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The Running Thread

Oct. 22, 2020, 2:12 p.m.
Posts: 12891
Joined: Nov. 24, 2002

Am currently reading a book on breathing right now...Breathing for Warriors....and it states more or less that running is a way to learn a proper breathing pattern while using the diaphragm and pelvic floor. 

Being the creative and naive idiot that I am, after 4 years of no running at all, did a 5km run yesterday, 60 sec of running, followed by 120 sec of walking. Was really fun, never would have thought that riding bikes and lifting stuff would keep me that fresh. 

Today though....can hardly walk, my calves are killing me. Long-term goal....turning 50 in three years, and running the half marathon in Are, Sweden, has always been part of my life goals, guess I am back on track of prepping for that one.  So....one day I hope I run that one. Was registered four years ago, but that summer did not go as planned.

Oct. 26, 2020, 10:16 p.m.
Posts: 1589
Joined: Aug. 6, 2009

Biking fitness carries over to running, but there's only one way to get your leg muscles and joints used to the impact of running.

Three years is plenty of time to work up to running a half-marathon, even just running a couple or three times a week.

For my 50th this summer, I did the Baden Powell trail from east to west, 54km. Two years ago, the longest run I'd ever done was was 15km, a handful of times.

Oct. 27, 2020, 6:26 a.m.
Posts: 1702
Joined: Feb. 26, 2015

Posted by: PaulB

Biking fitness carries over to running, but there's only one way to get your leg muscles and joints used to the impact of running.

Three years is plenty of time to work up to running a half-marathon, even just running a couple or three times a week.

For my 50th this summer, I did the Baden Powell trail from east to west, 54km. Two years ago, the longest run I'd ever done was was 15km, a handful of times.

Also very important: join a running group thru a shop like running room or whatever that has people who can coach you on proper running technique. Without that you will pound your joints into the ground. Learn how to push yourself forward and glide along instead of punishing your body needlessly.

Then also have to figure out if you are a mid strike or heel strike runner?  Do you pronate when you run? Proper shoes are key... paying the extra and getting them fit by a running shop is well worth it. Don't cheap out on your shoes, find a brand that works and stick with them.


 Last edited by: Brocklanders on Oct. 27, 2020, 7:09 a.m., edited 1 time in total.
Oct. 27, 2020, 10:47 a.m.
Posts: 12891
Joined: Nov. 24, 2002

Posted by: PaulB

Biking fitness carries over to running, but there's only one way to get your leg muscles and joints used to the impact of running.

Three years is plenty of time to work up to running a half-marathon, even just running a couple or three times a week.

For my 50th this summer, I did the Baden Powell trail from east to west, 54km. Two years ago, the longest run I'd ever done was was 15km, a handful of times.

To be honest, I am quite scared of the terrain up in Sweden. Kind of like Whistler but without the jagged peaks, but rocks and roots and wet galore. If you got time, check out the Fjallmaraton in Are, Sweden.

Oct. 27, 2020, 1:55 p.m.
Posts: 8330
Joined: Jan. 18, 2004

Got a new running watch, Garmin 935.  Anyone use one?  I know the V02 max and pace predictors are more relative and shouldn't be taken too seriously, but I can't help but try to get those numbers up.  I understand the race predictor times on my watch are just my estimated V02max put into a chart. 

Anyone have experience with their projected race times and real world performances? 

I've had the watch only a week, so I'm still getting used to it.  Had a Forerunner 10 (?)  from 2013, and a 205 before that, and the original 101 in 2004.  This new one has way more than distance and pace, which is what all my others had. Fun to go through all the metrics, but I wonder what's worth looking at and what's just there to sell the watch.

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