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Picking up heavy things

Feb. 7, 2018, 11:57 a.m.
Posts: 1193
Joined: May 23, 2006

Posted by: ReductiMat

As you get older, you'd be wise to start lifting the major compound movements regularly for the rest of your life.

Preacher curls are all you need for optimum power and cardio.

If you want better shoulders, google Eric Cressey.

Get one 'o these! https://www.adrenalease.com/product/mens-performance-shirt/ I seen it on TV.............


 Last edited by: tungsten on Feb. 7, 2018, 12:02 p.m., edited 3 times in total.
Feb. 7, 2018, 12:07 p.m.
Posts: 10819
Joined: June 4, 2008

Posted by: tungsten

Posted by: ReductiMat

As you get older, you'd be wise to start lifting the major compound movements regularly for the rest of your life.

Preacher curls are all you need for optimum power and cardio.

Actually, it's 45 degree tricep kickback-pendulum swings.

All gyms should have a poster saying, "If you are doing triceps kickbacks and you aren't a juiced body-builder, don't fucking do this exercise.  Talk to one of us or someone else who looks like they know what they're doing".

Feb. 7, 2018, 4:22 p.m.
Posts: 1353
Joined: July 11, 2014

Posted by: ReductiMat

If you enjoyed it, I'd suggest learning the proper form and jumping back in.  I'm going to turn 45 this year and I just pulled my deadlift PR with ease today.  It's going to be nuked next time I get to test it out.

Can't wait.

For me it has been a mental barrier and trusting myself to maintain good form on true max efforts. I've done heavy singles but I'd say maybe to 95% only? I agitated my injury on a max effort front squat a couple years ago and that put me off going to the limit. I should probably do more heavy singles though, mostly doing 3's and 5's. Lifted for the first time in two months last night, my squats were 92% of where I was at in the fall but my press only 85%, shoulders have fallen off!

That is awesome hitting lifetime PR's into your 40's. I turn 37 in March and feel about the same I did at 25 and 30 which makes me happy.

Feb. 7, 2018, 4:32 p.m.
Posts: 1353
Joined: July 11, 2014

Posted by: Mic

Posted by: grambo

Sucks man. I did a L5/S1 partial herniation back in 2010 by deadlifting with garbage form, took about 11 months to heal without much physical activity and lots of sciatica pain. Haven't maxed out on anything since other than snatches and clean and jerk. These days it's just maintenance which is kinda boring but necessary as a desk sitter.

Yeah, I did something really, really stupid - was basically distracted by a beautiful woman while putting two 40kgs dumbbells away after a farmer's walk. I simply lost my form.

What I find interesting is that you do not dare maxing out except in the quick ones although these are way more challenging for the body/spine/muscles/coordination than an "ordinary" DL or squat. Have you ever tried a max DL since then at all?

Right now my PT tells me not to do any ballistic/quick stuff but focus on stability with ass little compression, shear and torque as possible... and I love high pulls with a clean grip and kettlebell swings. Guess, I do not try them until late summer. Really scared of surgery.

I honestly haven't done a max effort conventional DL since my injury. Can't seem to mulitquote on this forum so doing multiple replies here. I'm not currently doing the olympics lifts, but when I was I never got good enough technically to get my snatch/CJ over 55%/70% of my front squat so weights were never significant enough that I was worried... and I found I hit hit the lifts clean or failed smoothly. It was really fun training the lifts and if I had the equipment at home or easily accessible I think I would do it again.

I don't blame you for fear of surgery, I thought I might need it for my L5/S1, and I think that fear still plays into my mind a bit in the gym with heavy singles. I enjoy lifting but it's a means to an end (fitness for skiing/mtn biking) for me).

Feb. 7, 2018, 4:44 p.m.
Posts: 10819
Joined: June 4, 2008

Posted by: grambo

Posted by: ReductiMat

If you enjoyed it, I'd suggest learning the proper form and jumping back in. I'm going to turn 45 this year and I just pulled my deadlift PR with ease today. It's going to be nuked next time I get to test it out.

Can't wait.

For me it has been a mental barrier and trusting myself to maintain good form on true max efforts. I've done heavy singles but I'd say maybe to 95% only? I agitated my injury on a max effort front squat a couple years ago and that put me off going to the limit. I should probably do more heavy singles though, mostly doing 3's and 5's. Lifted for the first time in two months last night, my squats were 92% of where I was at in the fall but my press only 85%, shoulders have fallen off!

That is awesome hitting lifetime PR's into your 40's. I turn 37 in March and feel about the same I did at 25 and 30 which makes me happy.

The armchair psychologist in me is wondering if your fear of form is your downfall. I have never worried about form when stepping up to the bar for PR's. I worry a lot about form when I'm 50-85% and repping.

Have you ever tried a framework like 5/3/1? One where week one sees low weight, and a lot of reps, week two is medium weight and medium reps, with week three being high weight and low reps? I found getting in the practice of setting movement grooves allow me to forget about form when it comes to the time to test it all out.

On a separate note, I've never actually trained my front-squat for max, just for volume. There's always been a little part of me that said I should give that a go for a few months, but I really only train during the winter.


 Last edited by: ReductiMat on Feb. 7, 2018, 4:45 p.m., edited 1 time in total.
Feb. 8, 2018, 5:12 p.m.
Posts: 121
Joined: May 13, 2014

I have lifted weights routinely for over 10 years now, and only regret I didn't start it sooner.  Makes for a better ride/rider, too.  The upper body support on tech descents, I find, is easier with the upper body to help muscle and control the bike.  Squats, of course, but for me I cannot go heavy on squats due to a bad knee.  I just don't go heavy.

