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riding with glasses/goggles

May 24, 2020, 9:57 p.m.
Posts: 392
Joined: Nov. 25, 2013

I use Ryders (strider frame) with antifog coating - they are the best I've used. having said that, they fog on the climbs during warm/wet weather, but clear up quickly at the top before the down.

May 24, 2020, 9:58 p.m.
Posts: 658
Joined: May 11, 2018

Posted by: Vikb

Posted by: JBV

do any of you ride with glasses or goggles routinely?

I had two branches nearly take out my eyes last year and decided I had to get some glasses. Problem is we spend so much time in the forest on Southern Van Isle that I needed very light tint that still worked okay in the sun. Ended up with some Oakely Jawbreakers with photo chromatic lenses. $$$$ but amazing clarity and they get very light in the forest and dark enough out in the sun to be useful. Lost of coverage for dust and branch protection. The only time I don't wear them is night riding. I have two other pairs of Oakleys that are 15 years old so the cost/year is not bad as long as you are the type that frequently loses or damages sunglasses.

THIS

I have the exact same glasses. Always had troubles with fog/sweat, these are the best I've used. I wear a light headband under my helmet and it helps a lot with sweat management. Vikb is right on the money with the photochromic lens. It's almost always just right. The only time I don't use it is night riding.

They look better on vikb than me though :(

The durability is also true. Been using mine every ride for 4 years and both the lens and frame are in excellent shape.

If you  have any reservations about wearing glasses, I used to work with a very competent rider who took a casual spill on a moderate trail, landed the unfortunate way on a branch poking out of a rotten log - long story short, he has a glass eye now. When people used to ask if he recommended eye protection, he used to tap on his eyeball with a spoon while answering in the affirmative.


 Last edited by: RAHrider on May 24, 2020, 10:02 p.m., edited 1 time in total.
May 24, 2020, 10:45 p.m.
Posts: 807
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017

^^  that's intense.

May 25, 2020, 5:28 a.m.
Posts: 434
Joined: Sept. 10, 2012

Ya I didn't want to be the guy at the post-ride pub meet up doing tricks with his glass eye because I didn't wear glasses while riding! Ouch!

May 25, 2020, 8:55 a.m.
Posts: 1148
Joined: March 18, 2017

3M Virtua Sport Clear 

They come un different tints and are cheap AF

May 25, 2020, 11:18 a.m.
Posts: 14642
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

Could be they don't change fast enough in and out of different light situations or glare off the snow, not really sure exactly why but IME photo chromic lenses aren't real good in snow


 Last edited by: XXX_er on May 25, 2020, 11:20 a.m., edited 1 time in total.
May 25, 2020, 6 p.m.
Posts: 689
Joined: Nov. 23, 2002

Posted by: RAHrider

Posted by: Vikb

Ended up with some Oakely Jawbreakers with photo chromatic lenses. $$$$ but amazing clarity and they get very light in the forest and dark enough out in the sun to be useful. Lost of coverage for dust and branch protection.

THIS

I have the exact same glasses. Always had troubles with fog/sweat, these are the best I've used. I wear a light headband under my helmet and it helps a lot with sweat management.

The durability is also true. Been using mine every ride for 4 years and both the lens and frame are in excellent shape.

For anyone who has biologically deficient eyes and doesn’t like contact lenses you can get prescription lenses for the Jawbreakers 

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=GNOTQg6uKzQ

May 27, 2020, 12:52 p.m.
Posts: 599
Joined: Jan. 31, 2005

Posted by: XXX_er

Could be they don't change fast enough in and out of different light situations or glare off the snow, not really sure exactly why but IME photo chromic lenses aren't real good in snow

Mine are totally fine on the road where the transitions are from big sun to big shade and not that quick. On most shore trails It's a non issue.

May 27, 2020, 12:53 p.m.
Posts: 599
Joined: Jan. 31, 2005

Posted by: Vikb

Ya I didn't want to be the guy at the post-ride pub meet up doing tricks with his glass eye because I didn't wear glasses while riding! Ouch!

