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Tire pressure gauge

Dec. 4, 2013, 7:15 p.m.
Posts: 3874
Joined: Sept. 23, 2005

My tire slips on the small loose rocks and deflects on slightly larger rocks while climbing at high pressure. I dont like it.

I run 25psi in the front and 28psi in the rear on my 6"x6" all mountain trail bike thingy, and about the same on my XC 29'er hard tail. Almost always.

I might add a couple psi if the trail gets especially rough, but only to prevent rim damage.

Generally speaking, floor pumps arent very accurate for long. Floor pumps tend to be tossed around a bit and air pressure gauges are precision instruments. My floor pumps never last more than 2 or 3 years. Plenty to get your moneys worth in my opinion.

Its good to have a spare gauge that is tucked away in a safe place to refer to, but how do you know THAT is accurate? I have the luxury of working at a bike shop and having so many damn floor pumps around me that Ill know pretty quick if my personal floor pump is losing accuracy.

I suggest you just compare your pressure readings to any other pressure reading you can find. Go to a bike shop and ask to compare pressure readings to confirm that your pump is accurate. They should understand your concern.

As long as you are withing 2 psi of the average that you discover checking other pressure gauges, Id say youre floor pump is just fine.

thinkin bout bikes

Dec. 4, 2013, 7:22 p.m.
Posts: 3874
Joined: Sept. 23, 2005

My tire slips on the small loose rocks and deflects on slightly larger rocks while climbing at high pressure. I dont like it.

I run 25psi in the front and 28psi in the rear on my 6"x6" all mountain trail bike thingy, and about the same on my XC 29'er hard tail. Almost always.

I might add a couple psi if the trail gets especially rough, but only to prevent rim damage.

Generally speaking, floor pumps arent very accurate for long. Floor pumps tend to be tossed around a bit and air pressure gauges are precision instruments. My floor pumps never last more than 2 or 3 years. Plenty to get your moneys worth in my opinion.

Its good to have a spare gauge that is tucked away in a safe place to refer to, but how do you know THAT is accurate? I have the luxury of working at a bike shop and having so many damn floor pumps around me that Ill know pretty quick if my personal floor pump is losing accuracy.

I suggest you just compare your pressure readings to any other pressure reading you can find. Go to a bike shop and ask to compare pressure readings to confirm that your pump is accurate. They should understand your concern.

thinkin bout bikes

Dec. 4, 2013, 8:26 p.m.
Posts: 354
Joined: June 11, 2013

Not to be a nitpick, but even on road bikes you don't want to pump the tire up to the max. I run 90 front and 100 rear on my 23c Ultremos and it's like rolling on a speedy cloud. Even the smoothest road has little imperfections.

Agreed. There's a tendency to ride too high of pressure, especially on road. Try the Stans tubeless road wheels, ride them at a lower (for road) pressure, really nice smooth ride.

Dec. 5, 2013, 10:10 a.m.
Posts: 5635
Joined: Oct. 28, 2008

27/29 Front/Rear at all times. Front is tubeless, rear is tubed.

Wrong. Always.

Dec. 5, 2013, 11:18 a.m.
Posts: 33274
Joined: Nov. 19, 2002

The bike, tires, tube setup, rims, and rider weight are going to make a difference on what pressures you are running.

It is easy to dodge our responsibilities, but we cannot dodge the consequences of dodging our responsibilities.
- Josiah Stamp

Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race.
- H.G. Wells

Dec. 5, 2013, 11:31 a.m.
Posts: 8256
Joined: Nov. 21, 2002

. It is a myth that high psi on rough surfaces rolls faster. On a wooden track high psi is faster. On rough roads every little bump that your tire can't absorb changes forward motion into upward motion.

True but the fromme road is pretty smooth. 45 psi rolls noticeably easier than , say, 28 psi going up. Not as much as people might think though. I think over about 45 theres no gain.

WTB Frequency i23 rim, 650b NEW - $40

Dec. 5, 2013, 8:51 p.m.
Posts: 354
Joined: June 11, 2013

True but the fromme road is pretty smooth. 45 psi rolls noticeably easier than , say, 28 psi going up. Not as much as people might think though. I think over about 45 theres no gain.

You riding on the same Fromme road as the rest of us? ;-)

Yep, too firm of pressure slows you down. Compression of the tires is suspension while riding, firm tires eliminates the suspension, you bounce around as opposed to a smooth ride.

Dec. 5, 2013, 9:33 p.m.
Posts: 950
Joined: Feb. 5, 2011

True but the fromme road is pretty smooth. 45 psi rolls noticeably easier than , say, 28 psi going up. Not as much as people might think though. I think over about 45 theres no gain.

I think I agree with you on this one. For steep technical climbs I am willing to believe that a low tire pressure is better than a high tire pressure - but for the Fromme road I think a little extra tire pressure is beneficial.

Dec. 5, 2013, 10:23 p.m.
Posts: 33274
Joined: Nov. 19, 2002

Higher pressure is more air so rotational mass is greater and will slow you down on climbs, lol.

It is easy to dodge our responsibilities, but we cannot dodge the consequences of dodging our responsibilities.
- Josiah Stamp

Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race.
- H.G. Wells

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