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strength training discussion thread

Dec. 3, 2013, 6:48 p.m.
Posts: 0
Joined: Oct. 6, 2005

once you start getting north of 7 reps the effect of building strength declines significantly.

I understand that fully, but Crossfit has an insane desire to do millions of reps. I don't get it.

Training splits are interesting as is training volume. I was a Mike Mentzer fan and started doing small volumes of reps and exercises and got strong real quick years ago.

Dec. 3, 2013, 7:45 p.m.
Posts: 100
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002

I understand that fully, but Crossfit has an insane desire to do millions of reps. I don't get it.

Training splits are interesting as is training volume. I was a Mike Mentzer fan and started doing small volumes of reps and exercises and got strong real quick years ago.

that's because xfit is not focused on building strength, it about building the all-around athlete, which is a good goal. the choice though is to be good at a number of things and excel at nothing.

when it comes to playing with training variables there are so many options, but the most under-rated factor is rest. without adequate rest the "best program in the world" will not deliver.

as the article that RM linked to pointed out, specificity is critical if one wants to excel at a given sport or task. variability is still important, but it needs to fall within the specificity of training for the desired task.

context is everything

Dec. 3, 2013, 8:27 p.m.
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Joined: Oct. 6, 2005

as the article that RM linked to pointed out, specificity is critical if one wants to excel at a given sport or task. variability is still important, but it needs to fall within the specificity of training for the desired task.

Including crossfit apparently!

Dec. 6, 2013, 11:38 p.m.
Posts: 1620
Joined: May 23, 2006

if you're asking if one could you get carpal tunnel syndrome from doing wrist curls a couple times per week then the answer would be no. carpal tunnel is a repetitive strain injury.

Dunno' man.
I got it from one weekend of kayaking with a paddle with feathered blades.

“.....with a malevolent fascist swine atop its titular apex, the pitiful wounded beast of a rotten, spiritually dead American Superpower is careening towards epic barbarism while pushing the species dangerously to the tipping points of extinction.”

Dec. 6, 2013, 11:53 p.m.
Posts: 100
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002

Dunno' man.
I got it from one weekend of kayaking with a paddle with feathered blades.

a whole weekend of kayaking, especially if you weren't conditioned for it, is a helluva lot different from doing a few sets of wrist curls with proper progression.

an easy way to injure oneself is to spend a lot of time doing an acitivity with a repetetive motion (such as paddling or running) in a short period of time.

context is everything

Dec. 19, 2013, 9:50 p.m.
Posts: 1584
Joined: June 20, 2003

I've been doing heavier deadlifts lately and am wondering if the bar height off the ground can affect one's form. The bar at the gym has weights that are wider in diameter than what I have at home. I've been doing a weight that is a 3rep max for me. What do I need to be concerned about doing this same weight at home where I will be lifting from 2" lower?

Dec. 19, 2013, 9:59 p.m.
Posts: 11074
Joined: June 4, 2008

I've been doing heavier deadlifts lately and am wondering if the bar height off the ground can affect one's form. The bar at the gym has weights that are wider in diameter than what I have at home. I've been doing a weight that is a 3rep max for me. What do I need to be concerned about doing this same weight at home where I will be lifting from 2" lower?

The closer the bar is to the top of your feet means the greater chance of you rounding your lower back. Rounded lower back when near your 1RM = greater chance of injury.

Powerlifters training the deadlift utilize pulling from racks (higher up) to deficit pulls (feet on blocks) to work on sticking points. If you aren't interested in deadlifts the same way a powerlifter is, I'd suggest sticking to a height where you can maintain an arch in your lower back at the lowest point in the movement (ie: on the ground).

Dec. 19, 2013, 10:04 p.m.
Posts: 0
Joined: Oct. 6, 2005

The closer the bar is to the top of your feet means the greater chance of you rounding your lower back. Rounded lower back when near your 1RM = greater chance of injury.

Powerlifters training the deadlift utilize pulling from racks (higher up) to deficit pulls (feet on blocks) to work on sticking points. If you aren't interested in deadlifts the same way a powerlifter is, I'd suggest sticking to a height where you can maintain an arch in your lower back at the lowest point in the movement (ie: on the ground).

I just started incorporating rack pulls into the training routine. A different move than I am used to and I can see it benefiting the overall lift. Definitely a way to move a lot of weight too.

Be careful with the deadlift and maintain form. It is too easy to hurt yourself!

