New posts

New Bike Day Coming Soon....

Oct. 18, 2019, 9:19 p.m.
Posts: 448
Joined: May 11, 2018

I have an opportunity to get into a Process frame. I have a bit of a bike problem - I'm the first to admit it. I live between two places so I often leave one or two in each location. I like to ride gnar but often get the chance to cruise some easy blues as well. One of my bikes broke and I jumped on the Knolly Warden sale so I now have three bikes. I don't really need another but again, I have a problem and a bin full of parts. My current rides include

150/150mm Mullet 29"front/27.5"rear

160/150mm 27.5"

Hardcore hardtail 150mm 27.5"

I have spare parts to mostly build the process

I'm thinking the 134 would fill a gap but in this day and age, why go short travel? The bikes all ride so well that I feel like you don't really gain much when you lose travel. I read a review of the 134 and they put it at 31+ lbs without pedals. How much more would the 153 weigh, especially given that the same parts would be going on either frame? I'm putting a DVO diamond on it so it can be any length between 140-160. Anyone ridden both of these? How different were they? Maybe I should just break down and get a long travel wagon wheeler?

Oct. 18, 2019, 9:44 p.m.
Posts: 1127
Joined: Nov. 8, 2003

So trying to decide between Process 134 and 153 frame? Sounds like you already have the equivalent of the 153 with your 150/160 bike eh? Go short travel try it out! 

I just ordered a 115mm bike (29 Trance) myself, I'm excited to see how the short travel rides.

Oct. 19, 2019, 1:43 a.m.
Posts: 768
Joined: June 29, 2006

Short travel is big fun, but only when your body has no weak points. For me personally, I tend to ride the same trails regardless if I am on my long travel or short travel bike. And afterwards, while being fun, my body is always really beat up from the short travel bike. Wrist pain and all that stuff. 

It might not be relevant, but if you think your biking career is going to continue for 20+ years, keep it in mind at least. 

If your trail network allows you to stick to easy trails for a full ride, then that’s fine. 

Maybe then you’d like a light bike though? And you’ve already got a hardtail. 

And to make the decision even harder:

My long travel 29er has made all my other bikes (except for commuting) obsolete. I haven’t touched another bike since I bought it in 2018. It’s incredibly versatile and fun AND easy on my body.

Oct. 19, 2019, 1:58 p.m.
Posts: 1127
Joined: Nov. 8, 2003

But, the climb.

Descent is a workout, but that hammer up is what I pay for the next day...and the 2 days after that. My body is one big weak point.

Depends on your riding pack I suppose? I feel like none of us here are going to get dropped outright on a descent, unless some local hero or something shows up.

But having regular Joe roadie/xc guys show up and go nuclear on the climb leaving us gasping in the dust seems likely.

Oct. 19, 2019, 3:11 p.m.
Posts: 768
Joined: June 29, 2006

That's a valid perspective, Hepcat! 

I personally do find that, apart from a race-light full blown carbon XC bike with skinny tires, my long travel bike with a very steep seat angle climbs barely worse or even better than most short travel sleds I've owned. 

Tires and seat angle make the biggest difference for me. With a fast and lightish rear tire, my main bike feels quick and fast. With a DHR II WT and thicker casing it rides much safer, but slower. 

As I don't get away riding light tires, especially not on a short travel bike, I've been let down slightly every time I built a "fast" bike, at least once I fitted tires which held up. 

I have to admit however that with the people I ride with I am usually one of the strongest climbers, which comes without much effort for me. On the other hand I have to really concentrate (and sometimes can't) really keep up with them on the descents. 

Maybe that's why I tend to favor bikes which help me feel more comfortable and secure and it might bias my perception regarding "fast" trail bikes. 

Also my wrists are weak sauce and need to be babied. A long travel bike with great and expensive suspension enables me to ride all year round. My short travel bikes were incredible fun, but my wrists started to hurt all the time and kept me from riding.

