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War On Fat

Nov. 25, 2013, 9:12 p.m.
Posts: 1126
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002

"CONCLUSIONS: Low carbohydrate-high protein diets, used on a regular basis and without consideration of the nature of carbohydrates or the source of proteins, are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease."

Just sayin' ….

Wow, at the very least both myself and Jeff Volek were hoodwinked.

well to be fair here if one were to give serious thought to the part i highlighted there the conclusion is not definitively saying that low carb-high pro diets are bad.

context is everything

Nov. 25, 2013, 9:15 p.m.
Posts: 26384
Joined: Aug. 14, 2005

True dat. There is no regulation as to who can call themselves a nutritionist, and no minimum requirements to do so.

Kn.

Shirk and KenN speak the truth.

And beware of talking anyone at the gym, a lot of those where "certified" through groups like Can Fit Pro. Great on paper but a bit lacking.

www.thisiswhy.co.uk

www.teamnfi.blogspot.com/

Nov. 25, 2013, 9:40 p.m.
Posts: 7707
Joined: Sept. 11, 2003

Wow, at the very least both myself and Jeff Volek were hoodwinked.

Jeff Volek, PhD, RD, professor and nutrition researcher at the University of Connecticut adds that, "It will be interesting to see how quickly other countries follow suit, recognizing that managing carbohydrates is the key to handling certain health conditions. Lower-fat varieties of foods are often higher in sugars and carbohydrates, which is simply counter-intuitive for people who need to control metabolism-related conditions like diabetes, metabolic syndrome and insulin sensitivity, all of which are related to obesity."

Nothing earth-shattering in the 2 comments (bold) above.

As far as I know it is generally agreed that managing carbohydrates is the key (like Bloomberg's proposed supersize soda tax) … the point of the Swedish experts is that that once you have reached the point where you are obese, there is little to be gained going low-fat … it is more effective to tackle your carbohydrate intake directly, at least for the first 6 months. And over the long term, a low carb diet seems to have no advantage over a low-fat diet.

The point is nobody is prescribing these diets to healthy people.

well to be fair here if one were to give serious thought to the part i highlighted there the conclusion is not definitively saying that low carb-high pro diets are bad.

True, and this is just one study of one demographic - middle-aged Swedish women (grrrrr!).

Nov. 25, 2013, 9:44 p.m.
Posts: 11003
Joined: June 4, 2008

Have you guys ever tried it?

I did. The first 48 hours were hell. Then it was pretty amazing. Fat loss, energy, etc. etc.

Too bad I fucking love pizza and beer and chips and nachos. Because I ain't giving that up.

Nov. 25, 2013, 9:55 p.m.
Posts: 16121
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

a lot of mistruth there - like the implied suggestion the brain only runs on glucose.

I'm really not sure how you read that as an implied suggestion. That was not the intent, and I certainly know that's not true. But as carbs in the body are depleted, glycogen stores are tapped to make up the energy shortage.

Kn.

When one person suffers from a delusion, it is called insanity.

When many people suffer from a delusion, it is called religion.

Nov. 25, 2013, 10:16 p.m.
Posts: 1126
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002

I'm really not sure how you read that as an implied suggestion. That was not the intent, and I certainly know that's not true. But as carbs in the body are depleted, glycogen stores are tapped to make up the energy shortage.

Kn.

reading this part:

because starving oneself of carbs causes the body to reach into glycogen stores to fulfill energy needs for important stuff like, oh, getting your brain to function.

may impart the message that the brain only runs on glucose. while it's true that some glucose is necessary for brain fucntion, we can get by on levels lower that what is currently recommended.

and yes, as blood glucose and then muscle glycogen stores are depleted our bodies will tap into liver glycogen stores. however, if our bodies are adapted to running on fats (and ketones) this demand for glucose will not be as high.

so where i see a need for greater research is in how our energy expenditures affect our ability to burn carbs or fat as a fuel source. for example will a endurance athlete function better on a high-carb diet or will they function equally well on a low carb diet? and what implications does this have for the avg joe who's typical longest aerobic effort may only be an hour? maybe that person has no issues functioning well on a low carb diet.

context is everything

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