Dec. 19, 2013, 11:03 p.m.
Posts: 100
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002

I've been doing heavier deadlifts lately and am wondering if the bar height off the ground can affect one's form. The bar at the gym has weights that are wider in diameter than what I have at home. I've been doing a weight that is a 3rep max for me. What do I need to be concerned about doing this same weight at home where I will be lifting from 2" lower?

make up a couple of wooden blocks out of 2x4's to go under the weights to raise the height of the bar up. your husband isn't very pretty but i'm sure he's smart enough to be able to figure something out.

context is everything

Dec. 20, 2013, 12:16 a.m.
Posts: 1584
Joined: June 20, 2003

Thanks for the input. I'll have to check my rom to see if I can keep my back in proper form. As for the blocks, my handy, handsome hubby is away making bucks or I'd have him busy welding me a chin up bar too!

Dec. 20, 2013, 12:31 a.m.
Posts: 100
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002

Thanks for the input. I'll have to check my rom to see if I can keep my back in proper form. As for the blocks, my handy, handsome hubby is away making bucks or I'd have him busy welding me a chin up bar too!

realistically you could use just about anything, even a couple of old phone books would work - anything to raise the bar a few inches off the floor.

context is everything

Dec. 20, 2013, 1:37 a.m.
Posts: 1584
Joined: June 20, 2003

Thanks! Now I have no excuses for tomorrow's work out.

Dec. 20, 2013, 10:23 a.m.
Posts: 11074
Joined: June 4, 2008

Thanks for the input. I'll have to check my rom to see if I can keep my back in proper form. As for the blocks, my handy, handsome hubby is away making bucks or I'd have him busy welding me a chin up bar too!

Just get a broomstick or similar pole. Put it along your spine and over your butt. If there is no gap between the pole and your back, you're rounding. Eventually, you'll know when you're rounding or not just by feel.

Another way to approach it is when at the bar, with a slight bend in your knees, try and stick your butt out. The only way to do that is to get some arch in your lower back. Keep that arch, and pull yourself down to the bar. Pull the slack out of the bar, then rip it off the ground. Hold it, look around at your cheering fans, then drop it and walk away screaming.

March 24, 2014, 2:01 p.m.
Posts: 1521
Joined: Nov. 21, 2002

Looking for some feedback: I'm in decent shape, 5'11, 160 lbs. My primary motivation for going to the gym is for general fitness and to build/maintain strength for cycling and skiing. My current routine is only 1-2 days a week at the gym, because frankly, when I'm not chained to my desk, I'd rather be outside. I wouldn't mind putting on 5-10 lbs of muscle, but I'm not going to spend sunny summer days in the gym when I could be on my bike instead.

Because I go to the gym relatively infrequently, my thoughts have been that focussing on squats, pull ups, and bench press will offer the most effective work out given my goals. I'll throw in a few other exercises for arms and core work, but I spend most of my time on the big movements for legs/chest/back. I'm also thinking of getting dead lifts back into my routine.

What does NSMB think? Am I wasting my time working out so infrequently? Should I be getting more variety? (I do squats/bench/pull ups every time I work out).

Way back from the old school days of NSMB…

March 24, 2014, 8:11 p.m.
Posts: 100
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002

Looking for some feedback: I'm in decent shape, 5'11, 160 lbs. My primary motivation for going to the gym is for general fitness and to build/maintain strength for cycling and skiing. My current routine is only 1-2 days a week at the gym, because frankly, when I'm not chained to my desk, I'd rather be outside. I wouldn't mind putting on 5-10 lbs of muscle, but I'm not going to spend sunny summer days in the gym when I could be on my bike instead.

Because I go to the gym relatively infrequently, my thoughts have been that focussing on squats, pull ups, and bench press will offer the most effective work out given my goals. I'll throw in a few other exercises for arms and core work, but I spend most of my time on the big movements for legs/chest/back. I'm also thinking of getting dead lifts back into my routine.

What does NSMB think? Am I wasting my time working out so infrequently? Should I be getting more variety? (I do squats/bench/pull ups every time I work out).

for how infrequently you work out those are good choices, but your lack of consistency is really what's hampering any progress. if you don't want to be in the gym i'd suggest doing bodyweight conditioning outside at a park/playground - but you need to commit to at least 2x/wk to get any measureable benefit. put together a circuit that lasts about 25min, do it 3x/wk and you'll get some decent results. you won't get strongman type strong but you will increase your stregnth, overall conditioning and improve your physique.

context is everything

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