I am terrified of this outcome which is why I finally Invested in good eyewear which I now wear religiously. Think of all the rocks pinging against your down tube or fender. It's pretty amazing we don't suffer more eye injuries than we do.

May 28, 2020, 10:15 a.m.
Posts: 14642
Joined: Nov. 20, 2002

Posted by: craw

Posted by: XXX_er

Could be they don't change fast enough in and out of different light situations or glare off the snow, not really sure exactly why but IME photo chromic lenses aren't real good in snow

Mine are totally fine on the road where the transitions are from big sun to big shade and not that quick. On most shore trails It's a non issue.

So Notice I was specificaly talking about photo chromic lenses not working well skiing on snow

I have a pair I left in bright sun on a window sill behind a bug screen, when i picked them up they had the pattern of the bug screen on the lense which was freaky but that pattern disappperd in about 30sec

so they change pretty quick but if you got snow/ sun/ glare it's wierd, so lots of us ski and bike and its just another data point


 Last edited by: XXX_er on May 28, 2020, 10:20 a.m., edited 2 times in total.
May 28, 2020, 12:45 p.m.
Posts: 807
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017

Posted by: craw

Posted by: Vikb

Ya I didn't want to be the guy at the post-ride pub meet up doing tricks with his glass eye because I didn't wear glasses while riding! Ouch!

I am terrified of this outcome which is why I finally Invested in good eyewear which I now wear religiously. Think of all the rocks pinging against your down tube or fender. It's pretty amazing we don't suffer more eye injuries than we do.

exactly. i'm starting to think it's been shit luck that i haven't sustained a serious eye injury over the years. i'm starting to commit to glasses. i've had a pair of decent MEC riding shades with clear lenses that i figured out how to carry securely on my helmet for the climb. i rode our roughest trails down the other day and barely noticed them so that was a breakthrough for me. now to make it a habit, just like knee pads and gloves.

May 28, 2020, 1:38 p.m.
Posts: 1280
Joined: Sept. 30, 2006

Posted by: JBV

Posted by: craw

Posted by: Vikb

Ya I didn't want to be the guy at the post-ride pub meet up doing tricks with his glass eye because I didn't wear glasses while riding! Ouch!

I am terrified of this outcome which is why I finally Invested in good eyewear which I now wear religiously. Think of all the rocks pinging against your down tube or fender. It's pretty amazing we don't suffer more eye injuries than we do.

exactly. i'm starting to think it's been shit luck that i haven't sustained a serious eye injury over the years. i'm starting to commit to glasses. i've had a pair of decent MEC riding shades with clear lenses that i figured out how to carry securely on my helmet for the climb. i rode our roughest trails down the other day and barely noticed them so that was a breakthrough for me. now to make it a habit, just like knee pads and gloves.

Ryders has a 65% off sale on until the end of today.  They have a couple of models that are good for riding. Not necessarily photochromic for the ones on sale, but their anti-fog is some of the best I have encountered.

https://www.ryderseyewear.com/outlet

June 4, 2020, 10:50 a.m.
Posts: 2268
Joined: Nov. 22, 2002

I think I can add some useful info to this thread. 

First, I'm also a big fan of photochromic lenses. I've had great luck with Smith and Ryders and most recently, these shades from Julbo: https://www.julbo.com/en_ca/segment

For north shore/heavily forested conditions, particularly in winter, even the 'clearest' photochromic lenses usually have a small amount of tint that inhibits a bit of light, so when it's really dark/crappy and wet, I go with a full clear lens (I never find myself wishing I had a tinted lens - even on the ride home - btwn October and March anyway).

Lenses and their coatings can get saturated - even Ryders' vaunted antiFog has its limits, and you'll meet those limits while climbing through wet conditions on a colder day. So, if the ride involves a climb first (don't they always?) I'll begin with the glasses inside a lens bag, in a pocket that won't get wet or see pass-through condensation. In other words, NOT a jacket pocket, back jersey pocket, etc. Hip bag/pack all the way. Pull them out for the descent, and the antifog coating will be intact and you've given yourself a head start. Use that lens cloth to dry/clean them periodically, then stash it in a dry pocket.

Stashing on the helmet when climbing is convenient if you can pull it off, but works a lot better for roadies or fast rides, otherwise the heat coming off your head will outmatch the air flow and your glasses will be fogged up. Again, in warmer conditions you'll have better luck, but below about 15 degrees C, it's tough to manage. A roadie trip that does work, however, is clipping the glasses to the back of your jersey or jacket. They won't be subject to ventilation or condensation. They can still get wet back there but it's not too bad, they'll stay in place for mellow riding, and you won't likely forget them there. They're also easy to get at if you decide you want them on while climbing.

June 4, 2020, 12:44 p.m.
Posts: 1255
Joined: Nov. 8, 2003

Bought a pair of big ass fashionable Rudy Defenders recently, usually ride with smaller lens multi-sport Rudy Rydons.

Realized fogging/coverage is a trade off:

Smaller lens, less to no fog but occasional mud loogie sneaks under the lens into your eye. 

Big open lens better coverage, but more fog. 

Big lens with full frame underneath, lots of fog when stopped but zero mud loogies. A full frame will block your peripheral though, if you commute to the trail through traffic it's a problem.

Both of my glasses came with expensive photochromic lenses, as clear or amber seems to never be a stock option. I honestly can't imagine a use for photochromic lenses for mountain biking. The immediate obvious effect is that it makes forested trails darker and harder to see.

And in open bright trails fully tinted lenses would be a better option. 

Finally, photochromic lenses are especially useless for night riding use. 

I always switch the lenses out to clear asap and never wished for anything different.


 Last edited by: Hepcat on June 4, 2020, 5:18 p.m., edited 2 times in total.
June 5, 2020, 8:28 a.m.
Posts: 2345
Joined: Sept. 5, 2012

Posted by: pete@nsmb.com

I think I can add some useful info to this thread. 

First, I'm also a big fan of photochromic lenses. I've had great luck with Smith and Ryders and most recently, these shades from Julbo: https://www.julbo.com/en_ca/segment

For north shore/heavily forested conditions, particularly in winter, even the 'clearest' photochromic lenses usually have a small amount of tint that inhibits a bit of light, so when it's really dark/crappy and wet, I go with a full clear lens (I never find myself wishing I had a tinted lens - even on the ride home - btwn October and March anyway).

Lenses and their coatings can get saturated - even Ryders' vaunted antiFog has its limits, and you'll meet those limits while climbing through wet conditions on a colder day. So, if the ride involves a climb first (don't they always?) I'll begin with the glasses inside a lens bag, in a pocket that won't get wet or see pass-through condensation. In other words, NOT a jacket pocket, back jersey pocket, etc. Hip bag/pack all the way. Pull them out for the descent, and the antifog coating will be intact and you've given yourself a head start. Use that lens cloth to dry/clean them periodically, then stash it in a dry pocket.

Stashing on the helmet when climbing is convenient if you can pull it off, but works a lot better for roadies or fast rides, otherwise the heat coming off your head will outmatch the air flow and your glasses will be fogged up. Again, in warmer conditions you'll have better luck, but below about 15 degrees C, it's tough to manage. A roadie trip that does work, however, is clipping the glasses to the back of your jersey or jacket. They won't be subject to ventilation or condensation. They can still get wet back there but it's not too bad, they'll stay in place for mellow riding, and you won't likely forget them there. They're also easy to get at if you decide you want them on while climbing.

Is there a dealer locally ? And how are they price wise ? I hear you about climbing , anytime you look down at the BB. Water work all over the lens. That,s fine if it beads and rolls off when the position changes. But if it stays droplet form I can,t ride like that. As for Ryders I wear them daily. My daily use Rx glasses are their frames. Used their frames for Rx safety glasses for 7yrs or so.

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