I have buddies who ride theirs hard all year, without any discomfort seemingly...

Whatever gives you the most fun is good!

Oct. 19, 2019, 5:11 p.m.
Posts: 1129
Joined: Nov. 21, 2002

I'm in a similar predicament. I've been a predominantly hardtail guy, saving the big bike just for the few days a year I'm in WBP. But I do want to move to a full suspension bike as my primary over the next year or two, and have the new SC Hightower or Tallboy in my sights. The 2 frames weigh basically the same, geo is basically the same, so it comes down to whether I need the extra 20mm the HT offers on the downs or whether the 20mm less travel of the TB will make it climb appreciably better.

But I think I'll still have a hardtail around ;)


 Last edited by: UFO on Oct. 19, 2019, 5:13 p.m., edited 1 time in total.
Oct. 19, 2019, 7:17 p.m.
Posts: 2311
Joined: Sept. 5, 2012

Posted by: Znarf

Short travel is big fun, but only when your body has no weak points. For me personally, I tend to ride the same trails regardless if I am on my long travel or short travel bike. And afterwards, while being fun, my body is always really beat up from the short travel bike. Wrist pain and all that stuff. 

It might not be relevant, but if you think your biking career is going to continue for 20+ years, keep it in mind at least. 

If your trail network allows you to stick to easy trails for a full ride, then that’s fine. 

Maybe then you’d like a light bike though? And you’ve already got a hardtail. 

And to make the decision even harder:

My long travel 29er has made all my other bikes (except for commuting) obsolete. I haven’t touched another bike since I bought it in 2018. It’s incredibly versatile and fun AND easy on my body.

What bike are you riding ??

Oct. 19, 2019, 8:06 p.m.
Posts: 448
Joined: May 11, 2018

Thanks for the advice. I think I have settled on the 134. I figure the higher progression of the suspension and shorter travel will give it a lively feel. I moved away from 29 as I had so much more fun riding 27.5. I hope the 134 can provide the fun ride I like in a 29er package.

My fork is set up at 150. I was thinking of leaving it. Thoughts?


 Last edited by: RAHrider on Oct. 19, 2019, 8:07 p.m., edited 1 time in total.
Oct. 19, 2019, 8:18 p.m.
Posts: 2311
Joined: Sept. 5, 2012

Posted by: RAHrider

Thanks for the advice. I think I have settled on the 134. I figure the higher progression of the suspension and shorter travel will give it a lively feel. I moved away from 29 as I had so much more fun riding 27.5. I hope the 134 can provide the fun ride I like in a 29er package.

My fork is set up at 150. I was thinking of leaving it. Thoughts?

They look like a lot of fun , Leave it at 150 IMO.

Oct. 20, 2019, 12:48 a.m.
Posts: 768
Joined: June 29, 2006

I am on a large Raaw Madonna with a 170mm fork. It’s a relatively heavy alloy frame built with the lightest parts that hold up to all the stuff a long travel 29er dishes out. Key is a light wheelset to keep it fun. 1850g DT Swiss 1501 with 30mm inner width has been fantastic!

The bike isn’t dramatically fast on flat trails, but it works. And depending on the shock it changes nature quite a bit. With a coil with platform lever it’s great for park riding and some climbing. With a Dpx2 or X2 with a firm climb lever it’s even playful. 

Because the geometry is so spot on for me (78deg seat angle), perfect reach, 210mm dropper etc, I really love it. It feels like a glove. 

And once I am in some proper terrain with really long climbs it just gets better. I noticed the weight on the first ten to fifteen rides, coming from a similar travel lighter carbon bike. But the Madonna is somehow just THE bike for me.

