yer 6+ft tall and looking to buy a roadie.

Ride More Bitch Less

Feb. 14, 2006, 3:55 p.m.
Posts: 3048
Joined: Nov. 20, 2004

Hi there

was just looking at a lightly used Cannondale R600 - I am new to the roadie thing too and am looking for opinions..Is this a good starter bike or should I up the ante?

depends what year of R600 it is… and if it fits you right, and what the price is. this is nearly the best time of year to buy a new road bike, if you can find a shop with some 2005s still in stock. they'll be clearing them out at near dealer cost. I saw a post on another forum last week from a guy who got a Trek 1500 (MSRP $1150 USD) for $845 including sales tax.

R600 is mostly tiagra level stuff, good entry level 9-speed drive train. See if the seller knows if it's a CAAD5 or CAAD7 frame…

"Bicycling is a healthy and manly pursuit with much to recommend it, and, unlike other foolish crazes, it has not died out."
- The Daily Telegraph (1877)

Feb. 14, 2006, 3:57 p.m.
Posts: 3048
Joined: Nov. 20, 2004

Anyone interested in a 59cm Quattro Assi AluCarbonio w/ 105 components, carbon bar, Aerohead/DA wheels, Roox road stem? 58.5cm top tube. Got enough parts to mix match or whatever.

Lots of miles, a number of races but solid. PM me if yer 6+ft tall and looking to buy a roadie.

you might try posting it at the Cycling BC road for sale section:
http://www.cycling.bc.ca/index.php?id=173

"Bicycling is a healthy and manly pursuit with much to recommend it, and, unlike other foolish crazes, it has not died out."
- The Daily Telegraph (1877)

Feb. 14, 2006, 5:16 p.m.
Posts: 1911
Joined: Feb. 9, 2006

cool thanks - also looking at a 2004 OCR2….which I think may be the better bike…

Feb. 14, 2006, 8:20 p.m.
Posts: 1336
Joined: Dec. 4, 2002

Yes, the OCR is a better bike.

Walrus, I'd rather float the bike through here as means of getting someone into road riding and maybe racing. Low key bro scene instead of the hoidy self-important mirror gazing roadie crew that I just love to taunt.

Ride More Bitch Less

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