But I do like the shrugs, bent over rows, and I do dumbbell squats, and I love the feeling of the weight, knowing it is doing something (as if the next day doesn't tell me).  I can't stress enough proper form.  A lot of lower back issues come from bad form.  Another benefit is the added grip strength needed to keep the weight in your hand.  And we all know why we like better grip strength......

Feb. 8, 2018, 6:13 p.m.
Posts: 1353
Joined: July 11, 2014

Posted by: ReductiMat

Posted by: grambo

Posted by: ReductiMat

If you enjoyed it, I'd suggest learning the proper form and jumping back in. I'm going to turn 45 this year and I just pulled my deadlift PR with ease today. It's going to be nuked next time I get to test it out.

Can't wait.

For me it has been a mental barrier and trusting myself to maintain good form on true max efforts. I've done heavy singles but I'd say maybe to 95% only? I agitated my injury on a max effort front squat a couple years ago and that put me off going to the limit. I should probably do more heavy singles though, mostly doing 3's and 5's. Lifted for the first time in two months last night, my squats were 92% of where I was at in the fall but my press only 85%, shoulders have fallen off!

That is awesome hitting lifetime PR's into your 40's. I turn 37 in March and feel about the same I did at 25 and 30 which makes me happy.

The armchair psychologist in me is wondering if your fear of form is your downfall. I have never worried about form when stepping up to the bar for PR's. I worry a lot about form when I'm 50-85% and repping.

Have you ever tried a framework like 5/3/1? One where week one sees low weight, and a lot of reps, week two is medium weight and medium reps, with week three being high weight and low reps? I found getting in the practice of setting movement grooves allow me to forget about form when it comes to the time to test it all out.

On a separate note, I've never actually trained my front-squat for max, just for volume. There's always been a little part of me that said I should give that a go for a few months, but I really only train during the winter.

That's a fair point, and you know I should give 5/3/1 a try as I never ran that program... I've been guilty the last couple years of just doing the same thing (standard 3x5 linear progression but only lifting twice a week) and dropping the weight back 10% when not happy with form. Need to do a little research but a new program could get me more motivated than just phoning it in like I have been.

Feb. 10, 2018, 9:41 a.m.
Posts: 895
Joined: Nov. 8, 2003

Big kudos to the gym folks, wish I was as disciplined...or smart.

Swinging a heavy pick regularly and tossing boulders on the trail sounds like a cop out, but holy shit is that an all over body workout.

My mega fit XC buddy helped out the other day and about died. :lol:

Feb. 11, 2018, 11:49 a.m.
Posts: 370
Joined: Jan. 31, 2005

Posted by: ReductiMat

As you get older, you'd be wise to start lifting the major compound movements regularly for the rest of your life.

Yes. All the guys I used to ride with who used to laugh at my off-bike training, the same guys who used to say "I get all the training I need on the bike". Well they aren't riding much or well at this point because age caught up with that way of thinking.

Feb. 11, 2018, 2:53 p.m.
Posts: 12651
Joined: Nov. 24, 2002

Posted by: craw

Posted by: ReductiMat

As you get older, you'd be wise to start lifting the major compound movements regularly for the rest of your life.

Yes. All the guys I used to ride with who used to laugh at my off-bike training, the same guys who used to say "I get all the training I need on the bike". Well they aren't riding much or well at this point because age caught up with that way of thinking.

Never too late to get started?

Feb. 12, 2018, 2:04 p.m.
Posts: 2188
Joined: Sept. 5, 2012

no heavy lifting , I do multi muscle movement exercises now. I train at home so I am limited to 80lbs with a sand filled duffle bag I put together .

Feb. 12, 2018, 2:09 p.m.
Posts: 2188
Joined: Sept. 5, 2012

Posted by: Hepcat

Big kudos to the gym folks, wish I was as disciplined...or smart.

Swinging a heavy pick regularly and tossing boulders on the trail sounds like a cop out, but holy shit is that an all over body workout.

My mega fit XC buddy helped out the other day and about died. :lol:

one of the best work-outs , did 4 hrs of that on Friday. It,s not easy manhandling big rocks or hauling buckets of gold over awkward angle terrain. not to mention hiking in and out loaded up with gear.

Feb. 12, 2018, 6:30 p.m.
Posts: 10819
Joined: June 4, 2008

Given the discussion so far I feel the need to say I am in no way denigrating highish intensity work.

What I’m trying to get across that strengthing your ligaments and tendons are not visible in the mirror directly and that you need to train heavy to make those stronger.

From a cost/benefit perspective, I’d say everyone should be interested in that.

Feb. 12, 2018, 7:07 p.m.
Posts: 13
Joined: April 1, 2010

Posted by: DemonMike

one of the best work-outs , did 4 hrs of that on Friday. It,s not easy manhandling big rocks or hauling buckets of gold over awkward angle terrain. not to mention hiking in and out loaded up with gear.

When you lift in a gym, you make your body better.  When you lift in the woods, you make your world better.

Feb. 12, 2018, 7:13 p.m.
Posts: 10819
Joined: June 4, 2008

Posted by: WeTYC...

Posted by: DemonMike

one of the best work-outs , did 4 hrs of that on Friday. It,s not easy manhandling big rocks or hauling buckets of gold over awkward angle terrain. not to mention hiking in and out loaded up with gear.

When you lift in a gym, you make your body better.  When you lift in the woods, you make your world better.

Funny thing is the two aren’t mutually exclusive.

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