I’d add one more angle to the short travel angle:

IMHO if you build one, it only really shines with light/high end components and a light frame. Otherwise I’d take longer travel any day, as the travel doesn’t weigh anything and you can always add progression to your suspension and get a poppy feel... But with a light short travel bike is really fun. (I’d love to try a decked out new Tallboy)

I had a Specialized Stumpjumper Evo Carbon Expert 26“ for a couple of seasons. That thing was 150mm f and r and 11,8kg with proper tires and a dropper post. It was incredible fun and really quick and nimble. But I did break spokes, rims, tires, cranks and frame pivots all the time. Which I rarely managed on all my other bikes.

But still, you all are right in your opinions as bike choice nowadays is really a personal matter and very subjective as there are so many great bikes out there. Body proportions and size, fitness, preference...

And sometimes I feel I just need to try something different for a while to freshen things up and learn...

Oct. 20, 2019, 6:59 p.m.
Posts: 2311
Joined: Sept. 5, 2012

Posted by: Znarf

I am on a large Raaw Madonna with a 170mm fork. It’s a relatively heavy alloy frame built with the lightest parts that hold up to all the stuff a long travel 29er dishes out. Key is a light wheelset to keep it fun. 1850g DT Swiss 1501 with 30mm inner width has been fantastic!

The bike isn’t dramatically fast on flat trails, but it works. And depending on the shock it changes nature quite a bit. With a coil with platform lever it’s great for park riding and some climbing. With a Dpx2 or X2 with a firm climb lever it’s even playful. 

Because the geometry is so spot on for me (78deg seat angle), perfect reach, 210mm dropper etc, I really love it. It feels like a glove. 

And once I am in some proper terrain with really long climbs it just gets better. I noticed the weight on the first ten to fifteen rides, coming from a similar travel lighter carbon bike. But the Madonna is somehow just THE bike for me.

I’d add one more angle to the short travel angle:

IMHO if you build one, it only really shines with light/high end components and a light frame. Otherwise I’d take longer travel any day, as the travel doesn’t weigh anything and you can always add progression to your suspension and get a poppy feel... But with a light short travel bike is really fun. (I’d love to try a decked out new Tallboy)

I had a Specialized Stumpjumper Evo Carbon Expert 26“ for a couple of seasons. That thing was 150mm f and r and 11,8kg with proper tires and a dropper post. It was incredible fun and really quick and nimble. But I did break spokes, rims, tires, cranks and frame pivots all the time. Which I rarely managed on all my other bikes.

But still, you all are right in your opinions as bike choice nowadays is really a personal matter and very subjective as there are so many great bikes out there. Body proportions and size, fitness, preference...

And sometimes I feel I just need to try something different for a while to freshen things up and learn...

Oh nice bike, had my eye on those since they 1st debut. I,m considering the Privateer 161 , similar to the Raaw and  cheaper as well.

Oct. 20, 2019, 7:20 p.m.
Posts: 1127
Joined: Nov. 8, 2003

Posted by: Znarf

....(I’d love to try a decked out new Tallboy)

Dear god that is a beautiful bike. 🤤 Lust for that 2020 Tallboy is what led to me finally purchasing a 29er. 

First wanted that, then an Ibis Ripley.

$3100usd frame only Tallboy, $2833usd frame only Ripley.

Bought a carbon Trance. Complete build $3300usd, with a Marzocchi.

Oct. 20, 2019, 9:14 p.m.
Posts: 768
Joined: June 29, 2006

@hepcat: Giants are incredible value - or put the other way around, carbon boutique frames are not always! 3000$ + framesets are pretty much stretching beyond what I am ready to pay for a frame. It’ll be obsolete in three seasons ;-)

I’ve had great success with giant frames - they held up and the Maestro is one of the best rear suspension systems.

@demonmike: the Privateer looks great and pretty similar to the Madonna :) a no-nonsense bike. A refreshing experience after some years on a high-end carbon frame. Yes, it’s heavier, but don’t having to treat it like a raw egg (in the car, train, shuttling etc.) is so great.


 Last edited by: Znarf on Oct. 20, 2019, 9:16 p.m., edited 1 time in total.

Forum jump: