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Too many bike companies?

Jan. 6, 2020, 11:33 a.m.
Posts: 1392
Joined: Feb. 26, 2015

Thought I would throw this out there. Anyone have info on how the MTB industry is doing? There seems to be a crap load of bike companies to buy from. Also they are competing with the direct to consumer brands.

In my circle not many are replacing their bikes every couple years. The tech seems to have hit the wall with the new wheel sizes and there is a lot of great 2nd hand bikes for sale. So the replacing the old 26er for the bigger sizes has run its course.... I know many gearheads wouldn't be caught dead on last year's bike but that's not financially feasible for most. I for one bought a used demo, which was pretty much brand new with some scratches but have no plans to replace for a while.

Flame away

People always ask me what's the phenomenon
Yo what's up? Yo what's goin' on- Adam Yauch


 Last edited by: Brocklanders on Jan. 6, 2020, 11:35 a.m., edited 1 time in total.
Jan. 6, 2020, 12:17 p.m.
Posts: 28
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017

No idea how the industry is doing, sorry.

I do like to watch all the flailing to be second to market with the new trend (first being the one that gets pilloried), but I'm still happy on my 26" aluminium, coil sprung, too short to be rideable, no space for a bottle relic. 

Won't be buying a new bike this year.

Jan. 6, 2020, 12:52 p.m.
Posts: 950
Joined: Feb. 5, 2011

I'd also be curious to know how bike companies are doing these days. Funny how the price of a decent bike seemed to double in a relatively short period of time (5-10 years). Used to be able to get a mid-spec'd bike for $3,500 and now that has gone up to like $7k. Can't imagine many people buying a new bike every couple years at these price levels. Seems like a short term strategy that will have long run consequences.

Jan. 6, 2020, 1:18 p.m.
Posts: 11301
Joined: June 4, 2008

Joke all you want, but a 28.99mm spindle gave me the stiffness and suppleness to not give a fuck about anything anymore.

Jan. 6, 2020, 1:49 p.m.
Posts: 659
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017

seems insane to me. i know the market is huge and has grown massively in the last decade, but i wouldn't be surprised to see a lot of the cottage industry type guys fold in the next few years.  way too many companies to survive let alone make money.

Jan. 6, 2020, 2:14 p.m.
Posts: 889
Joined: June 26, 2012

Posted by: Bull_Dozer

Funny how the price of a decent bike seemed to double in a relatively short period of time (5-10 years). Used to be able to get a mid-spec'd bike for $3,500 and now that has gone up to like $7k. 

Part of that is definitely the exchange rate. No question prices have gone up, but the Canadian Dollar was also at par with USD for a while and now it isn't.

Jan. 6, 2020, 2:58 p.m.
Posts: 1181
Joined: Sept. 30, 2006

There are several companies I can think of that weren't able to keep up with the ridiculous marketing hype machine that the MTB industry has become in the last few years. As a company, you would have needed some pretty deep pockets and very loyal user base to stay viable over the past 5 or so years with all of the changes taking place.  I know that my wife and I would get a new bike or often just a new frame every 2-3 seasons, and the cost to do that wasn't even close to as prohibitive as it is now.  Now we are lucky to be able to experience something new every 5 years or so, and the cost has become unrealistic for most.


 Last edited by: shoreboy on Jan. 6, 2020, 3:02 p.m., edited 1 time in total.
Jan. 7, 2020, 7:37 a.m.
Posts: 2306
Joined: Sept. 5, 2012

IMO the cost is similar to the early 90,s. I paid $400 for a set of Cook Bros cranks in 94 I think. Typical bike , which was a steel hardtail was $2500/$5000 easily. The biggest issues I see today. There is no contentedness. Companies have followed the IT companies format. New products every 6 to 9 mths. I,m entering my 3rd season on my current bike. Hoping to upgrade the frame sometime this year. Just no idea to what 29er frame. More travel is my desire. There are still companies trickling out their latest .

Jan. 7, 2020, 8:03 a.m.
Posts: 7
Joined: Jan. 8, 2018

Posted by: Bull_Dozer

Funny how the price of a decent bike seemed to double in a relatively short period of time (5-10 years). Used to be able to get a mid-spec'd bike for $3,500 and now that has gone up to like $7k. Can't imagine many people buying a new bike every couple years at these price levels. Seems like a short term strategy that will have long run consequences.

One thing I've noticed on the Shore is the ageing bike rider demographic. Seems like half of the riders are now around the 40 to 50 year old mark with nice kit. So they're probably well into their careers and treating themselves to a new bike every year or so (instead of Harley's or boats). And treating yourself to a boutique bike brand is even more exciting than treating yourself to a mainstream brand. But I agree that bikes are way too expensive now. You can get a decent used car stuffed full of technology for the price of a bike.

Jan. 7, 2020, 9:16 a.m.
Posts: 1392
Joined: Feb. 26, 2015

Posted by: breakdance32

Posted by: Bull_Dozer

Funny how the price of a decent bike seemed to double in a relatively short period of time (5-10 years). Used to be able to get a mid-spec'd bike for $3,500 and now that has gone up to like $7k. Can't imagine many people buying a new bike every couple years at these price levels. Seems like a short term strategy that will have long run consequences.

One thing I've noticed on the Shore is the ageing bike rider demographic. Seems like half of the riders are now around the 40 to 50 year old mark with nice kit. So they're probably well into their careers and treating themselves to a new bike every year or so (instead of Harley's or boats). And treating yourself to a boutique bike brand is even more exciting than treating yourself to a mainstream brand. But I agree that bikes are way too expensive now. You can get a decent used car stuffed full of technology for the price of a bike.

I'm pretty sure my 29 enduro is worth more than my 08 outback.

Also sending my FS bike in for suspension service is more than servicing my car. MTB is an expensive habit.

Jan. 9, 2020, 6:56 p.m.
Posts: 92
Joined: March 1, 2017

Posted by: DemonMike

IMO the cost is similar to the early 90,s. I paid $400 for a set of Cook Bros cranks in 94 I think. Typical bike , which was a steel hardtail was $2500/$5000 easily. The biggest issues I see today. There is no contentedness. Companies have followed the IT companies format. New products every 6 to 9 mths. I,m entering my 3rd season on my current bike. Hoping to upgrade the frame sometime this year. Just no idea to what 29er frame. More travel is my desire. There are still companies trickling out their latest .

Yep, I paid around 350 UK pounds for a Bontrager rigid fork circa 1991!! I think my Merlin Ti bar was over 100 quid and I bent it with my bollocks on a BMX track after a few weeks ha ha.

Jan. 11, 2020, 9:23 a.m.
Posts: 14467
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

since the 90's some of you now have real lives with families/ jobs/ white piket fences, you are now looking at run bikes instead of DH bikes and yer putting them all in a mini van, so can you really afford to upgrade every year?

Also what has really changed enough that you really need to buy a new bike every year ?

so maybe you are growing up and have to choose  what is important ?


 Last edited by: XXX_er on Jan. 11, 2020, 9:25 a.m., edited 1 time in total.

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