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NSMB - 2020 - Hardtail Thread

Dec. 17, 2020, 9:37 a.m.
Posts: 12
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017

Posted by: AndrewMajor

Posted by: Vikb

Posted by: thaaad

We do have the space for it and I do really love it. 

I'd keep it for this winter. Re-evaluate in the Spring. As long as the above is true and you ride it then keeping it makes sense. If you find you are not riding it sell it come Spring when bike fever is peaking.

Strongly disagree. If you have a Chromag (or any hardtail) with fixed dropouts flip it ASAP! Pretty strong rumour going around that Chromag is finally adding sliders to some of their frames!!! 

Now all you slow-to-conform single speeders will have the ‘option’ to ride bikes a better way!

Covid wants you to single speed! Why else would there be no Eagle chains until July!?!?!?!??!?!?!???

OH that will be sweet! Any details on the grapevine? I love my konas with sliders (Honzo, Unit, Explosif). Always good to have an easy and reliable single speed option!

Dec. 17, 2020, 9:03 p.m.
Posts: 999
Joined: May 11, 2018

Isn't a Singulator a reliable single speed option? i like shorter chainstays to make the bike easier to get on the back wheel etc so the thing i never really liked about horizontal dropouts is that it makes perfectly short chainstays too long. Sometimes you get lucky with your gear and the chainstay length but I'm just as happy to run a singulator.

Dec. 18, 2020, 8:26 a.m.
Posts: 40
Joined: Feb. 9, 2019

Posted by: RAHrider

Isn't a Singulator a reliable single speed option? i like shorter chainstays to make the bike easier to get on the back wheel etc so the thing i never really liked about horizontal dropouts is that it makes perfectly short chainstays too long. Sometimes you get lucky with your gear and the chainstay length but I'm just as happy to run a singulator.

Sprung tensioners are noisy and sensitive to chainline, frame flex and contamination with thick mud in my experience and depending on the frame, longer chainstays might actually feel pretty nice/better than the short setting, but that's obviously personal preference. Also think of the clean lines!

I had a ~1992 GT Tequesta set up with a fixed tensioner at the BB, that worked pretty nicely, but even there noise and friction were more significant than on a nicely set up bike with an EBB, sliders or track ends.

Dec. 18, 2020, 8:54 a.m.
Posts: 603
Joined: Sept. 10, 2012

Yes you lose a lot of the benefits of going SS using a tensioner. With smart choice of chainring and cog I haven't found tensioning the chain to cause chainstay length issues.

Dec. 18, 2020, 9:03 a.m.
Posts: 1375
Joined: Sept. 30, 2006

Been running an ENO eccentric hub on my commuter for years. No need for a tensioner, or frame that has sliders or room for an EBB.

Dec. 18, 2020, 12:07 p.m.
Posts: 203
Joined: Feb. 24, 2017

Posted by: Vikb

Yes you lose a lot of the benefits of going SS using a tensioner. With smart choice of chainring and cog I haven't found tensioning the chain to cause chainstay length issues.

What exactly are the benefits of a single-speed mountain bike? Serious question. I sure don't see any down-side of having gears on my bike but I haven't tried going without them either.


 Last edited by: skooks on Dec. 18, 2020, 12:08 p.m., edited 1 time in total.
Dec. 18, 2020, 4:35 p.m.
Posts: 603
Joined: Sept. 10, 2012

Posted by: skooks

What exactly are the benefits of a single-speed mountain bike? Serious question. I sure don't see any down-side of having gears on my bike but I haven't tried going without them either.

1. lighter

2. simpler

3. more robust

4. weather proof

5. cheaper

I mostly ride geared bikes so I am not suggesting SS is better like it's the holy grail, but it's definitely different and some of the differences are benefits if you care about them. I have also done a bunch of touring on IGH bikes which is sort of the mash up of SS and gears. You get the simple chainline and it's harder to damage that drivetrain, but you lose the simpler/lighter/cheaper part of the equation in exchange for being able to change gears.

When I switched to SS on my Krampus I expected it to be a short-term thing for a laugh and then I'd put gears on that bike. Surprisingly it was a lot of fun and I have done some long 100K rides with a lot of climbing that I thought would be hard and they were enjoyable so I never did put gears on that bike and can't imagine doing so now. That's got me wanting to setup a trail bike SS and do some SS bike touring.

Dec. 18, 2020, 7:01 p.m.
Posts: 999
Joined: May 11, 2018

Posted by: Vikb

Posted by: skooks

What exactly are the benefits of a single-speed mountain bike? Serious question. I sure don't see any down-side of having gears on my bike but I haven't tried going without them either.

