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New to the NS

Dec. 7, 2015, 1:23 p.m.
Posts: 105
Joined: Feb. 8, 2012

Probably a Giant Reign is the best bang for the buck to start on , proper geometry for riding the shore and even the low end one which is about $2800 comes with decent components like a PIKE fork etc . If you liked it lots and got more into you could replace some parts as needed but that frame should be great for several years to come . My 2 cents coming from a guy that rides a $8000 ish Santa Cruz Nomad .

Dec. 7, 2015, 2:55 p.m.
Posts: 6
Joined: Jan. 12, 2006

Definitely get an e-bike. They're super popular here.

Dec. 7, 2015, 5:36 p.m.
Posts: 1029
Joined: Feb. 12, 2009

Probably a Giant Reign is the best bang for the buck to start on , proper geometry for riding the shore and even the low end one which is about $2800 comes with decent components like a PIKE fork etc . If you liked it lots and got more into you could replace some parts as needed but that frame should be great for several years to come . My 2 cents coming from a guy that rides a $8000 ish Santa Cruz Nomad .

Not totally the same situation, but I bought a Reign last year. I was getting back into biking after a chunk of time off and basically needed to renew everything. It offered the best bang for my buck.

Dec. 7, 2015, 7:28 p.m.
Posts: 26384
Joined: Aug. 14, 2005

If you're dead set on getting a brand new bike I would wait less than 3 weeks and pick up either of the two bikes you listed for 20% or more off when the 2016's come out and those models go on sale. Buying a 2015 bike at the veeeerrrry end of the season is kinda crazy and the shop employees are likely rubbing their hands with glee because they'll be unloading a bike for full MSRP to someone who doesn't know anything about bikes (sorry) that they might not be able to sell in a month. Things change fast in the bike world.

I think, like everyone else said, you're best off buying a used bike - the learning curve is steep and you're going to wreck that brand new bike in no time. unless you're made of money you're probably going to get really tired of paying the shop to service your bike every week and be paying through the nose for top-end components every time you break something, which is going to nearly every ride.

^^This.

Also give yourself a bit of time to see if you can ride them and a bunch of others. Because sure you can have the expensive bike but if you don't feel comfortable on it you won't like riding it.

Another thing to consider is it is winter and if you plan to ride in winter. It wears gear out faster.

www.thisiswhy.co.uk

www.teamnfi.blogspot.com/

Dec. 8, 2015, 3:13 p.m.
Posts: 1511
Joined: July 11, 2014

Welcome. I started back into mountain biking just under 2 years ago after not riding rigid bikes as a kid in the mid 90's. I ended up getting a used bike for about $2k from a trusted friend with good components (Fox 36 fork, XT brakes, good wheelset with tubeless wheels and a dropper post). I think having a good full suspension bike lessens the learning curve a bit which is important as the north shore is somewhat unforgiving compared to riding areas. This is good in the long run because you will ramp up your skills quickly. People I've talked to with Enduros really like them, the Cane Creek shock is more adjustable than that RS although the 2016 has a dropper with more adjustment range, so it's a toss up.

As another poster said, join the NS Ride club, they have weeknight rides on the shore from April through September and then weekend rides to various locations around southwestern BC. Great group of people from all walks of life and a good way to meet riding buddies (plus trip the pub after).

Dec. 8, 2015, 5:17 p.m.
Posts: 1053
Joined: Nov. 8, 2003

Man, I just had a friend go through the newb new bike buying process. It didn't go well.

He had every detail of every component from each potential bike listed and later entered on spread sheets, suspension designs minutely examined.

Bike came, a Canyon, mail order. Top of the line model. A beautiful bike.

Top tube was too short.

I say go to the shop, ride em all around. Pay attention to fit and geometry. Keep your mind open. That right bike will speak to you. And utterly and completely ignore the spec sheet for now.

https://nsmba.ca/product-category/memberships/

Dec. 14, 2015, 11:28 a.m.
Posts: 0
Joined: Dec. 5, 2015

Just wanted to Thank every one for all the help and suggesting different options for me to go. Still working on trying out different bikes and seeing what works for me. I really appreciate all the help. Hope to see you all around the trails very soon.

Cheers [HTML_REMOVED] Happy Holidays!

Dec. 14, 2015, 4:25 p.m.
Posts: 468
Joined: Jan. 31, 2005

The enduro is an excellent bike and you will not out-grow it for a very long time. If I were choosing between the two model years I would go for the 2015, mostly due to the cane creek shock. I would never recommend starting off with a hard tail, even though that's what I learned on way back before Suspension was invented. The hard tail would be far less enjoyable to ride, and if you like the sport you would soon be buying a full-Suspension bike anyway. I always recommend buying the best bike you can afford and then learning how to ride it. If budget is a concern then buying used is a good option. You have come to the right place if you are seriously interested in mountain biking. Nsmb is a great resource. I would recommend spending some time getting to know the trails around squamish. They tend to be easier than the shore but no less fun. Good luck!

+1. As long as you can accept that you'll likely wreck a bunch of parts in your first few seasons then you should buy the best bike you can afford but consider that some of these repairs can get pricey so leave a cash buffer for that. You will have more fun on a better bike. Buying new has the bonus of establishing you with a particular shop whose help you will definitely need as you ride-break-repair-upgrade-repeat. Join NSRides or one of the other clubs on the Shore which are great for establishing your community.

There's nothing better than an Orangina after cheating death with Digger.

Dec. 25, 2015, 6:51 p.m.
Posts: 49
Joined: April 6, 2015

My first real bike was around $1000, second around $2000 and third around $3000… all at around 30% discount because they were last years models and people are idiots. Spent another $2000 upgrading the last one.

Personally I've really enjoyed every purchase and upgrade along the way from low end to where I am today. I think it has made me appreciate the sport more, and also given me a deeper understanding for the difference a new fork can make, for example… not to mention the enjoyment of having something new :)

It's been said, but my advice would also be to drive around visiting local stores in January. Go on a weekday when they're not too busy if possible. Buying locally means you will get help having the bike fitted to your body and riding style. You'll also get advice, warranty and tuneups (some shops even give you lifetime tuneups).

If money isn't an issue then go all in, but the most bang for your buck is in the mid-range… and possibly also the most enjoyment as you get to upgrade more often?

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