1. lighter

2. simpler

3. more robust

4. weather proof

5. cheaper

I mostly ride geared bikes so I am not suggesting SS is better like it's the holy grail, but it's definitely different and some of the differences are benefits if you care about them. I have also done a bunch of touring on IGH bikes which is sort of the mash up of SS and gears. You get the simple chainline and it's harder to damage that drivetrain, but you lose the simpler/lighter/cheaper part of the equation in exchange for being able to change gears.

When I switched to SS on my Krampus I expected it to be a short-term thing for a laugh and then I'd put gears on that bike. Surprisingly it was a lot of fun and I have done some long 100K rides with a lot of climbing that I thought would be hard and they were enjoyable so I never did put gears on that bike and can't imagine doing so now. That's got me wanting to setup a trail bike SS and do some SS bike touring.

Agree with above and would add that it forces you to ride differently. You have to be more engaged with the nuances of the trail. A hill is no longer a hill, it is a series of steeper sections with rest sections in between. Geared riders will think it is just one long hill all the same grade, but it's not. On ss, you power up the slightly steeper parts and recover when its less steep.  Same goes for flats and downhills. You pump everything you can as you don't have a gear hard enough to be able to pedal to keep speed. I am often amazed at how much people pedal. I can often keep up or even pass other riders just working the terrain. Definitely the best way to make you a better rider and make riding even more fun!

Dec. 19, 2020, 1:42 a.m.
Posts: 21
Joined: Aug. 15, 2010

for all you guys with single speed set ups. i have a transition trans am 29er i can change the drop outs to track ends how do i do the disc brake ie (set up ) since my brake is on the frame

Dec. 19, 2020, 2:29 a.m.
Posts: 999
Joined: May 11, 2018

Posted by: halfton

for all you guys with single speed set ups. i have a transition trans am 29er i can change the drop outs to track ends how do i do the disc brake ie (set up ) since my brake is on the frame

I don't know if there is a solution for that. On my honzo, the brake mount slid with the dropout. 

Like this

Dec. 19, 2020, 6:21 a.m.
Posts: 603
Joined: Sept. 10, 2012

Posted by: halfton

for all you guys with single speed set ups. i have a transition trans am 29er i can change the drop outs to track ends how do i do the disc brake ie (set up ) since my brake is on the frame

Photo from my Krampus. There is enough adjustment to get the brake in the right spot. I run my axle as far forward in the dropout as possible and I haven't bothered adjusting the brake mount when I make small adjustments to the chain tension. We'd have to see the frame/dropouts to give you really specific advice, but I'm sure Transition made sure it would all work. You could fire them an email.

BTW - I don't see any Transitional HTs for sale on their site. Can you still get the dropouts you are talking about or do you already have a set?


 Last edited by: Vikb on Dec. 19, 2020, 6:44 a.m., edited 1 time in total.
Dec. 19, 2020, 6:28 a.m.
Posts: 34
Joined: Dec. 6, 2008

@Vikb That sparkly green! Man, the old Krampus has some serious style.

Dec. 19, 2020, 7:07 a.m.
Posts: 603
Joined: Sept. 10, 2012

Posted by: gdharries

@Vikb That sparkly green! Man, the old Krampus has some serious style.

Thanks. It's probably the nicest finish on any MTB I've owned. Even after 8 years of regular use and abuse it's looking good...just with more character!

Dec. 19, 2020, 12:44 p.m.
Posts: 49
Joined: Aug. 13, 2017

Posted by: Vikb

Posted by: skooks

What exactly are the benefits of a single-speed mountain bike? Serious question. I sure don't see any down-side of having gears on my bike but I haven't tried going without them either.

1. lighter

2. simpler

3. more robust

4. weather proof

5. cheaper

I mostly ride geared bikes so I am not suggesting SS is better like it's the holy grail, but it's definitely different and some of the differences are benefits if you care about them. I have also done a bunch of touring on IGH bikes which is sort of the mash up of SS and gears. You get the simple chainline and it's harder to damage that drivetrain, but you lose the simpler/lighter/cheaper part of the equation in exchange for being able to change gears.

When I switched to SS on my Krampus I expected it to be a short-term thing for a laugh and then I'd put gears on that bike. Surprisingly it was a lot of fun and I have done some long 100K rides with a lot of climbing that I thought would be hard and they were enjoyable so I never did put gears on that bike and can't imagine doing so now. That's got me wanting to setup a trail bike SS and do some SS bike touring.

Also SS is way more efficient.  You notice it when you get back on a geared bike.

Dec. 19, 2020, 1:33 p.m.
Posts: 603
Joined: Sept. 10, 2012

Posted by: fartymarty

Also SS is way more efficient.  You notice it when you get back on a geared bike.

Good point. Being able to setup a perfect chainline is nice.

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